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LOVEMYRANGIE
18th February 2011, 12:44 AM
Have just started the process of trying to copy Matso's Mango Beer.
For those who dont know, Matso's is a specialty brewery in Broome with quite a good variety of essentially hand made beers.
24 exceptionally ripe mangos cut and blended into a purée and put in to freezer which will then be defrosted to increase the liquidity of the juice and reduce the slime like consistency.
Base for the brew will be a Belgian white much like a Hoegaarden but minus the orange and coriander.
Mango purée makes about 4litres and will use 2 litres per brew.
Really want to do this with a liquid wort but can't find anyone in WA who makes just wort and U-brew etc don't make it for sale unless your doing a full brew. At this stage will just go with the basics that Brewcraft supply for the Hoegaarden to start and progress from there.

Cheers

Andrew.


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Redback
18th February 2011, 08:10 AM
Try these guys in Perth, they have a range from Brewers Selection wort kits.
Home brew : Perth, Western Australia (http://www.malthouse.com.au/)

Baz.

LOVEMYRANGIE
18th February 2011, 10:53 AM
Mate!!
These guys are just down the road from my office!!
Will ring them today!!!




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LandyAndy
18th February 2011, 08:16 PM
Hey Andrew.
havent been too impressed with that mob,they are the original hombrew people in WA.
Brewcraft in Osborne Park are very helpful.
With the fruit its extremely important to blanch it in boiling water,it kills wild yeasts on the fruit that will ruin your brew.You can use the water you boil the mangoes in,only need to boil for a minute.
GOODLUCK
Let us know how it goes.
Andrew

LOVEMYRANGIE
19th February 2011, 02:00 AM
Hey Andrew.
havent been too impressed with that mob,they are the original hombrew people in WA.
Brewcraft in Osborne Park are very helpful.
With the fruit its extremely important to blanch it in boiling water,it kills wild yeasts on the fruit that will ruin your brew.You can use the water you boil the mangoes in,only need to boil for a minute.
GOODLUCK
Let us know how it goes.
Andrew

I rang this morning and he wasn't overly welcoming as I would have expected for a potential new customer, but it seems he is the only liquid wort supplier.
Brewcraft have unfortunately no liquid worts which I really want to try. Ossie Park is where I usually go and he did give me a $15 voucher for sprouting about how good the Fat Yak is resulting in 2 customers buying before they left.
He did say it all came from the east so it's travelability worries me slightly as does it's possible age, but yet to have a look and nothing ventured nothing gained.
With the mango, I'm freezing it now and then going to defrost it in a pot on the stove slowly, might even steam it but will get it just off the boil and then cool before adding.
I read somewhere else about over ripe fruit and yeasts etc affecting it so as I've already blended it, is the best way to heat treat it.

Will keep a running log of it.

Cheers

Andrew


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Redback
20th February 2011, 09:34 AM
Andrew I found this on the web;

Brew Your Own: The How-To Homebrew Beer Magazine - Techniques - Brewing with Fruit: Tips from the Pros (http://www.byo.com/stories/techniques/article/indices/19-brewing-tips/323-brewing-with-fruit-tips-from-the-pros)

Below is from a page of the site

Brewing beer with fruit
Tips

The Tips

• When making a fruit beer, use a neutral yeast.
• Try using a fruit puree.
• Add fruit to taste throughout the process.

With the success of the Razz Wheat, Belli has had a lot of practice making fruit beers.

“You don’t want to overpower the fruit flavor with something else, like hops or yeast,” Belli says. A Belgian or German yeast can add flavors you may not want. Instead he recommends using a neutral yeast.

So what’s the best form for your fruit? For homebrewers, using fresh or frozen fruit isn’t too much of a problem, according to Belli. “I suggest steeping the fruit in hot water, about 180° F, for 15 minutes to pasteurize it. Whole fruit with skin should be crushed before adding to your fermenter. I choose not to boil fruit to keep more of the fruit aroma intact. If you do boil the fruit you will set the pectin, which will result in a hazy finished beer. To break down the pectin try adding the enzyme pectinase at the end of fermentation.

For simplicity’s sake, Belli suggests using a puree instead of fresh fruit. “I have used fresh fruit, and it was a lot of work,” he says, recalling a time when he was colored red up to his elbows from crushing blueberries.

He warns that purees will vary from lot to lot, just as fresh fruit varies from crop to crop, and their flavors fade over time. A recent batch of Razz Wheat tasted quite different from the usual brew, because the puree wasn’t as fresh as it normally is.

That beer was made at the eastside brewery. “It seemed lighter; it didn’t seem as raspberry as we expected,” he says, but he attributed that to the new brewing system. “Then we made a batch at the pub and it went like wildfire.”

But the next batch was made at the pub with the same puree as the first one, and they discovered the puree was responsible for the difference.

“I didn’t realize it until it was out of the fermenter,” he says. “Then, you’re kind of stuck.”

Add fruit to taste as you go along. “I add it to the fermenter and let it ferment out, pull a sample, and taste it,” he says. “If you keep (the fruit) clean, and it’s pasteurized, you can just dump it in and the beer takes off again right away. As long as it’s still warm, the fruit sugar will allow fermentation to continue.

“If you do get a stuck fermentation, don’t be afraid to keep adding yeast after you’ve added the fruit,” he says.

Once you find a fruit that works, don’t stop there, Belli advises. “Don’t be afraid to experiment with different fruit beers. Based on the success of Razz Wheat, I tried a cherry beer. Customers who didn’t normally drink Razz Wheat like the cherry beer because the flavor was more subdued.” When the cherry was gone customers were clamoring for the next fruit beer.

“Over the past four years I have tried raspberry, peach, apple, blueberry, and even plums in beer,” he says. “Some brewers scoff at the fruit beer style, but when customers are making requests it’s hard to say no.”

That’s the joy of brewing at a brewpub and later going to a micro, Belli says. “You can experiment at the pub and get customer feedback. If a beer is well received it can be brewed on a larger scale at the micro.”

Stan Hieronymus and Daria Labinsky are authors of the Beer Travelers Guide, which lists more than 1,700 US brewpubs, bars, and restaurants that serve flavorful beer.

Hope this helps, Baz.

LOVEMYRANGIE
20th February 2011, 12:12 PM
The 180F steep is basically what I had in mind with putting it in the pot to just off the boil, however I didn't want to boil it in case it caramelizes the flavour of the mango.
I guess as it's already puree'd, maybe put it in a ziplock bag and stick in 180F water.....

That's quite a good site Baz! Feeds my dream of starting a micro! We have a couple of real good ones within 20 minutes of where I live near the Swan Valley. Good to see it's starting to balance out the wineries.
Same down around Margaret River area too, lots of little micros popping up.
Now, who's got a spare $700k I can borrow..... :angel:


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LOVEMYRANGIE
27th February 2011, 11:08 PM
Ok brew went down today.
Went to Malthouse in Welshpool yesterday, chose not to go with the liquid wort he had, 35c inside and it looked like it had been there for a little while along with most of the stock he had.... So, after ducking down to RichardK's place to pickup the two EAS units he was giving away, (big thanks mate. For me that's the score of the year!) dropped into Brewcraft Ossie Park and had a quick chat.
I ended up with a Brewcraft Hoegaarden (funny that, never seem to leave without one these days... ) and a 5g sachet of Lalvin FC1118 Saccharomyces Bayanus yeast.
This is a champagne yeast selected for it's vigorous fermenting capability of fruit. Used on it's own in beer wort has been guaranteed by Brewcraft without the need for any additional brew yeasts.
I was going to fore go the malt in the Hoe kit and get a single sprayed white wheat but a quite like the flavor and form of this one and a single might make it a little too wheaty, overpowering the mango.

As for the mango, 2lbs went into 23L total volume. Put 2L of water in a pot, got it to simmering then cut the frozen block from a 5L ice-cream container into 1/4's with each one weighing 1lb each (old time scales, no metric.... :( ) and added one to the pot. Slowly defrosted it, swirled and tasted. Not enough, add another block... disolve... taste.... perfect!

Cooled it down, mixed up wort and malt, cooled then mixed together.

The yeast was a dry yeast but requires hydrating in 50ml of Luke warm water for 15 minutes.
Added to the wort in the fermenter and was surprised as the slurry hopped back to the top!!

So now it's wait and see. Will check it in the morning for bubbling and decide if I want to add a fairly neutral type yeast or a pectin yeast if it starts looking cloudy. Wasn't boiled so thinking this won't be needed.

The Safbrew WB06 that normally comes with the Hoegaarden went into a spare Tooheys kit I had lying around with 200mls of Bickfords Lime cordial and 1 cup of castor sugar.

It's only been going for 3 hours and I'm already impatient!!

Cheers

Andrew


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LOVEMYRANGIE
1st March 2011, 12:00 PM
Well, the champagne yeast is rocking!!
May have to cut another hole for a second airlock it's gassing that much!! Has developed a 1inch thick head inside the fermenter and the smell is to die for! :) :)
Simones a bit miffed by the smell but then she doesn't appreciate art ;)


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Redback
1st March 2011, 01:16 PM
Don't worry about an airlock, just cover the lid with a tea towel until it settles then you can put an airlock back in.

Baz.

LOVEMYRANGIE
1st March 2011, 07:39 PM
I was going for the twin overhead airlocks in a vee formation.... :p


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LandyAndy
1st March 2011, 08:02 PM
Sounds good Andrew.
Young bloke at work has just started drinking his Mango Brew,he says its good.
If you are adding lime to make Fusion,Bickfords isnt the best.Ive found a 250ml bottle of Berri or Coles brand Lime concentrate is the best.250ml of Lemon concentrate makes a good Fusion Lemon,use a Canadian Blonde or Mexican Cerveza brew for best results.
Ive made GALLONS of the stuff in the past 18months.
Andrew

LOVEMYRANGIE
23rd March 2011, 10:18 PM
Guess I should update this!

Bottled it on the 15th and so far looks good.
Poured the first into a 1.25L sprite bottle as even with finings, mango and yeast was quite deep in the bottom of the fermenter and came thru the tap.

Pic below of first

http://184.72.239.143/mu/3aa0e987-d614-f22d.jpg

http://184.72.239.143/mu/3aa0e987-d65c-1e36.jpg

Curious to see how the taste is fermented, smelt pretty good but might try adding it screened with cheesecloth next time just before adding to brew or add a day or two prior to secondary ferment and bottling.

Might give it one more week then stick one in the fridge ;)


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LOVEMYRANGIE
5th April 2011, 10:58 PM
Have sampled the wares. Bottled for about 3 weeks, fermenting mango and wort together it's a wolf in sheeps clothing...

Tastewise, not too bad at all however fermenting together reduces the wheat and hides the mangoes fruitiness.
Also ends up quite cloudy and with two batches of finings, didn't clear it.
Champagne yeast worked well however being a top fermenter it floats and requires "mixing" before adding finings. This results in a cloudy messy sludge throughout the brew. :(

Plan for next brew:

Ferment Belgian white using normal
method and the right yeast to lift the flavour.

Still devising a cunning plan for the mango (meaning I don't have a clue yet...). Might try simmering it first and then slowly straining it into the wort and racking for a week before bottling. Should be enough yeast left to trigger a small amount of activity prior to bottling.

Mango is difficult to work with as it will always have solids in it that are hard to separate as I found out will all the fine fibrous material mixing with the yeast cake.

Pretty happy for a first go though!!

Andrew

I am not a moderator, I am a human being!!!

Distortion
5th April 2011, 11:12 PM
Dunno if it is relevant but I'm told a 50/50 mix of the matsos mango and chilli beers is amazing

LOVEMYRANGIE
6th April 2011, 12:14 AM
Dunno if it is relevant but I'm told a 50/50 mix of the matsos mango and chilli beers is amazing

Chili is on the cards for a late winter brew done in a full lager ;)


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Redback
6th April 2011, 07:49 AM
Your better off lagering your brew, once it's close to finished, transfer it into another clean fermenter, add 3 teaspoons of suger, give it a stir and leave it for a further 2 to 5 days, depending on how cloudy it is, this works much better than finnings.

I don't use finnings