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adonuff
7th August 2012, 06:04 PM
Hi All

Sitting here with a glass of beer in hand, it's one of the darker ales and one of the best I have ever made. When brewing it I used brown sugar, ran out of the brewing enhancer stuff half way through the mix so went looking for a replacement. Only thing was the brown sugar so in it went.

Wondering why not repeat the process??

I have read on many sites "DO NOT USE SUGAR"

Now I'm wondering why?

When I first started brewing I only used sugar and the results were great?

This brew is perfect, great malty taste good head and really drinkable.

Will be sad when the keg runs dry.

Any thoughts ???

isuzurover
7th August 2012, 08:49 PM
No problem with using sugar. As long as you are happy with the extra flavours sugar adds.

The other problem is that monosaccharides such as glucose/fructose/dextrose ferment more easily than sucrose.

You can turn the sugar into belgian candi-sugar if you want the best of both worlds...

Bigbjorn
8th August 2012, 05:13 AM
I almost always used 1.5 kg or 2.0 kgs raw sugar to one Coopers can, and sometimes when making a heavy ale or stout for winter used .5 kg of rich brown sugar in lieu or in addition. 2.0 kgs sugar makes a pretty strong drink, around 6.5%. I did a few batches of winter stout using a Coopers Stout can,2.0 kgs raw sugar and 1.0 kg rich brown sugar. Makes a brew at about 8.4%

Just about the best brews I made were a Coopers Real Ale can with 2.0 kg rich brown sugar. This is really good.

No longer allowed to drink much so I gave up brewing.

BreakingBad
8th August 2012, 08:55 AM
Here's a link to types of sugars. Note the third paragraph under sucrose.

Sugars (http://brewery.org/brewery/library/SugarSumm.html)

LandyAndy
8th August 2012, 07:18 PM
I have 1.5KG of brown sugar waiting to go into a 2can mix,stout and lager.
Did it once last year,great winter beer.Will be putting it down this weekend.
Andrew

Bigbjorn
8th August 2012, 08:29 PM
I have 1.5KG of brown sugar waiting to go into a 2can mix,stout and lager.
Did it once last year,great winter beer.Will be putting it down this weekend.
Andrew

How much are you making? Two cans, 1.5 kgs, and a 24 litre make will end up about 4.0-4.5%. I liked to make strong beer as a payback for all the work in making it. Usually up around the 6.0%.

simonmelb
9th August 2012, 12:07 PM
The only thing to watch out for is using too high a proportion of sucrose. Above around 40% of your fermentables by weight sucrose can inhibit yeast health resulting in an overly sweet tasting beer. So if you want to brew a stronger beer keep the sugar to around 30% by weight or less, airate your wort before pitching and ensure you're using a fresh sachet (or 2) of yeast.


Cheers
Simon
(working at the moment at Matilda Bay in Port Melb)

LandyAndy
9th August 2012, 05:47 PM
How much are you making? Two cans, 1.5 kgs, and a 24 litre make will end up about 4.0-4.5%. I liked to make strong beer as a payback for all the work in making it. Usually up around the 6.0%.

20 litres max of water Brian.The kegs are only 19lts;););)
Andrew

Bigbjorn
10th August 2012, 12:57 AM
The only thing to watch out for is using too high a proportion of sucrose. Above around 40% of your fermentables by weight sucrose can inhibit yeast health resulting in an overly sweet tasting beer. So if you want to brew a stronger beer keep the sugar to around 30% by weight or less, airate your wort before pitching and ensure you're using a fresh sachet (or 2) of yeast.


Cheers
Simon
(working at the moment at Matilda Bay in Port Melb)

I have fermented barley wine out at 18% using sugar and a yeast nutrient. The alcohol level kills the yeast and fermentation stops. You can control the sweetness by being careful with the amount of sugar. This is trial and error. Barley wine is supposed to be sweet and heavy.

Good stuff for serving to braggarts who reckon they can drink more than you. Don't tell them the % and stick a bottle or two into them and watch the fun.:D

LandyAndy
11th August 2012, 04:07 PM
I have fermented barley wine out at 18% using sugar and a yeast nutrient. The alcohol level kills the yeast and fermentation stops. You can control the sweetness by being careful with the amount of sugar. This is trial and error. Barley wine is supposed to be sweet and heavy.

Good stuff for serving to braggarts who reckon they can drink more than you. Don't tell them the % and stick a bottle or two into them and watch the fun.:D

Brian
There are unfermentable sugars that can be used for sweetness.I hate the nutra sweet taste some of the Apple Cider and Ginger Beer kits come with,I use Lactose,available from brew shops.
Andrew

Griffo
6th September 2012, 08:45 PM
Personally I never found Lactose (also called milk sugar) to do much sweetness wise, but then again I found out years ago I was lactose intollerant. No wonder all those Milk Stouts treated me so badly...

There's some tricks you can do to help the fermentation of a high % brew. Someone mentioned using two packs of yeast, but you can also try
a) hydrate the yeast first in clean distilled water first before adding. Sprinkle on the top, don't stir. The dried yeast wall is unable to filter the initial fluids when it's re-hydrating, leading to the yeast taking in all kinds of stuff that doesn't normally exisit inside the yeast cell. This can make it die prematurely

b) make a yeast starter - boil and cool 1lt of water with a couple of tablespoons of dried malt (get it at the bewshop). Aerate well, and add the yeast. Let it ferment for a day or two - you are in effect slowly introducing the yeast to a weak wort mix which lets them breed up lots more healthy yeast cells. Pour it into your high sugar content beer and they'll have a much better chance of fermenting it out before conking out. Don't worry, you won't be diluting your beer anything noticeable.