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S3ute
24th January 2013, 03:07 PM
Hello from Brisbane.

I have just come back from the USA and was wondering over a Christmas Bud or ten again why most of the US volume beer brands include rice as one of the ingredients? I believe most of our brewers stick to just water, hops and barley.

I recall reading years ago in an article on boutique American beers that it was just a sneaky cost cutter and a sign of lesser quality. However, like everyone else in the world making beer, the US brewers such as Budweiser claim to be producing "the finest and most flavoursome brew produced regardless of expense known anywhere in the world". Ridiculous claim, of course, and many Australians likely regard American beer as little better than dishwater, but the large brewers are surely not totally stupid and wouldn't shove something into their product that would limit its quality for no sensible reason other than shaving a few cents off the cost of materials.

Any thoughts?

Cheers,

simonmelb
1st February 2013, 07:13 AM
G'Day,

Just like the big 2 brewers here use cane sugar (and manufactured syrups derived from it) to mainly reduce costs, the US guys use rice and corn. Also, all 3 give the beer a light body, light colour and a dryer finish compared with using 100% malted barley as the main fermentable.

Cheers
Simon

Carnut1100
1st February 2013, 10:51 AM
Real beer vs cheap consumer product....
The big brewers also use super high alpha hops to give the bitterness level they are after with less hops, also means less aroma.

jazzaD1
1st February 2013, 11:05 AM
or they use hop extract

at a recent tour of the james boags brewery in launceston, the tour guide claimed they added white sugar as an ingredient because "it produces a product that australian beer drinkers want"

yet in homebrew circles it is pretty much frowned upon, especially if brewing from grain

S3ute
3rd February 2013, 12:16 AM
Hello again from Brisbane.

Thanks also for setting me straight on my original query on why the large US brewers would add nominally quality reducing ingredients into their recipes. It sits comfortably with what I now recall the boutique beer article was stating - in fact, it was the reason that I originally bothered to read a Budweiser label and noticed the "rice" component of the listed ingredients.

Well, the mainstream beers in the States may not be world beaters from everyone's perspective, but (IMHO) the places where you usually drink it can be a hell of lot of fun. I'm particularly thinking of the likes of Billy Bobs Honky Tonk in Fort Worth's Cowtown.........

Cheers,

Disco44
3rd February 2013, 08:22 AM
Hello again from Brisbane.

Thanks also for setting me straight on my original query on why the large US brewers would add nominally quality reducing ingredients into their recipes. It sits comfortably with what I now recall the boutique beer article was stating - in fact, it was the reason that I originally bothered to read a Budweiser label and noticed the "rice" component of the listed ingredients.

Well, the mainstream beers in the States may not be world beaters from everyone's perspective, but (IMHO) the places where you usually drink it can be a hell of lot of fun. I'm particularly thinking of the likes of Billy Bobs Honky Tonk in Fort Worth's Cowtown.........

Cheers,
I,ve always liked Millers,much better to me then Budwiser,it is dishwater.
John.

Carnut1100
3rd February 2013, 05:19 PM
The home brew kits tell you to add sugar but I never do when I use them.
They make a decent starting point but I use malt extract and extra hops and it comes out alright.

S3ute
4th February 2013, 09:27 PM
I,ve always liked Millers,much better to me then Budwiser,it is dishwater.
John.

John.

Hello again and I hear what you say.

Back when I was a student in North America in the late-70s I also thought that Bud was dishwater.

Probably still is, but I seem to have acquired a genuine taste for the stuff. During my last trip at Christmas it was selling in my corner deli for $8.99 a 12 pack and a schooner equivalent at Hooters on NFL nights is $2. So, a reasonably powerful incentive to drop the standards.....

Cheers,

d@rk51d3
4th February 2013, 10:24 PM
By drinking Bud, or going to Hooters?

:D

S3ute
4th February 2013, 11:25 PM
By drinking Bud, or going to Hooters?

:D

Hmmm.

A bit of both I guess.

The corporate slogan is "Tacky, yet unrefined"............

Cheers,

Redback
5th February 2013, 06:30 PM
The home brew kits tell you to add sugar but I never do when I use them.
They make a decent starting point but I use malt extract and extra hops and it comes out alright.

When they say sugar, they mean brewers sugar(ie) dextrose, Malt, Barley and so on, not caster or white sugar.

Caster sugar should only be used for carbonating bottled beers.

Baz

Carnut1100
14th February 2013, 06:04 PM
Pretty sure one of the kits had White Sugar listed to add...either way I use malt extract...

d@rk51d3
14th February 2013, 07:39 PM
Pretty sure one of the kits had White Sugar listed to add...

+1


Just getting into it myself. Used dark brown sugar in a Coopers stout, and held back on the water a bit to make a total of 20l.
Also tried light brown sugar in the Real ale kit, easy on the water.

Both came out quite nice.

Just bottled a Canadian blonde, and another Real ale, this time using the enhancer packs.

Never drunk so much beer in my life.......:o

Aussie
15th February 2013, 12:27 AM
I never use caster sugar was always told to use dextrose. I also use those malt enhancer packs and it makes a big difference, and buy proper yeast throw out the crap that comes with the extract tins.

Over time you will have a nice collection of different beers, well actually I thought I would have an ample supply of beer but I kept drinking them and never let them age properly, only when I got the keg system was I able to store beer away and let it age in the bottles. If you haven't got one get yourself a keg system they are fantastic.