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Captain_Rightfoot
16th August 2005, 07:13 PM
I just thought I'd see if there were any aeromodellers out there. I've been modelling pretty much continually since I was 14.

Mostly I've done competition aerobatics, but I've had a play at most things along the way. These days I mostly only do gliders just because of time constraints. I might actually do some power stuff this year as a friend wants to learn. style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif

DEFENDERZOOK
16th August 2005, 07:33 PM
i read the heading and just wanted to let you know about the warning
on the side of the glue....you know.......the one about adequate ventilation.....

Captain_Rightfoot
16th August 2005, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by DEFENDERZOOK
i read the heading and just wanted to let you know about the warning
on the side of the glue....you know.......the one about adequate ventilation.....
You can't beat working on a model and plying her with dope... :roll: style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif

I was actually at least half trying to be serious with this thread. 8O 8O

No more aeromodellers out there? style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif

p38arover
18th August 2005, 05:47 PM
I started flying models when I was about 10. I built my first flying (yes, it flew) helicopter at 12. Started flying control line in 1960 - I still have that Taipan 2.5 diesel engine.

My passion is RC helicopters. I have 4 or 5. I must rebuild the Hirobio Bell UH1 Huey (Iroquois) one day - I stripped it down for a repaint.

But I haven't flown anything for over 15 years even though I've still got all my stuff.

I used to fly RC aircraft and CL aircraft, race model cars, race model boats, etc. Not simultaneously but at the same time - if you get my drift.l I didn't stop one sport to pursue another.

I have an unused OS pulse jet at home. One day I'll get up the guts to start it.

Ron

Captain_Rightfoot
18th August 2005, 06:22 PM
Cool stuff Ron. style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif

I want to fly choppers too, but I've got a couple of friends to teach to fly before I can do that. At the moment they are a danger to shipping. 8O 8O

disconut
29th August 2005, 05:01 PM
Hey Captain,
Next time your coming over to Toowoomba drop a line, I have a P51 Mustang near finished. 65" wing span, retracts etc. Changed the original power plant to an OS 120 Supercharged unit. (never been run). 20" prop, 4" spinner etc.
A massive machine, should I actually finish it.
Could sell if the right person is interested. Engine was $1100, mount $200, kit was around $300. Custom spring loaded retracts with 4" scale wheels. $300 approx.
Sell it all for $750? 8O I have just run out of time. :cry:

Trev.

sclarke
29th August 2005, 05:18 PM
I've got a Remote control 90 series Fender..............

Captain_Rightfoot
19th November 2006, 02:19 PM
Well we're going night flying tonight at a nearby slope at Shorncliffe. Should be a barrel of laughs. :D :D

dobbo
19th November 2006, 02:27 PM
We used to build lemon guns, and model rockets (well home made potato motors) does this count?

Captain_Rightfoot
20th November 2006, 08:06 AM
Well we flew until 10pm last night ... lol. It was very dark!.

Highlight was the visit by the police who were very supportive :)

Apart from putting it in the very top of a tree first flight the rest of the time we were landing it at our feet. :)

weeds
20th November 2006, 09:15 AM
Well we're going night flying tonight at a nearby slope at Shorncliffe. Should be a barrel of laughs. :D :D

damnit, read the post to late, i was only two minutes away, keen to watch some plans fly, let us know when your next out

dobbo
20th November 2006, 09:17 AM
Has anyone built any of the jet powered models?

Peter_OZ
26th January 2007, 09:10 AM
I just thought I'd see if there were any aeromodellers out there. I've been modelling pretty much continually since I was 14.

Mostly I've done competition aerobatics, but I've had a play at most things along the way. These days I mostly only do gliders just because of time constraints. I might actually do some power stuff this year as a friend wants to learn. https://www.aulro.com/afvb/

yes been into model planes since about 16 when I flew control line. These days I'm into large scale R/C models, mainly WWII fighters.

A pic of my P51D Mustang to illustrate. 82" wingspan and 22lbs in weight.

cheers
Peter

p38arover
26th January 2007, 09:18 AM
A pic of my P51D Mustang to illustrate. 82" wingspan and 22lbs in weight.



Nice!

Ron

p38arover
26th January 2007, 09:20 AM
Has anyone built any of the jet powered models?


Can I sell you my never used OS PulseJet Type II (like this: http://www.bmfaclassifieds.co.uk/detail.php?id=12149 )?

Ron

Captain_Rightfoot
26th January 2007, 09:56 AM
yes been into model planes since about 16 when I flew control line. These days I'm into large scale R/C models, mainly WWII fighters.

A pic of my P51D Mustang to illustrate. 82" wingspan and 22lbs in weight.

cheers
Peter

Wow Peter... the mustang looks great!

1st post on the forum too :)

What landies do you have and where to you live? :)

Captain_Rightfoot
26th January 2007, 09:57 AM
Can I sell you my never used OS PulseJet Type II (like this: http://www.bmfaclassifieds.co.uk/detail.php?id=12149 )?

Ron
I used to love watching those things go at the nats each year. It was right up with night scramble as a highlight :)

Peter_OZ
26th January 2007, 10:47 PM
Can I sell you my never used OS PulseJet Type II (like this: http://www.bmfaclassifieds.co.uk/detail.php?id=12149 )?

Ron



sorry Ron, think those things are banned! I'll stick to the fighters

Peter_OZ
26th January 2007, 10:49 PM
Wow Peter... the mustang looks great!

1st post on the forum too :)

What landies do you have and where to you live? :)

thanks for that, I have several WWII fighters. 3 Spitfires of various marks and sizes, 65" span Mk IX, 90" span Mk XII, 96" Span MK VIII (to be built)

Finishing off a 86" span P47 ajnd have a 86" span F4U-1D Corsair to build.

I am just about to purchase a Disco 3 SE with TDV6. Completing negotiations at the moment and hope to place the actual order in the next week or 2. We are in Brisbane Northside area.

cheers
Peter

RobHay
26th January 2007, 11:37 PM
Great...another North Brissy member...of course you will have to get a Military Series.......so we can form a convoy and rule the Highway:o :D ;) :p :angel: :wasntme:

Captain_Rightfoot
27th January 2007, 07:25 AM
thanks for that, I have several WWII fighters. 3 Spitfires of various marks and sizes, 65" span Mk IX, 90" span Mk XII, 96" Span MK VIII (to be built)

Finishing off a 86" span P47 ajnd have a 86" span F4U-1D Corsair to build.

I am just about to purchase a Disco 3 SE with TDV6. Completing negotiations at the moment and hope to place the actual order in the next week or 2. We are in Brisbane Northside area.

cheers
Peter
So, do you fly at PRAMS? That's my club. :)

Peter_OZ
27th January 2007, 09:31 AM
So, do you fly at PRAMS? That's my club. :)



Nope, have flown there a few times. We live just up the road from there actually but are members at TMAC and also Coolum.

Too many trees at PRAMS for this black duck!

Captain_Rightfoot
27th January 2007, 10:35 AM
Nope, have flown there a few times. We live just up the road from there actually but are members at TMAC and also Coolum.

Too many trees at PRAMS for this black duck!
Fair enough! That field can understandably give that impression :) I have strained numerous models through trees over the years.

As my Dad and I were involved from the beginning with the field (I placed the strips) I'm quite used to it though and got better with it. Having said that landing a f3a model in there on a calm day was a bit of a challenge often requiring a bit of sideslipping to wash off speed. :eek:

Peter_OZ
27th January 2007, 05:07 PM
Great...another North Brissy member...of course you will have to get a Military Series.......so we can form a convoy and rule the Highway:o :D ;) :p :angel: :wasntme:


hmm maybe a WWII fighter will have to do! Had enough of driving military landies in my ronny raaf days!

Peter_OZ
27th January 2007, 05:10 PM
Fair enough! That field can understandably give that impression :) I have strained numerous models through trees over the years.

As my Dad and I were involved from the beginning with the field (I placed the strips) I'm quite used to it though and got better with it. Having said that landing a f3a model in there on a calm day was a bit of a challenge often requiring a bit of sideslipping to wash off speed. :eek:

yes the east / west runway is ok but the north south is nightmare, especially if on fianls from the north

put my astrohog into the top of a tree on south approach a few years back, had to shake the tree with the fourbie to get it out, fell out tail first and of course broke it off. All fixed and still flying it.

mmm 20 - 30 lbs of WWII fighter do not take too kindly to sideslipping!::eek:

Captain_Rightfoot
27th January 2007, 11:57 PM
mmm 20 - 30 lbs of WWII fighter do not take too kindly to sideslipping!::eek:
Yep... those type of aeroplanes can be a bit of a handfull. Once the rudder is on just a fraction too much elevator and by the time you could think "snap-roll" you'd have completed a 1.5 snap into the runway. Not a good look.

Even doing this manoeuvre with a patternship you really had to know when to get of the rudder and elevator. However it must be intrinsically safe as I learnt it in full size gliding (where it's part of the training program) and only adapted it to F3A models after that. :)

Anyway... I'm right there with you. If I had any big scale stuff I'd go to coolum too. :)

RR5L
28th January 2007, 08:12 AM
Could anyone suggest a good starting package for a learner, I use to fly control line planes as a kid, and raced RC boats for a while. I was thinking something like these electric park fliers might be a easy starting point. I know alot of the RTF packages have real cheap radio gear in them however.

Your thoughts?

Captain_Rightfoot
28th January 2007, 10:01 AM
Could anyone suggest a good starting package for a learner, I use to fly control line planes as a kid, and raced RC boats for a while. I was thinking something like these electric park fliers might be a easy starting point. I know alot of the RTF packages have real cheap radio gear in them however.

Your thoughts?
To be honest, I don't think they are good value. If you just want to go down to the park and do some crashing occasionally that's all good. However if you really want to learn to fly you should go to a proper club and buy a proper glow trainer.

I've seen a lot of people buy these park flyers. They are typically difficult to repair and rely on you buying parts. Each time they come with a complete setup so as they get beaten up you either spend lots on parts or buy more of them. My experience has shown that when everything is added up it's usually cheaper or at least no more expensive to go the conventional route.

An example is a mate of mine and his nephews. They would buy park flyers and bits... go down the park and keep working on it. Every month or two there would be a new one. $50 in parts... another $200 for a new plane. They ended up spending lots of money in little bits here and there and only sort of learned to fly.

So, I decided it was time to intervene! I helped them get slope soarers. They bought cheap radio, but at least good planes. With a bit of training they were away. All of a sudden they were getting 3 hours flying a week... and it wasn't costing them anything. This contrasted to 10 minutes at the controls and then a trip to the hobby shop. More importantly they were having way more fun.

Since then I've actually taught them to fly power and they are now onto their second planes and having fun. :) They are still flying gliders a lot and enjoying that too.

As to the park flyers themselves, some of them do fly ok, but if you want them to last they need a experienced pilot. Also, they need to fly in near calm conditions and most learners can't help themselves and go flying in too much wind.

Peter_OZ
28th January 2007, 07:00 PM
Could anyone suggest a good starting package for a learner, I use to fly control line planes as a kid, and raced RC boats for a while. I was thinking something like these electric park fliers might be a easy starting point. I know alot of the RTF packages have real cheap radio gear in them however.

Your thoughts?

it will depend on what you see yourself flying in say 5 years. Park flyers are ok for a lark but not for serious flying, you will not learn the intricies of flying, especially take off and landing with one of those. The wing loading is so low that virtually anyone can get them down in 1 piece.

Now is my opinion so bear with me.

Go for a 40 - 45 size high wing trainer, something like the Thunder tiger Pegasus ~$190 is agreat choice, they are durable, have landing gear that can be removed with snap locks for ease of putting in the car and the airfoil section while making a docile plane makes it also fully aerobatic, even inverted flight is possible.
My wife flies one and has been flying it for about 5 years now. Covering is a bit brittle but nothing clear packing tape can't fix.

Motor, Lots of cheap options there. Super Tigre GS-40 is agood choice, very reliable and cheap to purchase - about ~$110.

Servos. DO NOT SCRIMP ON SERVOS. IF you can afford say JR then pay the extra. Something like analog 591 or similar. ~$120 for four.

Battery pack, 6V, 1100mAh ~$40

Good quality heavy duty JR switch ~ $40

ok that is a start. Then you need your ground equipment. 12v battery, electric starter, fuel can, fuel pump, glow clip, spare glow plugs, rubber bands to hold wing on, tools etc etc.

JR radio set vary from the budget model at about $250 through to top of the range at about $2500. Buy what you can afford but remember if you stay in the hobby you will need an advanced radio down the track sooner then later. JR 9X VII is agreat radio, couple it with a JR R770 Synthesised PCM RX and you are in bsuiness. Or go up to a 10 channel RX such as the DS10.

Budget say $1500 which is plane, motor, radio and a modest assortment of ground equipment. Talk to guys in the clubs and get advice, join a club and be taught to minimun of Bronze wing standard.

all the best.

Cheers
Peter

ps PM me if you need further advice

Peter_OZ
28th January 2007, 07:10 PM
Yep... those type of aeroplanes can be a bit of a handfull. Once the rudder is on just a fraction too much elevator and by the time you could think "snap-roll" you'd have completed a 1.5 snap into the runway. Not a good look.

Even doing this manoeuvre with a patternship you really had to know when to get of the rudder and elevator. However it must be intrinsically safe as I learnt it in full size gliding (where it's part of the training program) and only adapted it to F3A models after that. :)

Anyway... I'm right there with you. If I had any big scale stuff I'd go to coolum too. :)


too true, they are quite prone to rudder stall on finals if not careful. I try and have it trimmed out so elevator movement is minumul. Usally just a bit of back pressure to check decent once it is in ground efffect. The P51 has huge flaps so that slows it quite nicely and makes it rock steady on the final approach.

Still having said that it is a very docile plane for a fighter, I had CG too far rearward at one stage by about 3". Was doing certification flights up at Coolum and was doing the loop phase. Damn thing snapped off the top of the loop and went into a spin. Each time I pulled it out it snapped again, recovered at about 20ft then very gingerly snuck around the cct and landed it quick smart.
Needless to say the batteries were moved right to the front. I found 3/4 lbs of lead in the tail of the thing, no wonder whe was squirrley:twisted:

cheers
PEter

RR5L
28th January 2007, 07:49 PM
Hey Captain and Peter,

Thanks for the replies, I figured your answers would of been as such and appreciate the advise. I want to see if this sets my world on fire before investing into all the good gear. Perhaps before I do anything I should go down to a locla club and just watch what goes on.

I remember as a kid looking at the old timers in the airborne magazines Id still love to build one.

Curious though with 10 channel system what can you do with so many channels? I can get a grip on perhaps 5 and 6...but 10?

Peter_OZ
29th January 2007, 08:20 AM
Hey Captain and Peter,

Thanks for the replies, I figured your answers would of been as such and appreciate the advise. I want to see if this sets my world on fire before investing into all the good gear. Perhaps before I do anything I should go down to a locla club and just watch what goes on.

I remember as a kid looking at the old timers in the airborne magazines Id still love to build one.

Curious though with 10 channel system what can you do with so many channels? I can get a grip on perhaps 5 and 6...but 10?

1. ailerons
2. elevators
3. rudder
4. throttle
5. retracts
6. flaps
7. dummy fuel tanks/bomb release (warbirds)
8. proportional brakes
9 & 10 used as mixes for such things as throttle curves. This is where one ch is mixed or slaved to another controlling ch. Could also be used as a remote control for engine kill, or used to control the gain of a gyro.

oh forgot spoilers - glider use though a lot of full size WWII aircraft use them as well.

trust me when you get right into it you will wish you had 20 channels to play with. :o

Send me a PM if you do decide to get into it, I can get you very good pricing on most stuff.

Apart from the fun of flying there is the building side. Most people overlook this side of the hobby these days with the advent of the ARF type of model, this is where the plane is 99% built, you simply glue on the major parts and you are flying the next day.

Building is very relaxing and enjoayable. Especially if you get into scale models.

anyway enough of my dribble.

cheers
Peter

Captain_Rightfoot
29th January 2007, 08:51 AM
Let's not forget as well that in many cases these days each elevator and aileron half are driven by their own servo. This means you've got 6 channels used with just the basic stuff.

I also think turbines also use a few channels.

It's a shame you're in MEL or I could introduce you to slope soaring... truly a great entry into the hobby.

weeds
29th January 2007, 09:06 AM
It's a shame you're in MEL or I could introduce you to slope soaring... truly a great entry into the hobby.


i'm back in brissy, give us a call next time your are on the slopes

Captain_Rightfoot
29th January 2007, 01:58 PM
i'm back in brissy, give us a call next time your are on the slopes
No worries.

Weather permitting we'll be out there one afternoon next weekend.

Peter_OZ
29th January 2007, 06:53 PM
i'm back in brissy, give us a call next time your are on the slopes

I'm brissy too

Captain_Rightfoot
29th January 2007, 07:47 PM
Maybe we should all go to the slope, and have a look at the action. I promise you won't be disappointed. There is usually one occasion each week when I am laughing so hard I can't fly. I nearly lost my plane last week because I was in convulsions after one of the guys managed to hit himself :D :D

Typically it's from 3 -4 until dark and often involves fish as chips at the local greasy who is quite good. :) It needs a wind direction between S and NE

Taz
29th January 2007, 09:08 PM
Captain_Rightfoot, just wondering what sort of slopers you fly? Foamies or the serious stuff? Dynamic soaring perhaps?
I'd like to get into slope soaring more but I'm limited by the lack of suitable sites near Perth. I enjoy flying EPP Erasers down at albany over xmas but thats the only chance I get, other than flying my HLG that I made at the local oval, but after a few years of repairs it now flys a little too heavy and fast for that confined space too.

HangOver
31st January 2007, 12:33 AM
when I was younger, (well, OK young) I had a model bi-plane from balsa wood and that tissue paper stuff that dries like a tough skin,(you know what I mean). Anyhow I was also halfway through building a B52 when I got out of bed and stepped on my bi-plane that I forgot I left next to my bed.
A lot of effort had gone to waste, it was toast :(

Never even tried again after that, the B52 would have been nice though it had a span of about 1500mm.

Peter_OZ
31st January 2007, 07:08 PM
when I was younger, (well, OK young) I had a model bi-plane from balsa wood and that tissue paper stuff that dries like a tough skin,(you know what I mean). Anyhow I was also halfway through building a B52 when I got out of bed and stepped on my bi-plane that I forgot I left next to my bed.
A lot of effort had gone to waste, it was toast :(

Never even tried again after that, the B52 would have been nice though it had a span of about 1500mm.

think most of us grew up making Gulliows balsa and tissue free flighters or rubber band powered models. Most kids these days never experience that.

Anyway go get back into it!