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weeds
15th April 2019, 06:00 AM
For us l, we carried 8 days of food on the OLT which I always thought would be about the max.

Hiked with a couple over the weekend and last year they did a 21 day hike across the Kimberley without food drops or re-supply. 21 days of food plus gear phew. Her pack was just on 20kg and I cannot remember what his was.

Homestar
15th April 2019, 06:52 AM
Wow! I used to hike a lot when I was younger and 8 days was my maximum too. Did that twice, but I couldnít hike 8 hours now, much less 8 days... 😞

numpty
15th April 2019, 07:27 AM
7 days max for me for Tassie Overland Track. Many times 4 or 5 days supplies.

I like to keep my pack to under 17kg's (should'nt be any more than 20% of your body weight). This includes my chair these days. We dehydrate and vac pack our own meals most of the time and supplement with Back Country meals or equivalent.

trout1105
15th April 2019, 07:36 AM
If you fish and or hunt you can supliment your supplies by a very large margin.
You can also eat the bush tucker available But in my own experiance even though you can survive on it bush tucker usually tastes like crap.

incisor
15th April 2019, 07:46 AM
But in my own experiance even though you can survive on it bush tucker usually tastes like crap.

amen!

weeds
15th April 2019, 09:29 AM
7 days max for me for Tassie Overland Track. Many times 4 or 5 days supplies.

I like to keep my pack to under 17kg's (should'nt be any more than 20% of your body weight). This includes my chair these days. We dehydrate and vac pack our own meals most of the time and supplement with Back Country meals or equivalent.

Good point on the percentage of body weight....

We need to work on base weight....

Oh and starting to research dehydrated.....and suggestions??

Homestar
15th April 2019, 09:54 AM
The dehydrated stuff back in the days I needed it was bloody aweful, but very limited selection so you put up with it. I'd like to hope things may have improved in this space in the last 25 to 30 years. And I'm starting to feel old as Dad only had a scale in pounds, so I kept my pack under 40Lb back then, although on short 1 or 2 night practice hikes I used to take friends on I would load up with all sorts of goodies... [biggrin]

austastar
15th April 2019, 10:12 AM
Hi,
I did 10 days through the Western Arthurs in 1980, that was a load I wasn't game to weigh.
We did cheat a bit by stashing some goodies and a raft at Craycroft Crossing, so did the last day out on the Huon River rather than the Yo Yo Track.
Cheers

DeanoH
15th April 2019, 11:54 AM
The dehydrated stuff back in the days I needed it was bloody aweful, but very limited selection so you put up with it. I'd like to hope things may have improved in this space in the last 25 to 30 years. And I'm starting to feel old as Dad only had a scale in pounds, so I kept my pack under 40Lb back then, although on short 1 or 2 night practice hikes I used to take friends on I would load up with all sorts of goodies... [biggrin]

Pretty much the same experience with me too.

"Back in the day", ........................ when I was a lot younger, fitter and invincible :) I hiked through Cradle Mountain Nat Park, Waldheim to Derwent Bridge carrying everything for a 9 day journey. H frame packs were 'newish' and only for the well heeled so the basic Flinders rangers A frame was common. No freeze dried tucker in 1969. I still have nightmares about Rosella Farmhouse Stew and Rice-a Riso. :) Primus Shellite stoves, ex army hexamite and the 'new' Meta solid fuel stoves were pretty common. I've no idea what my pack weighed but it was very heavy. For the last two days I carried a mates pack backwards across my chest as he'd injured himself and had enough trouble keeping up as it was.

Many years later my daughter was preparing for her Duke of Edinburgh award which entailed some serious bushwalking/hiking and I decided to get good gear instead of the old army surplus gear I started with so one Saturday morning made a trip into Melbourne to visit the 'hiking gear' shops in Little Bourke St. Well, I was like a kid in a lolly shop, I couldn't believe the huge range of freeze dried food and quality gear available and that was 25 years ago, so probably improved by a similar margin again. $1000 later with MacPac, boots, Trangia and other assorted goodies my daughter was on her way. This was a hell of a lot of money for us at the time but was well spent as it gave her the best opportunity to get a feel for bush walking without the negative experience of poor equipment.


IMO the real issue isn't how much food you can carry but the availability of potable water that determines how long you can last when 'living off your back'.


Deano :)

numpty
15th April 2019, 04:11 PM
Pretty much the same experience with me too.

"Back in the day", ........................ when I was a lot younger, fitter and invincible :) I hiked through Cradle Mountain Nat Park, Waldheim to Derwent Bridge carrying everything for a 9 day journey. H frame packs were 'newish' and only for the well heeled so the basic Flinders rangers A frame was common. No freeze dried tucker in 1969. I still have nightmares about Rosella Farmhouse Stew and Rice-a Riso. :) Primus Shellite stoves, ex army hexamite and the 'new' Meta solid fuel stoves were pretty common. I've no idea what my pack weighed but it was very heavy. For the last two days I carried a mates pack backwards across my chest as he'd injured himself and had enough trouble keeping up as it was.

Many years later my daughter was preparing for her Duke of Edinburgh award which entailed some serious bushwalking/hiking and I decided to get good gear instead of the old army surplus gear I started with so one Saturday morning made a trip into Melbourne to visit the 'hiking gear' shops in Little Bourke St. Well, I was like a kid in a lolly shop, I couldn't believe the huge range of freeze dried food and quality gear available and that was 25 years ago, so probably improved by a similar margin again. $1000 later with MacPac, boots, Trangia and other assorted goodies my daughter was on her way. This was a hell of a lot of money for us at the time but was well spent as it gave her the best opportunity to get a feel for bush walking without the negative experience of poor equipment.


IMO the real issue isn't how much food you can carry but the availability of potable water that determines how long you can last when 'living off your back'.


Deano :)

Exactly Deano and you're correct in your assumption that gear has improved again. We went through the business of sourcing new gear a couple of years ago in preparation for New Zealand walks. My new pack is 1.4 kg lighter than my old Macpac and sleeping bag about 800 grams lighter. Of course I've added 900 grams with the chair, but I couldn't do without that now.

numpty
15th April 2019, 04:20 PM
Good point on the percentage of body weight....

We need to work on base weight....

Oh and starting to research dehydrated.....and suggestions??

My decisions on food are based on the consideration that it's only for a few days, so you can put up with just about anything for a short time.

Breakfast we pre mix muesli, extra sultanas and chopped up dried apricots with powdered milk in a zip lock bag. Pour in bowl and add water.

Lunch (liquid is important) Cuppa soup and Sao's with vegemite or jam. Plus a cup of tea of course.

I make Spag bol, Chilli beef, savoury mince (lots of grated or finely chopped veg) and similar dishes. Dehydrate them and vac pac. We find 2 minute noodles a better accompaniment with this than rice and quicker to prepare. Supplement with a Back Coutry meal occasionally

Perry

weeds
15th April 2019, 04:54 PM
My decisions on food are based on the consideration that it's only for a few days, so you can put up with just about anything for a short time.

Breakfast we pre mix muesli, extra sultanas and chopped up dried apricots with powdered milk in a zip lock bag. Pour in bowl and add water.

Lunch (liquid is important) Cuppa soup and Sao's with vegemite or jam. Plus a cup of tea of course.

I make Spag bol, Chilli beef, savoury mince (lots of grated or finely chopped veg) and similar dishes. Dehydrate them and vac pac. We find 2 minute noodles a better accompaniment with this than rice and quicker to prepare. Supplement with a Back Coutry meal occasionally

Perry

Similar to what we pack.....we by Strive meals which we think are better the back country.

Just need to start preparing our own de-hydrated meals

We only purchased our gear two years ago, and were a little naive and wasnít cheap. Iíd now select differently but due to cost this gear will need some miles in it before I trade it in.

Markf
15th April 2019, 05:59 PM
I use an old Mountain Designs back pack which has served VERY well for walking trips and is still going strong. The most I've carried on a walking trip is two weeks of food. Didn't need to carry water on that trip - we were in Tassie where there was heaps of the stuff.
On the pushy I've carried as much as three weeks of food and a week of water. That was between Alice Springs and Giles where we had a depot which got us to Wiluna. That was an unsupported trip from Alice to Kal and was borne of too much Guinness.
Bike panniers are Bunyip for the rear and Macpak for the front all on Blackburn racks - tough as nails all of them.
All food was home dehydrated in a Harvest Maid dryer with 20 trays. I think they're called Ezidri now. We cooked the meals at home and then dried them before packing. Lots of dried fruit, pasta, rice and bol sauce.

Homestar
15th April 2019, 06:04 PM
My decisions on food are based on the consideration that it's only for a few days, so you can put up with just about anything for a short time.

Breakfast we pre mix muesli, extra sultanas and chopped up dried apricots with powdered milk in a zip lock bag. Pour in bowl and add water.

Lunch (liquid is important) Cuppa soup and Sao's with vegemite or jam. Plus a cup of tea of course.

I make Spag bol, Chilli beef, savoury mince (lots of grated or finely chopped veg) and similar dishes. Dehydrate them and vac pac. We find 2 minute noodles a better accompaniment with this than rice and quicker to prepare. Supplement with a Back Coutry meal occasionally

Perry

I know what your liquid lunches consist of. 😉

roverrescue
15th April 2019, 06:09 PM
The only hiking I do these days is remote exploring Barra trips
On the cape

Last trip we did was in November
Bloody hot
Thank God for lifestraw bottles and filters !!!

Despite lightweight hammock
Zero extra clothing
And just a few noodles (eat fish as it weighs nothing)

My pack was still 18kg for 5 days
Probably need to drop a bit of fishing gear off!!!

Day 1 I carried an extra 9kg from my old man and 6 beers
The beers was worth it !!!

My much much much better half walked 250km of the Camino in Spain a few years ago

With a day pack!!! of course lunch and dinner and board you made do in the villages!!!

Canít wait till our little ones have the legs to do something like the Overland or Patagonia or the Camino

S

Blknight.aus
15th April 2019, 06:45 PM
depends...

IF its long hard days... 6 days max... water becomes the main issue so I wont pack dehyds.

if its easy days out to 21 but its mostly dehyds.

numpty
15th April 2019, 08:29 PM
I know what your liquid lunches consist of. 😉

:clap2:Sometimes Gavin, but never when walking.

Don 130
15th April 2019, 09:12 PM
8 days for us on the OLT. And I think my heaviest pack(Macpack H frame)was just shy of 30 Kg backpacking in Peru, Equador, Bolivia and Galapagos 40 years ago. I was as fit as a buck rat then, and I'm definitely not now.
Don.

scottvdw
18th April 2019, 11:58 AM
We managed 14 days on The Port Davies Track followed by the South Coast Track in Tasmania in 2017 without resupply and carrying around 21kg each.
In winter 2018 we walked the Larapinta Trail west from Alice Springs over 16 Days (without food drops) carrying 20kg each - however I did buy an Ice cream at Ormiston Gorge on the way through.......

Scott.

DiscoMick
18th April 2019, 12:28 PM
What is this hiking thing of which you speak? Don't we buy Landys so we don't have to walk?
Now I'm a senior citizen, I only hike to the nearest dunny or coffee shop. [emoji16]

Ultraflex4x4
18th April 2019, 01:53 PM
You can easily carry 30 days food, it's the water that kills you.
Remember this one thing .
Filter THEN treat water.
Why ? Some algae are neurotoxins . If you heat the water Before you remove the Algae it releases the toxic chemical into the water.
You can use a "LIFE STRAW" and two containers, then simply boil the water or use iodine tincture or aquatabs .
If you are using iodine do not exceed 1 mg per day.
It's a process that takes a few hours so make ENOUGH WATER for the day or until your next water feature.
I use 4 L per day .. and electrolytes.
Remember just 5Kgs of beef jerky is PLENTY for 30 days.
about 3 Kg of Dried potato flakes and 1 Kg dried peas.
Throw in some Brown onion gravy powder .. yum.
You can take some milk powder and rice if that grabs you .
If you must take a "cooker" then use diesel / olive oil or a high density fuel like those Zip tablets.
at least olive oil you can use for many purposes and cross contamination won't kill you..
When I travelled around OZ
My emergency food was:
Beef jerky in 1 Kgs bags (10 off)
Dried peas about 1 Kgs
Milk powder 2 kgs
Rice about 5 kgs
Curry powder about 500g
Dried fish about 1 kgs
Dried onion about 1 Kgs.

We were flooded in for 32 days and I used this emergency food
was good to have it .
Water was filtered through a life straw and then treated with puritabs.
made 8 L per day

If you are in really cold conditions and having issues carrying enough carbohydrates then
you can cook up some onion bacon and suet fat season with some salt and some iodine.
It's something they use in arctic conditions. You will survive on it .. It does not taste too bad.
but in hot conditions everything melts.


Garret

austastar
18th April 2019, 02:00 PM
Hi,
The water just falls out of the sky on the west coast of Tas.
Cheers

Ultraflex4x4
18th April 2019, 02:16 PM
Hi,
The water just falls out of the sky on the west coast of Tas.
Cheers

Before after or during the bush fires ?

DiscoMick
18th April 2019, 05:05 PM
I know some former rebel soldiers from Burma. They carried a bag of rice and water with something to hear it in. They added whatever plant or animal they could find. They love beef jerky.
They're also skinny little buggers.I don't think I'm suitable to be a rebel soldier, but I admire their fortitude.

Tins
18th April 2019, 05:09 PM
In the Army you could carry the damned stuff for years and still avoid eating it....

donh54
19th April 2019, 08:34 AM
7 days rations, 250 rounds of link, and an M60. Then on day 5, my number 2 went down, so I also had the spare barrel, cleaning kit, plus another 500 rounds of link. Good thing I was a fit young bugger in them days!

TrakTorNator
29th May 2019, 09:30 PM
Yes, for about the same number of days as you. It's actually pretty difficult because rationing can't be planned as easily as other things. Also, everyone's bodies react differently when staying in nature, so it's especially difficult to foretell. In my youth, I found a couple of a go-to simple recipe dishes that can be cooked in field conditions, something like Five Great Food Ideas For Your Outdoor Adventure (http://under-the-open-sky.com/five-great-food-ideas-for-your-outdoor-adventure/) Of course, they work best for shorter trips and some contain freshly caught fish - unless you are a skilled fisherman who knows what he is doing, chances of having such a meal are low but others are quite easy to do because they involve leftovers.