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landyfromanuthaland
27th September 2007, 08:20 PM
Sometimes i hear the word CKD used when they talk of Landys being made, I assume they came here in knocked down form and were assembled by a local concern, obviously Landy never existed here as a dedicated assembler, Did Leyland here have anything to do with there construction or was Leyland Australia defunct by then, be intersting to know who made them and where:angel:

Defender=1st
27th September 2007, 08:25 PM
How Long ago you talking ??
My Series 3 i think is leyland built its got a lil Leyland badge on the door.

JDNSW
27th September 2007, 08:53 PM
Starting with the Series 1 from about 1950 they were assembled by the Pressed Metal Corporation, and later Rover Australia, which merged into Leyland Australia, then JRA. I don't believe any have been assembled locally since the late eighties. From the mid fifties at least there was significant local content, although it varied with the model - for example, most station wagons were fully imported. Substantial local design went into some models as well, particularly the military ones.

John

Lotz-A-Landies
27th September 2007, 09:39 PM
Starting with the Series 1 from about 1950 they were assembled by the Pressed Metal Corporation, and later Rover Australia, which merged into Leyland Australia, then JRA. ...
... John
Not completely correct. Rover Co Ltd contracted Pressed Metal Corporation who already assembled and built bodies for Leyland and AEC buses to assemble Land Rover vehicles but that only happened in about 1956. The factory was at Enfield in the mid western suburbs of Sydney. On Series 1 vehicles you should find a PMC built ID plate, just near the transfer box information plate vehicles, with an LRS or LRL serial number in addition to the chassis number. Land Rover and in fact Range Rover, production continued at Enfield, along with Pugeot until the mid 1980's. Australian Range Rover production ceased in about 1984 with the commissioning of the new Range Rover assembly plant in the UK. After the Enfield plant closed military Land Rovers, including the Parentie were built in the JRA plant at Moorebank.

Prior to PMC assembly, and in this case John's date of 1950 is correct, the Aussie CKD vehicles were assembled at a number of master distributors. Champion's Ltd in Adelaide, Regent Motors in Melbourne, Annand and Thompson in Brisbane and Grenville Motors in Sydney. (In fact the Grenville Motors assembly plant was in Australia Street Camperdown). Whether Faull's Motors in Perth actually assembled vehicles or only distributed them I am unaware.

There were quite some differences in build quality at the different assemblers and such was the quality control that Rover Co Ltd decided to have a single Australian assembly plant which was PMC as above.

Some interesting differences between the various assembly locations. In the 80" models the chassis number was supposed to be stamped on the LHS engine mount top, this was done at assembly and not at chassis manufacture (there is a chassis build number for that purpose). At Annand and Thompson by the 1953 models they had changed the location for the stamp to the top of the chassis rail and this location continue into the 1955 86" models which were supposed to be stamped on the spring hanger but A&T stamped the chassis rail top.

A&T also were the distributor responsible for the paint stenciled Land Rover on the front and rear of their vehicles.

Diana

HangOver
28th September 2007, 12:38 AM
"sort" of not a hi-jack

My RRC has CKD in white letters on the chasis I often wondered why, I guess now it's someones idea of a joke?
maybe?

JDNSW
28th September 2007, 06:09 AM
Not completely correct. ...... ......

Diana

I knew someone (probably you) would correct and amplify my information. My first hand knowledge only went back as far as the oldest Landrover I have owned ('56). Thanks for the information.

John

UncleHo
28th September 2007, 06:33 AM
G'day Lotz-A-Landies :)

G'morning Diana :) Thanks for that bit of info, that has filled in a little more of the Jigsaw:) I was not aware that Grenville Motors assy plant was in Australia St, that would be what became "Ausfields" Leyland Aust main distributors, I am aware that PMC is/was a wholly owned subsiduary of Leyland Aust, ad that there were differences in chassis No stampings on Series 1's but not where that originated from, they may have been assembled at A&T's building at Bulimba in Brisbane, which in the 60's was their detailing building.

cheers

4bee
28th September 2007, 07:31 AM
A&T also were the distributor responsible for the paint stenciled Land Rover on the front and rear of their vehicles.As per 253 27731 D 109" S2A PMC LRL 20219. Although this Rover didn't have it on the rear.

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2007/09/65.jpg

Lotz-A-Landies
28th September 2007, 08:35 AM
"sort" of not a hi-jack

My RRC has CKD in white letters on the chasis I often wondered why, I guess now it's someones idea of a joke?
maybe?
(Just being pedantic here, if it's officially a Classic then it's a 1994 build and can't be a CKD as all 1994's were assembled in the UK.)

When CKD vehicles were dispatched they were sent in batches usually multiples of 6. (6 chassis, 6 engines, etc etc.) It is highly likely that when a batch of chassis were produced in the chassis factory a stack of them that were destined for delivery to the CKD dispatch factory instead of the Lode Lane assembly line would have at least 1 chassis branded CKD to inform the drivers of the alternate delivery location.

This would explain your chassis, but only if your Rangie is pre-Phase 2 (1985 model).

Diana :):):):)

Lotz-A-Landies
28th September 2007, 09:15 AM
G'day Lotz-A-Landies :)

G'morning Diana :) Thanks for that bit of info, that has filled in a little more of the Jigsaw:) I was not aware that Grenville Motors assy plant was in Australia St, that would be what became "Ausfields" Leyland Aust main distributors, ...
I have seen some pics of the early assembly in the Grenville Motors Australia St Building. What I also know is that I purchased a new Subaru 4WD from Lannock Motors (also an LNC Industries name) from the same building in 1981.

My A & T assembled 1951 has a lubrication plate mentioning Newstead, would this be the same location I seem to remember was in Wickham Street accross from a park where they were running out the P76 in 1974? Haven't been to that part of BrisVegas in ages.

Diana

stusgonesailing
28th September 2007, 02:34 PM
the quick answer is.......l

My Grandfather. He worked at Granville motors for years before
starting up the Landy dealership in Coonamble NSW with

HangOver
28th September 2007, 02:37 PM
(Just being pedantic here, if it's officially a Classic then it's a 1994 build and can't be a CKD as all 1994's were assembled in the UK.)


I'm the same with the RRC phrase but I just use it to suggest the body type really rather than the year it's an 81'.
It's just too much work to explain that eveyone calls it a RRC, even me and there are some RRC's about but this isn't one of them although it looks the same as a RRC but the 'proper' classic was built between 94 and 96, (it was 96 wasn't it?)
See just tooooo long :D

landyfromanuthaland
28th September 2007, 02:50 PM
My series 3 is an 82 model and has a Leyland plate, not that its Oz made I have no idea where it came from could be South Africa or the UK, its very intersting the variations u see in all the Series Landys, there is a Landy up the road that has 3.9 badges on the doors, its a diesel and goes like a rocket, noisy thing and blows heaps of smoke, its about the same age as mine but the body differences between the two is intersting, Leyland I imagine no longer exists?

PhilipA
28th September 2007, 03:22 PM
Its easy to tell some of the RRC's that were built in OZ.
The yellow 80-81 s were painted with some Traffic Yellow they had left over from an RTA contract.
The pale green metallic 4 doors are a Holden Colour.
and the Red ones were also a Holden colour I think, or it may have been Ford Track Red.
Regards Philip A

Lotz-A-Landies
28th September 2007, 03:45 PM
I'm the same with the RRC phrase but I just use it to suggest the body type really rather than the year it's an 81'.
Will agree with that

... although it looks the same as a RRC but the 'proper' classic was built between 94 and 96, (it was 96 wasn't it?) See just tooooo long :D
My understanding was that the P38a was released at the end of the 1994 production year (August 1994) and that the original shape was continued in parallel for another 12 months, I guess that is the 1995 production year with the early vehicles being produced from August to December 1994 (1994 build, 1995 year model). So yes you would be correct about 1995 models, but I am unsure if the RRC continued into 1996 production, i.e. built after August 1995.

My series 3 is an 82 model and has a Leyland plate, not that its Oz made I have no idea where it came from could be South Africa or the UK, ... there is a Landy up the road that has 3.9 badges on the doors...
The Enfield NSW plant was still assembling Land Rovers in 1982, they were badged "Leyland" and the diesel "2.3 litre". The 3.9 you talk about was the Isuzu 4BDI engine and that was ONLY assembled in NSW. In fact a unique Australian specification.

... Leyland I imagine no longer exists? I believe that Leyland Trucks were absorbed into the IVECO conglomeration and were producing Leyland badged vehicles in the UK, just as IVECO produces Fiat badged trucks in Italy and Renault badged trucks in France or even International badged trucks in Australia.

Diana

numpty
28th September 2007, 04:49 PM
My series 3 is an 82 model and has a Leyland plate, not that its Oz made I have no idea where it came from could be South Africa or the UK, its very intersting the variations u see in all the Series Landys, there is a Landy up the road that has 3.9 badges on the doors, its a diesel and goes like a rocket, noisy thing and blows heaps of smoke, its about the same age as mine but the body differences between the two is intersting, Leyland I imagine no longer exists?

The 3.9 denotes an Isuzu diesel engined Series 3 Stage 1 of 3.9L capacity (4 cyl) This engine was only fitted to Australian Stage 1's and coil sprung 110's.

landyfromanuthaland
28th September 2007, 07:10 PM
What is a stage 1 Series3? , what spec were they?

numpty
28th September 2007, 07:29 PM
The Stage 1 was the first stage in model development from S3 to 110.
It consisted basically of a S3 body, with flush grille, mated to Range Rover running gear. ie V8, or later the 3.9 Isuzu, LT95 gearbox with associated RR transfer case. 3.54 diffs, being constant 4wd, like RR, but complete with drum brakes and leaf spring suspension.
They were available as 5 door SW, 3 door hardtop and 2 door tray back.

landyfromanuthaland
28th September 2007, 08:12 PM
Thanx Numpty thats been bugging me for a while the ol stage 1 biz

crazyausy
10th June 2015, 08:09 AM
stusgonesailing (http://www.aulro.com/afvb/members/stusgonesailing.html),your Grandfather's name wasn't Jeff Lang by chance? My Dad use to work for Grenville motors as well and was good mates with him.

landy
10th June 2015, 02:10 PM
I believe that Leyland Trucks were absorbed into the IVECO conglomeration and were producing Leyland badged vehicles in the UK, just as IVECO produces Fiat badged trucks in Italy and Renault badged trucks in France or even International badged trucks in Australia.

Diana

Leyland trucks was taken over by DAF (Paccar) who continued to produce Leyland trucks in the short term before producing rebadged DAF trucks for the UK market. Sherper vans (Freight Rover) were rebranded LDV (Leyland DAF vans). Rover as we all know was split and bought by British Aerospace who then split Land Rover and sold to Ford PAG.

Lotz-A-Landies
10th June 2015, 02:53 PM
Leyland trucks was taken over by DAF (Paccar) who continued to produce Leyland trucks in the short term before producing rebadged DAF trucks for the UK market. Sherper vans (Freight Rover) were rebranded LDV (Leyland DAF vans). Rover as we all know was split and bought by British Aerospace who then split Land Rover and sold to Ford PAG.Rover along with other marques under the British Leyland conglomerate were de-merged into Austin Rover and sold to BMW, who de-merged Land Rover, used the 4WD technology to develop the X series of SUV and onsold Land Rover to Ford PAG who also owned Aston Martin and Jaguar. Ford PAG couldn't make the British marques work, building a Jaguar on a Ford Lincoln platform, so they demerged and sold the Aston Martin name to joint venture capitalists and the remaining Jaguar Land Rover to Tata Industries of India. IMHO Tata is the best thing that happened to Land Rover since the Wilkes brothers.


BMW also asset stripped Austin Rover, kept the Mini Cooper tradename and renamed the remnants MG Rover, leaving a debt ridden wreck of a company with the traditional midlands factories and their unproductive workforce. MG Rover went into insolvency and the remainiing intellectual property sold to Chery in China. Land Rover however retained the Rover trademark and could, if they wished reintroduce the Rover name onto a range of cars.

landy
10th June 2015, 04:43 PM
Rover along with other marques under the British Leyland conglomerate were de-merged into Austin Rover and sold to BMW, who de-merged Land Rover, used the 4WD technology to develop the X series of SUV and onsold Land Rover to Ford PAG who also owned Aston Martin and Jaguar. Ford PAG couldn't make the British marques work, building a Jaguar on a Ford Lincoln platform, so they demerged and sold the Aston Martin name to joint venture capitalists and the remaining Jaguar Land Rover to Tata Industries of India. IMHO Tata is the best thing that happened to Land Rover since the Wilkes brothers.


BMW also asset stripped Austin Rover, kept the Mini Cooper tradename and renamed the remnants MG Rover, leaving a debt ridden wreck of a company with the traditional midlands factories and their unproductive workforce. MG Rover went into insolvency and the remainiing intellectual property sold to Chery in China. Land Rover however retained the Rover trademark and could, if they wished reintroduce the Rover name onto a range of cars.

From Wikipedia (so it must be true!):-

in the midst of BL's well-documented business troubles prompted the establishment of a separate Land Rover company but still under the BL umbrella, remaining part of the subsequent Rover Group in 1988, under the ownership of British Aerospace after the remains of British Leyland were broken up and privatised. In 1994 Rover Group plc was acquired by BMW. In 2000, Rover Group was broken up by BMW and Land Rover was sold to Ford Motor Company, becoming part of its Premier Automotive Group. In 2006 Ford purchased the Rover brand from BMW for around ?6 million. This reunited the Rover and Land Rover brands for the first time since 2000 when the Rover group was broken up by BMW.

But my mistake. First bought by British Aerospace then BMW then Ford PAG.

Tusker
10th June 2015, 05:19 PM
Not completely correct. Rover Co Ltd contracted Pressed Metal Corporation who already assembled and built bodies for Leyland and AEC buses to assemble Land Rover vehicles but that only happened in about 1956. The factory was at Enfield in the mid western suburbs of Sydney. On Series 1 vehicles you should find a PMC built ID plate, just near the transfer box information plate vehicles, with an LRS or LRL serial number in addition to the chassis number. Land Rover and in fact Range Rover, production continued at Enfield, along with Pugeot until the mid 1980's. Australian Range Rover production ceased in about 1984 with the commissioning of the new Range Rover assembly plant in the UK. After the Enfield plant closed military Land Rovers, including the Parentie were built in the JRA plant at Moorebank.

Prior to PMC assembly, and in this case John's date of 1950 is correct, the Aussie CKD vehicles were assembled at a number of master distributors. Champion's Ltd in Adelaide, Regent Motors in Melbourne, Annand and Thompson in Brisbane and Grenville Motors in Sydney. (In fact the Grenville Motors assembly plant was in Australia Street Camperdown). Whether Faull's Motors in Perth actually assembled vehicles or only distributed them I am unaware.

There were quite some differences in build quality at the different assemblers and such was the quality control that Rover Co Ltd decided to have a single Australian assembly plant which was PMC as above.

Some interesting differences between the various assembly locations. In the 80" models the chassis number was supposed to be stamped on the LHS engine mount top, this was done at assembly and not at chassis manufacture (there is a chassis build number for that purpose). At Annand and Thompson by the 1953 models they had changed the location for the stamp to the top of the chassis rail and this location continue into the 1955 86" models which were supposed to be stamped on the spring hanger but A&T stamped the chassis rail top.

A&T also were the distributor responsible for the paint stenciled Land Rover on the front and rear of their vehicles.

Diana

I've just been to see Graham Jones, as part of the LROC Sydney 50th next year. His recollection is consistent with the above.

It all started in Australia Street. The company concerned was assembling Chevs pre-war. Post war they lost that contract, & the only three franchises on offer were Rover, Mercedes Benz, & Citroen. Not a hard choice in the late 40s.

Initially it was just Rover cars, then Graham helped unpacked the first CKD Series 1. It seems they had no idea what had been sent to them. Land Rover quickly outsold Rover cars, and both streams had different clientele.

They had to move out of Australia St when that was turned over to VW assembly. The building is still there, currently being converted to apartments.

Graham was adamant that a decision was made to concentrate on Pressed Metal Corp, and all the satellite assembly plants interstate were closed. He;s a bit hazy on those details though.

He says that engines, gearboxes, and axles housings were the only components imported in the Pressed Metal era. Bodies, chassis etc were locally made. Gor him, things went downhill after the Leyland takeover and he left after the RR was introduced in 1970.

This thread is not Graham's story I know, and I've left out a hell of a lot. For LROCS members, he'll speak at the anniversary dinner next year and bring his photos of Australia Street. Something to look forward to.

Regards
Max P

Lotz-A-Landies
10th June 2015, 06:32 PM
G'day Lotz-A-Landies :)

G'morning Diana :) Thanks for that bit of info, that has filled in a little more of the Jigsaw:) I was not aware that Grenville Motors assy plant was in Australia St, that would be what became "Ausfields" Leyland Aust main distributors, I am aware that PMC is/was a wholly owned subsiduary of Leyland Aust, ad that there were differences in chassis No stampings on Series 1's but not where that originated from, they may have been assembled at A&T's building at Bulimba in Brisbane, which in the 60's was their detailing building.

cheersActually and I don't know why I missed this 8 years ago, PMC was a division of LNC (Lark, Neave & Carter) as were Grenville and Regent Motors in the 1950s so the transfer of Land Rover assembly from Grenville and Regents was economies of scale and increased profits for LNC. Rover Co. Ltd. maintained an engineering office initially in Melbourne and later in NSW (and Polo Flat during the early days of the Snowy Scheme) that supervised production and model changes, but the build was a contractual arrangement between the two corporations.

Whether PMC was purchased by Leyland later I am unaware, but PMC production moved from Sydney to Adelaide where they continued to build bus and coach bodies on various manufacturer chassis.

LNC Holdings also took over Annand and Thompson in the 1970s and were subsequently taken over by Permewan Wright. The irony to this is that Permewan Wright (who's principle business was stock and station agents/grocers) were local Land Rover dealers in Bombala, Coonamble and Coonabarabran in the 1950s.

JDNSW
12th June 2015, 05:41 AM
As Diana pointed out, Grenville motors and PMC are effectively the same entity, so it is hardly surprising that it was despatched to Grenville motors but placarded by PMC.

John

lewy
25th June 2015, 01:47 PM
I remember there being a paddock full of land rovers at heathcote road Morebank in the middle sixties i think at the leyland?factory as we called it.Also a paddock full of mini's.Dont know if they were assembled there though.I lived across the road.

Lotz-A-Landies
25th June 2015, 03:50 PM
I remember there being a paddock full of land rovers at heathcote road Morebank in the middle sixties i think at the leyland?factory as we called it.Also a paddock full of mini's.Dont know if they were assembled there though.I lived across the road.That was the Jaguar Rover Australia assembly plant. Where the Range Rover 2 door and Perentie 110 were assembled.

Baggy
17th July 2015, 12:35 AM
Hi All,

Thank you to everyone who's contibuted so far .....very interesting read.

Just a note I have a 81 RRC 2 door which was ordered through Winer Bottom Fauls in Perth with a 3 speed auto for the cockys who did'nt want to drive a manual.

Its a Borg Warner 35 3 speed and brochures at the time advertized the 3 speed auto was as quick as the manual.

Speaking with someone on this forum he was good mates with the guy who used to convert them in Eastern states for them.

Just a note .... I thought the term Classic was coined by Landrover to differentiate the shape at the release of the P38 due to Landrover offering both versions for sale and badging the earlier one for its classic shape.

As a 2 door owner one could argue that when Charles Spencer King designed the original RR it was as a 2 door

For that reason I?m comfortable to use the term RRC for my 2 door :)

Cheers

Baggy

Dobby
19th July 2015, 05:39 PM
I remember there being a paddock full of land rovers at heathcote road Morebank in the middle sixties i think at the leyland?factory as we called it.Also a paddock full of mini's.Dont know if they were assembled there though.I lived across the road.





I remember when I was living in Hammondville in the mid 70's driving past heaps of Land Rovers on Heathcote Road as well. I seem to recall J.R.A. were there at the time.

Lotz-A-Landies
20th July 2015, 02:26 PM
Hi All,

Thank you to everyone who's contibuted so far .....very interesting read.

Just a note I have a 81 RRC 2 door which was ordered through Winer Bottom Fauls in Perth with a 3 speed auto for the cockys who did'nt want to drive a manual.

Its a Borg Warner 35 3 speed and brochures at the time advertized the 3 speed auto was as quick as the manual.

Speaking with someone on this forum he was good mates with the guy who used to convert them in Eastern states for them.<Off Road Automatics Pty. Ltd. in Sydney. During the 1980's you could buy the complete LT95 gear set, primary pinion and layshaft (excluding transfer box gears and mainshaft) from a converted gearbox for a couple of hundred $, only had delivery miles on them. When the TF727/LT230 became a factory option demand for the BW35 conversion ceased.>

Just a note .... I thought the term Classic was coined by Landrover to differentiate the shape at the release of the P38 due to Landrover offering both versions for sale and badging the earlier one for its classic shape.

As a 2 door owner one could argue that when Charles Spencer King designed the original RR it was as a 2 door

For that reason I?m comfortable to use the term RRC for my 2 door :)

Cheers

BaggyYou are correct that for the first production year of the P38 there was parallel production of the original shape. These had a decal "Classic" on the tailgate. Therefore the official model title "Range Rover Classic" (RRC), however while the others had the "classic shape" they were not the RRC model and IMHO are "Range Rover classic" (RRc) an important distinction for a pedant like me.

My RRc is a Phase II Hi-Line called "Vague"! ;)

Baggy
1st August 2015, 10:34 PM
Thanks Lotz-A- Landies,

Appreciate the additional information and your insite.

Mines called "Mono" short for "Monolith" coined by my 5'2" wife who struggles to get in and out of her :D

Cheers

Baggy

CraigE
4th August 2015, 06:06 PM
Diana,
Only just reading this thread. I am pretty sure Faulls did not build, but did some minor assembly only. I have a copy of some ads somewhere. They only became the Land Rover Dealer in Perth in the early 70s from memory. Prior to that they were the Rover car dealer from the early 50s and actually badged the cars as Faulls on the firewall on some cars. We have 3 P4s a 56 badged as Faulls a 61 and 62 that came through Faulls but just had Rover badges. I also have a badge off a 57 that is Faulls. Martin Palmer formerly of Faulls lives nearby. He was with them for a long time from the 50s through to the end of their distributorship and delivered all 3 of the vehicles we have and was involved with LR sales I think too. Faulls started in Busseleton WA selling several brands and expanded from there. They became Winterbottom-Faulls in the mid 70s I think, then just Winterbottoms and eventually Barbagallos. If I catch up with Martin again I will ask him.
Cheers
CraigE



Not completely correct. Rover Co Ltd contracted Pressed Metal Corporation who already assembled and built bodies for Leyland and AEC buses to assemble Land Rover vehicles but that only happened in about 1956. The factory was at Enfield in the mid western suburbs of Sydney. On Series 1 vehicles you should find a PMC built ID plate, just near the transfer box information plate vehicles, with an LRS or LRL serial number in addition to the chassis number. Land Rover and in fact Range Rover, production continued at Enfield, along with Pugeot until the mid 1980's. Australian Range Rover production ceased in about 1984 with the commissioning of the new Range Rover assembly plant in the UK. After the Enfield plant closed military Land Rovers, including the Parentie were built in the JRA plant at Moorebank.

Prior to PMC assembly, and in this case John's date of 1950 is correct, the Aussie CKD vehicles were assembled at a number of master distributors. Champion's Ltd in Adelaide, Regent Motors in Melbourne, Annand and Thompson in Brisbane and Grenville Motors in Sydney. (In fact the Grenville Motors assembly plant was in Australia Street Camperdown). Whether Faull's Motors in Perth actually assembled vehicles or only distributed them I am unaware.

There were quite some differences in build quality at the different assemblers and such was the quality control that Rover Co Ltd decided to have a single Australian assembly plant which was PMC as above.

Some interesting differences between the various assembly locations. In the 80" models the chassis number was supposed to be stamped on the LHS engine mount top, this was done at assembly and not at chassis manufacture (there is a chassis build number for that purpose). At Annand and Thompson by the 1953 models they had changed the location for the stamp to the top of the chassis rail and this location continue into the 1955 86" models which were supposed to be stamped on the spring hanger but A&T stamped the chassis rail top.

A&T also were the distributor responsible for the paint stenciled Land Rover on the front and rear of their vehicles.

Diana

Lotz-A-Landies
4th August 2015, 08:25 PM
Faulls definitely distributed Land Rover from the beginning of production, in fact 1948 vehicle R860004 was distributed by Faulls to its original customer Great Boulder Mines where it remained never being registered until recovered and restored a few decades later.

However I am unaware if they assembled any. They are not listed in Mike Combridge's list of 1950 CKDs.

CraigE
5th August 2015, 09:43 AM
Faulls definitely distributed Land Rover from the beginning of production, in fact 1948 vehicle R860004 was distributed by Faulls to its original customer Great Boulder Mines where it remained never being registered until recovered and restored a few decades later.

However I am unaware if they assembled any. They are not listed in Mike Combridge's list of 1950 CKDs.
Checked some of my stuff last night. It appears in WA Winterbottoms became the LR dealer in 1970 odd. Taking over from Faulls (first Winterbottom-Faulls on the 60s and then just Winterbottoms. There are very scant details on the period of Faulls. Would be good if Martin Palmer and Thomas Tickel could put together some history as they both worked for them during this period. I know Faulls were the appointed Rover Car dealer, but also sold various other brands at some time and unsure if they were the appointed LR dealer or just sold them. Would be good to do some more research. As above I am sure Thomas would know.
I think I have a electronic copy of a Faulls ad from the 30s which I think was from Busselton and was promoting Chevrolet trucks? Will see what I can find. Talking to Martin some time ago I don't think they were a CKD as such, but pretty sure some of them did not come fully assembled and some was done. I was mainly focused on P series cars when talking to Martin. I know Martin either has or had some of the ledgers or may have given to the WA Rover club. Now that you have said it a friend of mine when we were in high school got a shorty Series 1 to rebuild and that had a Faulls plate on it, but that was over 30 years ago.

Old Farang
18th June 2016, 07:21 PM
Faulls definitely distributed Land Rover from the beginning of production, in fact 1948 vehicle R860004 was distributed by Faulls to its original customer Great Boulder Mines where it remained never being registered until recovered and restored a few decades later.

However I am unaware if they assembled any. They are not listed in Mike Combridge's list of 1950 CKDs.
Sorry, I have only just noticed this thread.
I bought my first Land Rover from Faulls in Perth in 1964. A series 2 diesel. Along with Martin Palmer and Thomas Tickel, Kevin Falconbridge of Rovertech fame, served his apprenticeship with Faulls.

DiscoMick
21st June 2016, 12:00 PM
Lots of fascinating historical information in this thread.
One question - were any of the LRs sent to the Snowy Mountains scheme built here or were they all imported? Just curious.

Old Farang
21st June 2016, 01:15 PM
The following shows the world wide distributors of Land Rovers in 1961.
Australia is at page 40 of 91.

http://www.lrfaq.org/Dealerships/Global_Distributors_Dealers_5th_Ed_1961_pt1.pdf

(sorry, I am not up with posting links, www.lrfaq.org/Dealerships/Global_Distributors_Dealers_5th_Ed_1961_pt1.pdf)

In Perth Faulls were known as just that, until Winterbottoms became involved in the 1970s, of which date I am not sure. They did not assemble Land Rovers to my knowledge, apart from changing cab types to customers requirements, and that only with used vehicles as far as I recall.

I was on the family farm at that time, and Faulls were one of the "old school" of dealers. One phone call and parts were dispatched the same day and charged to my account without question.

A couple of other old timers were Sam Small and Alex Brims.

Lotz-A-Landies
23rd June 2016, 06:55 PM
Lots of fascinating historical information in this thread.
One question - were any of the LRs sent to the Snowy Mountains scheme built here or were they all imported? Just curious.Yes. :D

Both imported built up and assembled here from CKD kits.

The built up vehicles were some of the early vehicles in each production year and the speciality variants like the 80 inch welders, Tickford station wagons, Rover factory and Firefly fire engines as well as several forward controls.

carlschmid2002
23rd June 2016, 09:10 PM
Whatever happened to JRA after the Perentie build/

Lotz-A-Landies
23rd June 2016, 11:48 PM
Whatever happened to JRA after the Perentie build/JRA as a manufacturing/assembly facility ceased to exist. With the de-merge of Land Rover from Rover Group to BMW and then the acquisition by Ford. The marketing arm was absorbed into Ford PAG Australia. Then when Tata purchased Jaguar and Land Rover off Ford, it was superseded by Jaguar Land Rover Limited. In Australia we have Land Rover Australia and Jaguar Australia (wholly owned divisions of JLR Ltd) for marketing and logistics of both marques in Australia, Oceania and SE Asia, but no assembly.