PDA

View Full Version : How careful do we really need to be??



Yorkshire_Jon
30th March 2008, 09:37 PM
Ive been reading up about all the potential killers in the outback and in the (Northern) waters over your side of the pond prior to my arrival...

The point is I think Ive read too much!!

The Box jellies dont really bother me, cos I dont intend becoming a fish!

The saltwater croc's seemingly can work their way a long way inland (think I read somewhere upto 100k's inland!?!?) and that we shouldnt use the same watering hole / route to it more than once or camp within 50m of water. Again this doesnt really bother me because I imagine we'll stop, camp and move on. Any if the Aussie midges are like the African ones, I would'nt want to camp within 50m of water anyway!!

Snakes - Seemingly they are as frightened of us as we are of them and so long as we respect them and be vigillant, we should be OK???

Spiders - I reckon these are our biggest threat - right??? Question though is how much of a problem are they (not just in the outback) and are there any do's and don'ts? When are they most prevelant?


We have snakes and stuff that could kill you in the UK, but in reality you'd be very unlikely to come to any grief camping anywhere. Clearly campsites need to be kept clean and dont leave litter etc etc.

I guess in short, how careful do we need to be?

Blknight.aus
30th March 2008, 09:45 PM
so long as you respect the wild life, stay away from the bins, the water holes at night and camp either up off of the ground or with the fly part of your swag/tent securely closed you'll be fine.

odds are even if you dont you'll still be fine with good repellants,

Ive no idea how many times I've slept on the hard rocky ground of australia with not much more than a set of DPCUs, a 6mm foam matt and a thin sheet of plastic between me, the planet and the sky.

abaddonxi
30th March 2008, 09:48 PM
Don't sleep naked when you're camping. If you do, don't leave your tent for a leak without getting pants on.

Snakes.

Cheers
Simon

29dinosaur
30th March 2008, 09:49 PM
How careful do we really need to be??

Very - especially of WASPS

Probably more Poms raped murdered and pillaged by them then any blackfellas or the local fauna.

Yorkshire_Jon
30th March 2008, 10:06 PM
...Ive no idea how many times I've slept on the hard rocky ground of australia with not much more than a set of DPCUs, a 6mm foam matt and a thin sheet of plastic between me, the planet and the sky.


Thanks everyone, thats more or less what I wanted to hear (with the exception of the wasps!!) The mrs is more relaxed about me going now!!

One thing though... Sleeping on a thin sheet of plastic... Is this to stop condensation wetting your swag / bag or to stop creepy crawlies or both??

As for the WASPS - Ive heard box jellies referred to as wasps and then of course there's flying wasp insects and is there any other kind of wasp that I may be missing or has been lost in translation!?!?

abaddonxi
30th March 2008, 10:41 PM
Seriously this time.;)

Shake your boots out in the morning in case any creepy crawlies get in at night.

Make sure all of your food is in sealed robust containers. Probably your biggest wildlife worries will be possums, etc. wanting the leftovers of last night's dinner.

I own a place out in the bush and one time I went there the ground was literally alive with spiders, it was like a scene from a movie. It wasn't just a small patch, either, we drove over a kilometre and every time we looked out if the Land Rover it was like that.

Weird, never seen anything like it before.

Cheers
Simon

dmdigital
30th March 2008, 10:42 PM
Jon,

Croc's can be a lot more than 100km inland try 300km and the same out to sea. Basic rule: if you can't see the bottom or all the banks then don't go in the water. Also if you are fishing, don't gut the fish on the bank, always stand back from the bank and keep one eye on the water nearby.

Box Jellies: really only October to April is the main season. Carry a 2L bottle of cheap vinegar if you're down the beach, this will aid in neutralising the sting.

Snakes: you've pretty much got it. Don't annoy them, they won't annoy you.

Spiders: (and snakes) always be careful picking up wood for fires etc. Doesn't hurt to use gloves for this activity anyway.

Now, have you heard about drop-bears, cause they are your biggest worry!

p38arover
30th March 2008, 10:54 PM
Now, have you heard about drop-bears, cause they are your biggest worry!

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/16.jpg

See also Dropbears (http://www.cfr.com.au/dropbears/index.html)

and DropBear Conspiracy Page (http://members.ozemail.com.au/~enigman/dropbear.html)

29dinosaur
31st March 2008, 09:35 AM
As for the WASPS - Ive heard box jellies referred to as wasps and then of course there's flying wasp insects and is there any other kind of wasp that I may be missing or has been lost in translation!?!?

White Anglosaxon ProtestantS .... seriously there's probably more o/s tourists killed by fellow humans (no they're not all wasps either...) than our nasty wildlife. (I live a few kms from the most notorious forest in Australia - the Belangalo forest where Ivan Milat left his grizzly footprints of murder).

The biggest dangers for o/s tourists are swimming in our seas - we seem to lose a few from drownings, probably followed losing a few in extreme wilderness areas where they have not been prepared for our hot isolated desert conditions and not realizing the huge distances that are needed to be covered to get from A to B.

p38arover
31st March 2008, 10:36 AM
White Anglosaxon ProtestantS ....

WAPS????

Try White AngloSaxon Protestants ....

They are more prevalent in the USA than here.

Pedro_The_Swift
31st March 2008, 10:41 AM
is now a good time to mention KILLER WASPS?
:eek:

dolphint
31st March 2008, 10:59 AM
is now a good time to mention KILLER WASPS?
:eek:

Yeah, there's 200 of 'em:o:wasntme::angel::p

JDNSW
31st March 2008, 11:12 AM
Pretty much covered by the above posts.

Australia has something like 9 out of 10 of the most dangerous snakes in the world, dangerous spiders, sea wasps, sharks, salties, wild buffalo, wild camels, drop bears, creeks that can flood for no apparent reason (rain a week ago miles upstream), bushfires, and probably others I haven't thought of ....

BUT!

In all my years working and living in rural Australia, including in the Gulf Country and two years in the Simpson Desert, the ONLY cause of death or serious injury I have had a direct connection with has been motor vehicle accidents. This puts the risks in perspective. Certainly, people have been killed by all of the above, but most of them can be almost totally avoided by the use of a little forethought and taking obvious precautions.

Never camp in a dry creek or close to water (if there is any possibility of dangerous animals, not only crocs - I remember one case where a group camped next to a waterhole, and one woke up in the middle of the night and spooked a mob of wild horses, that bolted through the camp, fortunately without treading on anyone).
Never put your hand under anything where you can't see - kick it over with your boot before picking it up, or wear gloves as suggested above.
Always carry enough water to keep you going until found, depending on whether you have communications or a strict travel plan and where you are, this will vary. In some parts of the country, survival time without water can be under twelve hours in summer.
Always stay with the car - a lot easier to spot than a person on foot.
Always think out the possible risks of anything you plan on doing before doing it! (e.g. Going for a walk out of sight of the camp, for example)

John

Blknight.aus
31st March 2008, 12:21 PM
One thing though... Sleeping on a thin sheet of plastic... Is this to stop condensation wetting your swag / bag or to stop creepy crawlies or both??


on? try under and thats all there is, what your wearing the 1/2 body length sheet of 6mm foam rubber and the hootchie (thin sheet of plastic). When you get given a radio and orders to get to top of yon hill put up a retrans station and monitor it for 3 days by the time youve got 3 days worth of batteries for the radios, the radios, food, water and the antenna rigs between 2 blokes theres not a lot of room left for things like swags n sleeping bags when your on foot.

you generally only take a couple of luxury items, I took my towel and 3 pairs of socks.

Disco300Tdi
31st March 2008, 12:22 PM
And the white pointer sharks, Australia has the largest in the world..:eek:

Xavie
31st March 2008, 01:38 PM
Just make sure you know what to do in an emergency and maybe get a first aid book when you get here as there is probably some differences in technique we use.

Spiders... not really an issue I find. I have been cleaning up my yard today and came across 3 snakes with one going for me as I thought he was a lose stick.....

Do get a good first aid kit though. I use mine just about every time I'm away even for a day trip.

Xav

cartm58
31st March 2008, 01:39 PM
you need to be as carefull as you can be anywhere in the world, there are always risks which can make you dead or injured.

for starters ignoring warning signs about crocs in water, jelly fish and going swimming.

driving at excessive speeds for conditions of road.

camping under gum trees where limbs can snap off and drop down and kill you while sleeping in your tent or car or sitting in your camp chair.

swimming while drinking.

standing on wet slippery rocks with king waves washing over you.

if you apply commonsense take precautions you should be fine

Grizzly_Adams
31st March 2008, 01:54 PM
Don't under-estimate the danger of rips and undertows in the surf.

If there's a flagged area with surf lifesavers there, swim there - no matter how tempting the other areas of the beach are.

A rip or undertow can drag you or any of your party quickly under without warning....

Don't go diving into water where you haven't checked for rocks or the depth of the water.

Common sense I know, but sometimes it can be lacking....

Grimace
31st March 2008, 02:16 PM
Australia is the worlds most poisonous country. We also have some of the big predators. Keep this in mind, but not in fear.

My best advice ontop of all the excellent advice you have already been given is, don't travel alone, organise a group and enjoy yourself.

In my limited outback experience the only thing that I recall ever being a harm to myself was the paper wasps.
They get ****ed of easily and go nuts (but only if your near their nest or a migrating swarm). If you do find yourself under atack a quick backstep in the same direction you just came from will generally see you being left alone.

I got stung on the bloody eyelid, and my lil sister and a fello 4wder got drilled by a **** load of them, but it was near one of the main rubbish pits where they are rather prominent.

Learn to analyse the intended camp/stop before getting out and venturing about. Look for any of the things you don't want to be near.

Take alot of good repelent :D

As for the ocean, there isn't really much you can do short of making sure you leg hasn't already been half hacked off (with regards to sharks).
It's all just down right bad luck to be attacked/stung, stay out of known shark infested waters and research what time of year to look out for box jellys and Iricongi jellyfish.

In saying all the above, the most dangerous thing you could do is drive a motor vehicle and you prob do that everyday so in perspective you have almost nothing to worry about.

Enjoy your time over in this great place I love to call home :)

Cheers
Grimace

Phil633
31st March 2008, 02:36 PM
All the advice above is good.

Also there is a book out called "See Australia and Die":o (don't know if it is in the UK) It sounds terrible but it is a collection incidents that have happened mainly to tourists.

If you you can find it, I would recommend a read, so you know what not to do.

45tr0
31st March 2008, 05:04 PM
Box Jellies: really only October to April is the main season. Carry a 2L bottle of cheap vinegar if you're down the beach, this will aid in neutralising the sting.


Just a note on vinegar - be careful to identify jellyfish before chucking the stuff about - Man-of-war jellyfish, and some Irikanji(?sp?) species will have the opposite reaction to vinegar, and inject much, much more harmful toxins.
Pays to be aware :)

dmdigital
31st March 2008, 05:15 PM
Do you think we've scared Jon from coming to Australia yet?

:Rolling:

p38arover
31st March 2008, 05:19 PM
All the advice above is good.

Also there is a book out called "See Australia and Die":o (don't know if it is in the UK) It sounds terrible but it is a collection incidents that have happened mainly to tourists.

If you you can find it, I would recommend a read, so you know what not to do.

Here's a preview: http://www2.skynews.com.au/books/pages/SeeAustraliaAndDie_050308.pdf

Yorkshire_Jon
31st March 2008, 05:24 PM
Do you think we've scared Jon from coming to Australia yet?

:Rolling:

Nah, I'll just live in the car!!!!

Seriously though, Im glad I asked the question - gives me (and no doubt others something to think about). Forewarned is forearmed and all that.

graceysdad
31st March 2008, 06:38 PM
Its really quiet simple up North, do not swim in rivers or billabongs, even swimming in the ocean is hazardous crocs are salt water too!, they are far more of a menace now then they were 20 years ago, jellyfish etc, stone fish, banded sea snakes, not to forget sharks, always turn your sleweping bag out before you get into it, spiders and other crawlies!, wear a big brimmed hat, plenty sunscreen, good first aid kit and a local first aid book, always carry plenty water, dont play with snakes poke them with sticks etc its a whole pile of common sense things really, these guys are spread far and wide on AULRO they will soon pass on the local dos and donts

p38arover
31st March 2008, 07:15 PM
Luckily Oz doesn't have any big predators so it's pretty safe.

No wolves, bears, lions, tigers, hippos, etc.

Just a few snakes, tiny little spiders, and humioungous and vicious drop bears.

Oh, don't dig for worms if you want to fish.

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/5.jpg

See Giant Gippsland Earthworm (http://www.australianfauna.com/giantgippslandearthworm.php)

crump
31st March 2008, 07:23 PM
Nah, I'll just live in the car!!!!

Seriously though, Im glad I asked the question - gives me (and no doubt others something to think about). Forewarned is forearmed and all that.

at least you wont be constantly bumping into people looking for James Herriot.;)

garryc
31st March 2008, 07:49 PM
The only thing I would like to add, as the other posts have covered most things, is the gnats or sand flies. I spent 3 years in Darwin recently and was well aware of the crocs, snakes etc. But the sand flies got me. :( I still have the scars to prove it. The sand flies or midges are VERY small but leave a blister up to one centimeter in diameter which then bleeds for weeks. My legs looked like a pizza on a few occasions. The first time I went fishing on the harbour and up into the mangrove creeks I put the insect repellent on after I had my sandals and hat on(I had long sleeved shirt and jeans on). The areas under the sandal straps, watchband and around the hat rim were covered in bites. If you go near water or mangroves, put your insect repellent on all areas that will be bare before you put your clothes on. I also got done like a dinner when camping at Dalhousie Springs on the Simpson Desert crossing. On arriving at Birdsville the lady at the caravan park said she advises all travellers NOT to camp at Dalhousie. regards

Reads90
31st March 2008, 08:11 PM
Jon
Don't worry about it. I drove all round aus and camped out every night for 7 months. And i am a pom who grew up with Steve Irwin going on about that anything that moves will kill you in Aus. But i have done all this and been living in Aus for nearly 3 years and i still have not seen a snake yet

As for spiders did not have any problems with them either. Just be carefull and you will be fine. As for mossie you need a good spay and that will sort you out.

But belive me you will be fine. I was . My misses is an Aussie and spent the first couple of weeks taking the pi** out of me and then you forget about the snakes and spiders and other stuff

Bush65
31st March 2008, 08:33 PM
The biggest danger from wildlife is swerving to miss the blighters in the middle of the road (or in the air) and many beside the road will try to cross at the last second as you approach. Be very careful near dawn or dusk and at night.

This is a real danger, and it is difficult to control natural instincts. Large animals will do much damage if you hit them however, and you wouldn't like some of them inside the cab with you - they have no respect.

weeds
31st March 2008, 08:43 PM
out on the simpson

these guys are friendly
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/1.jpg

these guys are too if you can catch one, i spent a whole day diving around the spinafex getting scratched to pieces
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/2.jpg

found this guy eating some road kill 'kangaroo', he was not keen to hang around
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/3.jpg

these guys do the bolt as soon as they see you, probabley scared they will get shot like there mates
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/4.jpg

p38arover
31st March 2008, 09:05 PM
these guys are friendly
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/03/1.jpg



Dunno, I find kids to be pretty scary things!

abaddonxi
31st March 2008, 09:17 PM
The biggest danger from wildlife is swerving to miss the blighters in the middle of the road (or in the air) and many beside the road will try to cross at the last second as you approach. Be very careful near dawn or dusk and at night.

This is a real danger, and it is difficult to control natural instincts. Large animals will do much damage if you hit them however, and you wouldn't like some of them inside the cab with you - they have no respect.

Excellent point, I've had one friend in an horrific accident and a friend's wife die as a result of wildlife or livestock. Fair few close calls myself.

Cheers
Simon

cdrtravis
31st March 2008, 09:21 PM
How careful do we really need to be??

Very - especially of WASPS

Probably more Poms raped murdered and pillaged by them then any blackfellas or the local fauna.


God, yes. Bloody wasps. My wife and I got stung and then some by a swarm in Mossman. I could have sworn that when they got you, they didn't so much sting you, as pull a piece of flesh out!

Stepho_62
31st March 2008, 10:43 PM
Just be aware as has already been mentioned and keep your eyes open. You get used to it eventually.

My wife had a barney with this bloke in the pool not long ago:eek:,

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b165/Woger_Wabbit/General/EasternBrowninPool.jpg
This other fella dug up her newly planted herb patch:mad:,

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b165/Woger_Wabbit/FNQ/Lizard1.jpg

and a couple of weeks ago whe went down to feed her chooks late one night only to find a python lurking about looking for a free feed. :D

Cheers,

RobHay
1st April 2008, 12:41 AM
Here is my 2 bits worth.
1.Don't make your swag/bed up and leave it, snakes and other nastys like to get in it. Of course if you do and you notice a blonde nubile nude in ya swag :eek:just tell ya missus you are feeling really tired and you gonna retire early ;)
2.Don't drive at dusk or early morning, if you can avoid it, we have these really big grasshoppers over here and they have no brains and like to commit hari-kari on the front of your vehicle. Not much fun if one comes through your windscreen and is trying to occupy the same space you are. So watch out for kangaroos. Same for pigs, if you hit a big razorback at 100klm/h tends to make them a tad cranky.

3. Latrines should be sited well away from your camp. There are things that live in the dark that just love to dig up yesterdays breakfast that you thought was well buried.

4.Camp fires should be well cleared. Not much fun having to fight a major bush fire in the middle of the night. Besides the local cockys (Farmers) will more than likely tar and feather you later.

5. DO NOT put your tent under that really lovely gum tree, more than one idiot has been killed by falling tree limbs.

6. Snakes have right of passage! You would be surprised by the number of fools you have been biten trying to pick up a snake. Australia is home to the Taipan the most venomous land snake in the world, we also have King Browns too, both of these make the Yank's Rattlesnake look like an overly large earthworm. Leave the blighters alone, throw things at them if you must, but from a safe distance and make sure you have a clear escape route when the damn thing gets upset with you.

7. Keep well clear of B Doubles, the drivers are mad, not really fun to get lodged between the 4th and 5th trailer as they come sliding around the corner doing 6000 mile an hour (Google B Double and RoadTrain) you will soon see what I mean.

8. Don't set up camp in that really lovely dry river bed, it is there for a purpose.

9. Not really wise to pick up hitch hikers, particularly if they are beardered and have wide staring eyes. Its okay to pick up Nubile Blondes but only after you have driven passes then a dozen or so times to make sure that there is not a bevy of male wannabees hiding in the scrubbery.:mad:

After all of this please feel free to enjoy our wonderful country, Oh it might pay to bring a band-aid or two as well.

Bigbjorn
1st April 2008, 08:51 AM
7. Keep well clear of B Doubles, the drivers are mad, not really fun to get lodged between the 4th and 5th trailer as they come sliding around the corner doing 6000 mile an hour (Google B Double and RoadTrain) you will soon see what I mean.



We old road train operators regard tourists as the most dangerous animal in the outback. Our justice system does not permit people to be shot for ignorance or stupidity though.

When a road train is approaching get right off the sealed portion of the road (assuming you are on a major sealed road) onto the shoulder, and slow down until the dust has settled enough for safety, as the RT won't, too bloody dangerous to be dropping up to 21+ axles down into the dirt on one side. Many of our outback roads that are sealed are only sealed to the width of one vehicle. Cost is the reason, long distances and low population means sealed roads are an unacceptably high cost to outback shire councils. Etiquette among road users is that cars/light vehicles drop half off the bitumen when approaching another car, and get totally off the bitumen onto the shoulder when approaching a truck.

Edit:- for the advice in the above paragraph, I assumed you were travelling on a single lane bitumen road. On a major highway with room for two vehicles on the sealed portion, of course there is no need to get half off the bitumen unless the approaching road train has a wandering trailer.

Avoid driving after dusk in kangaroo infested areas. Likewise much of our outback grazing country is unfenced. Hitting a half tonne steer with your passenger vehicle is not recommended. This would in most cases end your holiday.

29dinosaur
1st April 2008, 10:08 AM
We old road train operators regard tourists as the most dangerous animal in the outback. Our justice system does not permit people to be shot for ignorance or stupidity though.

When a road train is approaching get right off the sealed portion of the road (assuming you are on a major sealed road) onto the shoulder, and slow down until the dust has settled enough for safety, as the RT won't, too bloody dangerous to be dropping up to 21+ axles down into the dirt on one side. Many of our outback roads that are sealed are only sealed to the width of one vehicle. Cost is the reason, long distances and low population means sealed roads are an unacceptably high cost to outback shire councils. Etiquette among road users is that cars/light vehicles drop half off the bitumen when approaching another car, and get totally off the bitumen onto the shoulder when approaching a truck.

Avoid driving after dusk in kangaroo infested areas. Likewise much of our outback grazing country is unfenced. Hitting a half tonne steer with your passenger vehicle is not recommended.

What's it like to hit a cow, camel, etc with a road train? Does it just go splat? Do your attempt to slow at all? I've seen an aweful lot of truck skid amrks on WA roads up north - are they avoiding each other or what goes?

Good points though for poms or any other drongo who might think about taking on a road train....

Bigbjorn
1st April 2008, 11:22 AM
What's it like to hit a cow, camel, etc with a road train? Does it just go splat? Do your attempt to slow at all? I've seen an aweful lot of truck skid amrks on WA roads up north - are they avoiding each other or what goes?

Good points though for poms or any other drongo who might think about taking on a road train....

I never hit a camel, but did get a few cattle over the years. A big bullock(some are a tonne or more) can do considerable damage even to a heavy duty steel bull bar. Best to try to control your natural reactions and not swerve or brake as this could have you lose control and maybe get upside down and/or tangled up off road with the trailers. Try to hit them in line with a chassis rail as this will do least damage, or right in the middle of the bull bar. Some say get them with the outer edge or corner if you can and spin them off to the side, but this can bend the bar in on a tyre. Now try to remember this and do it whilst bouncing around at 100k's in the dirt and dust. Sheep and roos are no problem to a heavy truck. All animal contacts are unpleasant if the blood and guts get caught up underneath to rot and stink, or cook on the hot bits.

Bushwanderer
1st April 2008, 12:42 PM
Just make sure you know what to do in an emergency and maybe get a first aid book when you get here as there is probably some differences in technique we use.

Spiders... not really an issue I find. I have been cleaning up my yard today and came across 3 snakes with one going for me as I thought he was a lose stick.....

Do get a good first aid kit though. I use mine just about every time I'm away even for a day trip.

Xav

I agree with Xavie re knowing what 1st aid kit to carry & use.

On the other hand, when bushwalking (even when leading novices) I've rarely needed to use the kit, but when I did, the knowledge was crucial.

Best Wishes,

Bushwanderer
1st April 2008, 12:47 PM
Re the paper wasps etc:

"I've heard" (therefore reason to question) that more people are killed each year in Australia from the European bee (allergic reaction) than from sharks.

Bushwanderer
1st April 2008, 12:53 PM
The only thing I would like to add, as the other posts have covered most things, is the gnats or sand flies. I spent 3 years in Darwin recently and was well aware of the crocs, snakes etc. But the sand flies got me. :( I still have the scars to prove it. The sand flies or midges are VERY small but leave a blister up to one centimeter in diameter which then bleeds for weeks. My legs looked like a pizza on a few occasions. The first time I went fishing on the harbour and up into the mangrove creeks I put the insect repellent on after I had my sandals and hat on(I had long sleeved shirt and jeans on). The areas under the sandal straps, watchband and around the hat rim were covered in bites. If you go near water or mangroves, put your insect repellent on all areas that will be bare before you put your clothes on. I also got done like a dinner when camping at Dalhousie Springs on the Simpson Desert crossing. On arriving at Birdsville the lady at the caravan park said she advises all travellers NOT to camp at Dalhousie. regards

Hi Garryc,
This is probably a case of allergic reaction (& not from the beasties themselves) - I know because of my partner's experience. I suspect that your discomfort would have been much reduced by appropriate ingestion of antihistamines.

Bushwanderer
1st April 2008, 12:58 PM
Jon
snip
As for mossie you need a good spay and that will sort you out.
snip

Isn't that a bit drastic? :o

Re the aboriginals: I don't see any evidence that they are more likely to "go you" than other Australians (or tourists).

Bushwanderer
1st April 2008, 01:04 PM
I also like, Rob Hay's, Brian Heljm's & NM's advise.

Col.Coleman
1st April 2008, 10:39 PM
Watch the outback doco "Wolf Creek".

Michael2
2nd April 2008, 09:31 AM
Spiders :


There is only one poisonsous spider in Australia - the funnel web.

FIRST AID Compression Bandage

The Redback will hurt, but will only kill you if you're old and fragile, or a small child.

FIRST AID Ice pack

The white tail isn't poisonous, it's just got dirty fangs, a bit like getting bitten by a diseased mouse, the mouse itself isn't poisonous.

FIRST AID Wash with soapy water

So with this knowledge, you can feel free to pick up almost any spider in the country.

graceysdad
2nd April 2008, 09:45 AM
And watch out for joe blakes and drop bears

Grizzly_Adams
2nd April 2008, 09:53 AM
Spiders :


There is only one poisonsous spider in Australia - the funnel web.

FIRST AID Compression Bandage

The Redback will hurt, but will only kill you if you're old and fragile, or a small child.

FIRST AID Ice pack

The white tail isn't poisonous, it's just got dirty fangs, a bit like getting bitten by a diseased mouse, the mouse itself isn't poisonous.

FIRST AID Wash with soapy water

So with this knowledge, you can feel free to pick up almost any spider in the country.

Interesting facts however I would never EVER EVER recommend or imply to anyone that they should feel comfortable picking up a spider.

Best and simplest solution is to leave them alone because even if it isn't a normally lethal spider you may have an allergic reaction to it, in which case you're just as dead.

crump
2nd April 2008, 12:26 PM
Spiders :



There is only one poisonsous spider in Australia - the funnel web.

FIRST AID Compression Bandage

The Redback will hurt, but will only kill you if you're old and fragile, or a small child.

FIRST AID Ice pack

The white tail isn't poisonous, it's just got dirty fangs, a bit like getting bitten by a diseased mouse, the mouse itself isn't poisonous.

FIRST AID Wash with soapy water

So with this knowledge, you can feel free to pick up almost any spider in the country.

unless it happens to be one of the other 17 species of Australian spiders known to cause serious effects in humans, I think your definition of "poisonous" may need revision.

Redback
2nd April 2008, 12:27 PM
This is one of the funniest threads i've read in a long time:eek::eek:

I dunno how we have survived:unsure:

Baz.

weeds
2nd April 2008, 12:41 PM
And watch out for joe blakes and drop bears

and hoop snakes

29dinosaur
2nd April 2008, 12:48 PM
This is one of the funniest threads i've read in a long time:eek::eek:

I dunno how we have survived:unsure:

Baz.

Yes - typically strine type conversation is taking place. We sure like to take the mickey out of the poms in any way we can....

But statistics show that we're pretty safe from our nasty fauna. Only not very safe from one another when we have WMDs in our hands (our cars).

It would make interesting reading to know or survey how many here have been bitten by our nasty snakes/spiders/box jellyfish/crocodiles???

Personally never bitten by any of these really nasty types (but have been close many times and would have been if didn't have my wits about me). But of my family & acquaintances:
* 2 survived funnel web bites
* 2 survived tiger snake bites (1 worked with them)
* 1 died from brown snake bite (older relative many years ago)
* 1 survived black snake bite (stood on and felt beast taping away at his ankle.

It's scarey to think though of the number of colleagues, friends, relatives, school mates etc who have been killed on our roads or who may have suffered accidental death such as drowning.

To our English friend - please take the camping under our 'gum' trees seriously. 2 girls dies only a year or two back in one of our local forests when a branch came down on top of them.

Grizzly_Adams
2nd April 2008, 12:52 PM
To our English friend - please take the camping under our 'gum' trees seriously. 2 girls dies only a year or two back in one of our local forests when a branch came down on top of them.

Yes, our gum trees have the nasty habit of dropping what appear to be perfectly healthy branches.. and I'm not talking small branches either :eek:

Pedro_The_Swift
2nd April 2008, 12:53 PM
Yep, the large gums might look as healthy as Mr Gates's bank account,, but WILL drop perfectly sound (large) branches for no reason(crump?).

Yorkshire_Jon
2nd April 2008, 05:24 PM
Thanks guys - Clearly I deserve to have the p**s taken out of me - POM doing his best to make sure he gets home after the event and all that!!!

Very interesting and funny read - good stuff.

I am St John Emergency first aid trained but I suspect that may not count for much on your side of the pond - Most of my training is power distribution and construction industry biased. Flash burns and crushing injuries are probably the least of my worries!!

Now time to google pictures of gum trees!

Phil633
3rd April 2008, 03:03 PM
Here's a preview: http://www2.skynews.com.au/books/pages/SeeAustraliaAndDie_050308.pdf


Yep that's the one Ron.

Jon Did you read the link yet. One of the guys in the Irkandji story was from Driffield also.

Yorkshire_Jon
3rd April 2008, 05:30 PM
Yep that's the one Ron.

Jon Did you read the link yet. One of the guys in the Irkandji story was from Driffield also.

Thanks for the link - someone suggested this book a few weeks ago. I looked then but couldnt find it. I'll read it all now Ive got it, but have read the jelly page re the man from Driffield - I didnt know of him. What a terrible way to go.

carjunkieanon
9th April 2008, 01:00 PM
Saw hoop snakes were mentioned but not described.

Since the desert is so hot, these snakes have developed a technique whereby they put their tail in their mouth, form their body into a loop and roll.

Gets them up off the hot sand and they can pick up a fair turn of speed. I had one of them keep up with the car for a good few kilometers before it speed up down hill and left me behind.

Poisonous too.

r

p38arover
9th April 2008, 01:47 PM
Saw hoop snakes were mentioned but not described.

Since the desert is so hot, these snakes have developed a technique whereby they put their tail in their mouth, form their body into a loop and roll.

Gets them up off the hot sand and they can pick up a fair turn of speed. I had one of them keep up with the car for a good few kilometers before it speed up down hill and left me behind.

Bulldust! Don't believe him. :mad:















They don't get up to that sort of speed. :D

Bigbjorn
9th April 2008, 01:51 PM
Saw hoop snakes were mentioned but not described.

Since the desert is so hot, these snakes have developed a technique whereby they put their tail in their mouth, form their body into a loop and roll.

Gets them up off the hot sand and they can pick up a fair turn of speed. I had one of them keep up with the car for a good few kilometers before it speed up down hill and left me behind.

Poisonous too.

r

There was reputed to have been one on Speewah station that was so big that the groove it left in the sand became the Darling River.

carjunkieanon
9th April 2008, 02:55 PM
:arms:

PhilipA
9th April 2008, 08:13 PM
Funny, I just camped the last 6 days at Cotter campground only 18Km from the centre of Canberra.
There were 3 dead roos and 1 dead wombat between Mt Stromlo and the campground, which is about 10Km tops.
I continually had bees thinking I was a flower and landing on me. Just stay still and they finally decide you are not a flower.
The last morning I had a very large spider sharing the shower. It was not a huntsman and had big mandibles. In Sydney I would have said a Sydney Rock. I dropped a bit of water on it to encourage it away from the feet.

And the Cockies were hanging around for a feed. I recommend that you do not try to hand feed them as you may lose a finger.
We become blase after a while.
Regards Philip A

Bush65
9th April 2008, 10:28 PM
Funny, I just camped the last 6 days at Cotter campground only 18Km from the centre of Canberra.
There were 3 dead roos and 1 dead wombat between Mt Stromlo and the campground, which is about 10Km tops.
I continually had bees thinking I was a flower and landing on me. Just stay still and they finally decide you are not a flower.
The last morning I had a very large spider sharing the shower. It was not a huntsman and had big mandibles. In Sydney I would have said a Sydney Rock. I dropped a bit of water on it to encourage it away from the feet.

And the Cockies were hanging around for a feed. I recommend that you do not try to hand feed them as you may lose a finger.
We become blase after a while.
Regards Philip A
Re funnel webs, they do have large fangs, but for positive identification, the funnel web spider has prominent twin spinners (for spinning it's web).

MickS
9th April 2008, 10:54 PM
If you can, grab a hold of these DVD's - Russell Coight - Select a site (http://www.russellcoight.com/) - some very sound advice from Russell there.....;)

Words of wisdom from Russell, when describing the Blue Mountains -
"But what they lack in height they make up for in elevation".

And -
"Australia is a land as vast as it is big" or "Australia. A Land as ancient as it is old".

He's good on the history side of things too -
"The Mitchell Track, named after its discoverer, Mitchell Track."

Have a great trip...:)

Yorkshire_Jon
10th April 2008, 02:08 AM
Thanks for the DVD reference. One of the DVDs is magically working is way over to me now... Will watch with about 7 months worth of envy!!

procrastination inc
10th April 2008, 02:26 AM
you generally only take a couple of luxury items, I took my towel...

Hey you sass that hoopy Blknight, there's a frood who really knows where his towel is.

BBC
11th April 2008, 12:25 AM
on? try under and thats all there is, what your wearing the 1/2 body length sheet of 6mm foam rubber and the hootchie (thin sheet of plastic). When you get given a radio and orders to get to top of yon hill put up a retrans station and monitor it for 3 days by the time youve got 3 days worth of batteries for the radios, the radios, food, water and the antenna rigs between 2 blokes theres not a lot of room left for things like swags n sleeping bags when your on foot.

you generally only take a couple of luxury items, I took my towel and 3 pairs of socks.


How come 'Chooks' end up travelling so light? Sounds like a dream come true to a Sapper....:p

madmagpie05
18th April 2008, 09:09 PM
Hi Jon, try not to come out here when there is an ashes tour on, it only adds to the pain.
But seriously, Go easy on the sun for a while. It burns like hell until you get use to it. Hat, sun screen, long sleeves and go easy on the tan.
Another great DVD to get your hands on is Billy Connely's world tour of Australia, it will explain a lot about this country as well.
Enjoy your time here and remember to bring warm and cool clothing, middle of the desert gets bloody cold at night, depending on how far south you get it gets cold as well.
Another thing. All ways carry water in the bush with you.
Madmagpie:wasntme: