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isuzurover
16th June 2008, 04:47 PM
I was given a home brew kit for my Birthday, and we started our first brew on the weekend.

Anyone here brew their own? I know you do Andy ;) (keen to try some).

What styles do you guys Brew?

Anyone brew Belgian style beer (Duvel/Chimey style beer)?

I know that in Germany, homebrewers don't use any sugar (as by law, "Beer" can only contain malt, hops, yeats and water). I assume they buy malted barley and use that. I don't know how the bottle fermentation works though. Anyone know if it is possible to brew without sugar here???

Btw - In Germany, there is a limit on how much homebrew you can make per year. When someone reaches their quota, they throw a few grains of rice in each batch after that, so it isn't "real" beer anymore, and therefore isn't covered by the quota. :D

Mick-Kelly
16th June 2008, 06:01 PM
Dont brew myself at the moment but i have done in the past. Used to make a ripper mead. When i get things settled down a bit here (sheds etc.) i will be starting up again. Gotta have a binge drink while i,m playing with the old landy in the shed. :eek:

Chilly
16th June 2008, 07:10 PM
Hi mate,

Just got myself a home brew kit too. Currently making my first brew of a Porterhouse.

Interested to pick up any tips too.

Bigbjorn
16th June 2008, 07:45 PM
Until you get the hang of it, use Coopers kits. They are foolproof and palatable. I like Real Ale, Draught, and Stout. I use either a kilo or 1.5 kilos of raw sugar or brew enhancer. Absolute cleanliness of equipment and bottles is absolutely necessary.

Stepho_62
16th June 2008, 08:08 PM
G'day Ben

Been brewing for the best part of 20 years. There are purists n plodders. Not sure where I sit on that scale but my advise is pretty simple.

To start out with, by the kits in a can. Brew something simple like a draught or an Ale. Follow the instructions and you can't go wrong.

There is a couple of simple rules,

Rule 1 Clean,
Rule 2 Clean
N if you missed rules 1 & 2 guess what rule 3 is?

Clean.

Once you have built your first brew using sugar and following the instructions you can start to experiment.

The kit or Wert (pronounced Wort) is a boiled down version of the same thing that CUB puts into its 20,000l fermenters. If you want a good book to read grab a copy of "The complete guide to Home Brewing in Australia" by Laurie Strachan

Using the pre prepared kits you can build a very good quality brew but because of the quantities brewed per batch (usually 31 x 750Ml bottles) being able to do it consistently is key to success.

Success comes from having a robust repeatable process. I brew doing the following;


Sterilise everything using 1 tablespoon of household bleach per 4 litres of water,
Swap the sugar out for Dextrose (brewers sugar, made from Corn)
Take care with the temperature, in Tasmania I used to use 4 litres of boiling water and 18 litres of cold water. Here in QLD I'm using 1 litre of boiling water and 21 litres of cold water.
I guess it goes without saying that the cleaner the water the better so if u can nik RO or Distilled water from your iminent colleagues in the schools of science then do so you will get a much better result than with tap water.Thats enough for now, don't want to scare you. Have a go n tell me how you get on.

Cheers,

abaddonxi
16th June 2008, 08:15 PM
<snip>

I know that in Germany, homebrewers don't use any sugar (as by law, "Beer" can only contain malt, hops, yeats and water). I assume they buy malted barley and use that. I don't know how the bottle fermentation works though. Anyone know if it is possible to brew without sugar here???

<snip>

And one part William Butler Yeats:


I have known more men destroyed by the desire to have wife and child and to keep them in comfort than I have seen destroyed by drink and harlots.


:D

Cheers
Simon

duncanw
16th June 2008, 08:56 PM
We've brewed beer for about 8 years now, it's an aquired taste and like St3pho_62 said you need to make sure that your gear is clean because bateria love the warm environment.

Coopers are a good start, I've messed around for years with different combos of sugars, extracts and adding a whole range of weird and wonderfull stuff. But I found that its best to buy two cans of beer and stick them in the same brew, no extra sugar or anything like that.

Then there is your setup, you will probably be using bottles to start with which are a real pain to fill and cap when you have a 20 litre brew but unless you want to fork out about $500 on a keg system most beginners use bottles, oh don't make 40 liter brews, or if you do get 4 cans, the key is to get a beer with a nice body.

We used to use bottles and have just moved onto a keg system so I have 118 640ml bottles going for $50 if you want them, and you can have a little taste while your here too :D

I've had more success with darker beers, stouts and bitters. For some reason I can never quite get the lighter pale ales or pilsners to turn out perfect.

Oh and don't go into this thinking you can replicate your favourite drink or you will be dissapointed (unless its VB ), when you get better at it you will find that the stuff in pubs is rubbish and you can taste the chemicals more.

isuzurover
17th June 2008, 01:37 PM
Thanks for the tips guys! I already knew about cleanliness though! ;)

Currently brewing the Coopers lager that came with the kit. Will move on to ales next, as I prefer to drink them.

Chilly - porterHOUSE is a cut of meat, Porter is a German style of dark beer which tastes very nice (Hoepfner Porter was one of my favourite beers at our "local" when we lived in Germany). And in Utah we found a beer called "Polygamy Porter" :D

Duncan - I like your method of using 2 tins of beer (and I assume 2 sachets of yeast?). I remember a guy telling me his beer was half pale ale and half stout - I thought he used half a tin of each, but it sounds like he used your method. Will have to try it. Duncan - are your bottled the brown plastic ones? I have a bunch of them, but if I need more I will get onto you. I know someone who uses plastic coke (1.25L) bottles - anyone else tried that?

maca
17th June 2008, 02:34 PM
There are tons of places on the interweb that you might find useful tips and contacts.
Here are two:

Homebrew - OCAU Wiki (http://www.overclockers.com.au/wiki/Homebrew)
(Excellent links at bottom of page)

AussieHomeBrewer.com (http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/)
(A good little forum)

For cleaning I use the magical pink stuff that most home brew shops sell, it doesn't smell and is a lot easier to rinse off than bleach.

Personally I go for the bitters but me best mate is into dark ales, we also do lots of ginger beer and apple cider for the girls (we have also been known to partake as well).
Don't worry too much about all the fancy stuff, it still tastes pretty good following the instructions of the side of the coopers and Brigalow cans.

The only think that I don't like is cleaning all the bloody tallies. A cordless drill and a long bottle brush is the best method that I have used, however I have seen modified dishwashers that worked pretty good aswell (but unfortunately I don't have one).


Just beware: you WILL gain weight.

duncanw
17th June 2008, 03:44 PM
About 40 bottles are dark green ones, the rest are dark brown. they are all glass bottles.

No I use just one sachet of yeast with the two cans. Although you can try using both, there isn't really any rules with homebrew :D just learn the hard way

We tried coke bottles once but they blew up, maybe I put too much sugar in the bottles but I was never brave enough to try it again and lose my precious beer.

numpty
17th June 2008, 04:28 PM
G'day Ben


The kit or Wert (pronounced Wort) is a boiled down version of the same thing that CUB puts into its 20,000l fermenters. If you want a good book to read grab a copy of "The complete guide to Home Brewing in Australia" by Laurie StrachanCheers,

Actually it is wort (pronounced wert);)

Like others, I've been brewing for 20 years and have never made a bad batch:D

Some good advice here and everyone has their favorites. Don't be afraid to experiment, although I find the ales (including stouts) and bitters are the pick.

Stepho_62
17th June 2008, 05:51 PM
Actually it is wort (pronounced wert);)



:oops2::lol2::Rolling: Jeez I can't believe I wrote that. One of my favs is a coopers stout kit, with 500g of dark malt and 500g Latctose. This produces what is traditionally known as a "milk stout" not dis similar to Guinness. :BigThumb:

LandyAndy
17th June 2008, 06:20 PM
Hi Ben
As soon as you can afford to invest in a keg system.Not only will it save time in brewing and steralising the beer quality is so much higher as you dont rely on sugar for a secondary fermentation,the C02 bottle does it for you.
I do low carb brews,get diatose in 750gm bags and a sachet of dry enzyme(ex homebrew shop).I use SaFFALE yeast(the blue packet) plus the supplied yeast.The Saff yeasts contain an enzyme that solidify most of the dregs into a cake at the bottom of the fermenter.I no longer have a homebrew that bloats me and has a nice dry style.
I brew 2 brews at once,leave in the fermenters for 2 weeks min,then into the kegs.I have 4 kegs,each holds a standard brew.Would like anothe 2 kegs to age the beer further.
My 2 favorites at the moment are both Coopers,European Lager(Hieneken style) and Cerveza(Corona Style).In summer Coopers Canadian Blonde is nice,bit light as a winter beer.Coopers Pale ale is OK too,not as good as the European Lager.I use the diatose with all 4.ALWAYS TURN OUT GOD PUB QUALITY BEER.
In winter I like to experimint a bit with the heavier brews,Muntons do some real nice stuff.Cream style stouts and ales.For these I go the recomended booster kit and yeast that the brew shops have.I get these from Perth,there is a great Brewshop in Maddington,just down from Mcdonalds on the Hwy,the brewshop on Welshpool rd or the one in Joondalup depending where I am.All 3 are very helpful.
Andrew

isuzurover
17th June 2008, 11:07 PM
Thanks Andy - great tips! I know the place on Welshpool rd, will have to drop in.

Low carb beer - what's that??? :confused::D:confused::D;) I'm not an American...

Tombie
17th June 2008, 11:28 PM
Hi mate,

Just got myself a home brew kit too. Currently making my first brew of a Porterhouse.

Interested to pick up any tips too.

Your brewing STEAK... :eek: :wasntme:


But seriously... Let us know how it turns out!!!

rovercare
18th June 2008, 03:49 AM
Just had a n operator drop me in a bottle of his home made port to try, mmmmmmmmm:cool:

Gotta get my still going when I get back home and get the spirits happening:D, I've thought about home brew plenty of times, seeing as I usually go through a slab or 2/8 days, but seems alot of work................and cleaning:(

Planning on displacing some of the beer with spirits to lessen costs, when I came back from working away, I was renovating my other house, Was drinking a bottle every 2 days:eek:, don't wanna be doing that much again:angel:

Tombie
18th June 2008, 04:09 AM
Just had a n operator drop me in a bottle of his home made port to try, mmmmmmmmm:cool:

Gotta get my still going when I get back home and get the spirits happening:D, I've thought about home brew plenty of times, seeing as I usually go through a slab or 2/8 days, but seems alot of work................and cleaning:(

Planning on displacing some of the beer with spirits to lessen costs, when I came back from working away, I was renovating my other house, Was drinking a bottle every 2 days:eek:, don't wanna be doing that much again:angel:

Yeah, mates brother runs a still here... :cool:

Makes a nice drop or 3...

Vodka, Scotch.... Paint stripper :angel:

Redback
18th June 2008, 06:18 AM
Thanks Andy - great tips! I know the place on Welshpool rd, will have to drop in.

Low carb beer - what's that??? :confused::D:confused::D;) I'm not an American...

Ben have a look at these recipies, this is from my local Homebrew shop, Whats Brewing

Keg Bible (http://whatsbrewing.com.au/pages/recipelist.html)

If after you do a good homebrew you like it, as Andy has suggested go for the keg system, it is much easier, less fuss and from the time you start a brew to your first taste of your brew:beer:, it's around 9 to 10 days, where as bottling is 4 to 5 weeks, mans not a camel:twobeers::BigThumb:

This will give you an idea of what a keg system looks like
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/bazzar/thekeg007.jpg
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/bazzar/OldKowenHomestead024.jpg
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/


Baz.

isuzurover
18th June 2008, 11:06 AM
Thanks Baz! (not sure about the last pic :eek: :confused: ).

So you still do the first fermentation in a normal plastic fermenter - then transfer to the keg???

Matt - I know a few people who have stills, both here and in Germany - some of them make some really good stuff, including one guy who makes something almost indistinguishable from a good scotch whisky. It is legal in Germany, which is cool.

Got to be careful you don't make any methanol though... Well I suppose you could chuck in the petrol tank!

rovercare
18th June 2008, 12:06 PM
Got to be careful you don't make any methanol though... Well I suppose you could chuck in the petrol tank!

Stick it in the lawn mower;)

Redback
18th June 2008, 04:27 PM
Thanks Baz! (not sure about the last pic :eek: :confused: ).

So you still do the first fermentation in a normal plastic fermenter - then transfer to the keg???

Matt - I know a few people who have stills, both here and in Germany - some of them make some really good stuff, including one guy who makes something almost indistinguishable from a good scotch whisky. It is legal in Germany, which is cool.

Got to be careful you don't make any methanol though... Well I suppose you could chuck in the petrol tank!

Yes Ben, what i do is before i transfer it to the keg, i lager the wort (clear it) to do this you transfer the wort into another fermenter, add 3 teaspoons of sugar, and stir lightly then let it sit for 1 to 2 days then transfer it to the keg.
This clears the beer so when it's been carbonated and you pull your first beer, it's as clear as a beer from the pub:BigThumb:

I also have a still:D

Baz.

maca
18th June 2008, 04:43 PM
Sorry to hijack the thread, but does anyone have any good info on how to start with a still. From building to stilling.

Internet sites, PDF's, general hints etc...

I have found a fair bit of info on the web, but I want to see what other members have used/found.


Only for stilling stuff for perfumes ofcourse, wink, wink.

Redback
18th June 2008, 05:20 PM
I just bought one from a Homebrew shop, making one was just to hard and dearer than buying one.

Buy the urn type, saves money and aggrovation.

Baz.

isuzurover
19th June 2008, 08:07 PM
Hmm - well - the first brew may be a disaster. Doing our best to cut down electricity usage (WA gas crisis) we haven't been heating the house. The brew was in the warmest room and surrounded in sleeping bags and blankets. Just checked and it is 16-18 deg.

What's the go - if we raise the temp now will the yeast pick back up? Or is that it?

LandyAndy
19th June 2008, 08:36 PM
Hi Ben
Is it still bubbling???
Should start out "busy" then settle to a slow bubble.
I havent started wrapping my fermenters or using the brew belts yet.Mine are in the spare room and I bet they are colder than yours!!!!
Just checked the stickers,14deg and still slowly bubling.
Slow brews are much better than quickies!!!! In summer my beer quality drops off,need an old fridge and a temp switch to cool the brews.
The Saff yeast will brew over a better temp range than the supplied.
Andrew

LandyAndy
19th June 2008, 08:42 PM
Hey Baz
Over here we call that racking!!!!
Anyhow,get into the Saffale yeast(blue packet) you wont need to rack,or lager.I go fermenter into the keg.I do leave a week or two longer in the fermenters when I keg it it is already totaly clear.
I still put the yeast supplied with the can into the fermenter,plus the Saff yeast.All the dregs form a solid cake at the bottom of the fermenter,its great stuff.
Andrew

LandyAndy
19th June 2008, 08:52 PM
Hi Ben
Low carb,less sugar both in brewing and residual in the brew,a bit more waistline/diabetic friendly.
Its still full strength beer,much drier in taste as the sugars get eaten up further.
Some of the sugars in the homebrew sugars are un-diegestable by the yeast and are there to provide sweetness.
The diatose and dry enzyme work real well together:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:
There are many off the shelf Low carb beers available in bottleshops these days,all aimed at the same target.A low carb beer with full strenght/taste,have a look.
Andrew

isuzurover
19th June 2008, 09:01 PM
Hi Ben
Is it still bubbling???
Should start out "busy" then settle to a slow bubble.
I havent started wrapping my fermenters or using the brew belts yet.Mine are in the spare room and I bet they are colder than yours!!!!
Just checked the stickers,14deg and still slowly bubling.
Slow brews are much better than quickies!!!! In summer my beer quality drops off,need an old fridge and a temp switch to cool the brews.
The Saff yeast will brew over a better temp range than the supplied.
Andrew

Hi Andy - Thanks for the info!

I haven't pulled the top off to check. It haven't noticed it bubbling out the airlock, but it has been holding temp at 18-20 until the cold weather hit.

LandyAndy
19th June 2008, 09:16 PM
Hi Ben
When you first start out a Specific Gravity measurement realy helps.Involves taking measurements with a hydrometer at the start and towards the finish of brewing.
Most cans tell you the aproximate start and finish SGs,but it varies greatly with the sugars used.
I havent SGed my brews in many years.
Andrew

isuzurover
20th June 2008, 12:42 AM
Hi Ben
When you first start out a Specific Gravity measurement realy helps.Involves taking measurements with a hydrometer at the start and towards the finish of brewing.
Most cans tell you the aproximate start and finish SGs,but it varies greatly with the sugars used.
I havent SGed my brews in many years.
Andrew

Was 1031 at the start. Will take another reading on the weekend.

Redback
20th June 2008, 08:05 AM
Hi Ben that low temp won't hurt, it will just take a bit longer, as for it not bubbling, that could be because it's not sealed, as long as there's a build up at the top (brown crusty layer) it's working.

You can still bring up the temp and it will be OK, give it a stir when you do and look to see if the wort has bubbles rising from the bottom, that's an indication it's working, also pour some of the wort into a glass from the tap and have a taste, that will give you an idea how it's going too and don't be put off buy the smell, sometimes brews can smell off, when actually there not.

Don't worry too much and wait till it's ready to bottle and you've had a taste again before giving up on it, i've had these situations and it's ended up a good brew.

Baz.

duncanw
20th June 2008, 09:53 AM
You can get lower temp yeast, I'm not sure what its called but if you go to your local homebrew shop they will know what your on about.

Edit: It's normal for it to stop bubbling after a few days in the first barrel.

D3Jon
20th June 2008, 11:45 AM
Maybe at the next WA AULROians meeting we should all swap recipes and bring a few tasters! :D It seems most of us (including myself) brew our own!

I'm still with bottles at the moment, used to have a cheap keg system when I was much younger in the UK. Started brewing beer again here about a year ago and went down the bottle route first to see if I was still interested before spending $500 on a twin keg system + a contract for C02 bottles.

I don't find bottles too much trouble as I bought a bottle washer and drying tree, although simply siphoning it into a keg and waiting a few days rather than weeks before its ready does have it's advantages. :)

I mainly brew stout and have experimented quite a bit with darker ales, but I prefer stouts, I can recommend "big mans" stout recipe as per the brew sheet available free from Brew West in Joondalup.

I'm thinking of going to a keg system as I've found out that disposable C02 bottles have become available in WA, and I've already got a spare fridge (in the workshop ;)) I think the only downside with a keg system is not knowing how much you've drunk until the keg runs out - and having to be self disciplined and not having a quick 'half' on a lunchtime as you pass the beer tap! :D:D:D

Jon

isuzurover
20th June 2008, 12:10 PM
Thanks for the advice guys! Will let you know how it turns out. I am a bit concerned by the "bubbling" issue though.

When I started the brew:
As the weather was cold, I threw the yeast in at about 31-32deg, then sealed it. I tested the airlock (press the sides) and the levels took 30 secs or so to equalise again.

Over the first night, moisture formed on inside of the lid, and the airlock was not level (meaning there was a slight pressure inside the fermenter), but I have never actually seen bubbles coming out. It stayed at 28 for the first day, then slowly dropped down to 16 over 3-4 days. The brown residue that Baz mentioned seems to be present.

I will do a taste/sg test tomorrow.


Jon - sounds like a GREAT idea!


Here are some pics of the German method. Note - NO SUGAR!!! Just (malted) Barley, hops, yeast, and water. Looks like a fair bit more work, but would be interesting to try, at least once.
Meine Heimbrauerei (http://www.ichfindmich.net/bier/)
(If anyone needs a translation let me know)
But basically - STERILISE EVERYTHING - crush barley - mix with hot water (mash) - filter - do an "iodine test" (??? anyone???) - cook the mash/wort with the chosen hops - filter again - put in the fermenter and throw in the yeast.

Redback
20th June 2008, 03:49 PM
Thanks for the advice guys! Will let you know how it turns out. I am a bit concerned by the "bubbling" issue though.

When I started the brew:
As the weather was cold, I threw the yeast in at about 31-32deg, then sealed it. I tested the airlock (press the sides) and the levels took 30 secs or so to equalise again.

Over the first night, moisture formed on inside of the lid, and the airlock was not level (meaning there was a slight pressure inside the fermenter), but I have never actually seen bubbles coming out. It stayed at 28 for the first day, then slowly dropped down to 16 over 3-4 days. The brown residue that Baz mentioned seems to be present.

I will do a taste/sg test tomorrow.


Jon - sounds like a GREAT idea!


Here are some pics of the German method. Note - NO SUGAR!!! Just (malted) Barley, hops, yeast, and water. Looks like a fair bit more work, but would be interesting to try, at least once.
Meine Heimbrauerei (http://www.ichfindmich.net/bier/)
(If anyone needs a translation let me know)
But basically - STERILISE EVERYTHING - crush barley - mix with hot water (mash) - filter - do an "iodine test" (??? anyone???) - cook the mash/wort with the chosen hops - filter again - put in the fermenter and throw in the yeast.

Malt is the best stuff to use, liquid malt for dark ales and powered malt for lagers and pils, use a power boost 1/2 kilo malt 1/2 kilo dextrose, or just 1kg malt, it's gives it a malty flavour and improves the taste:D

I use malt.

Baz.

isuzurover
21st June 2008, 05:07 PM
Well looks like thinge are on track. Took the lid off, and it is bubbling slowly, has an SG of 1010-1011, and most importantly, actually TASTES like beer.

Will give it a few more days before bottling though.

Thanks for all the advice guys!

101RRS
22nd June 2008, 04:37 PM
Ok - lets cut to the chase here - interested in home brewing but only if it is possible to make VBs or Crownies - not interested in anything else.

Can it be done - there is the Coopers kit what about a VB kit or a Crownie kit?:)

duncanw
22nd June 2008, 06:59 PM
you can, at least if you stuff up its still better than vb :p

Jovial Monk Home Brew Shop (http://www.jovialmonk.com.au/kits.htm)

MORGANS AUSTRALIAN BITTER
VB style.

MORGANS AUSTRALIAN MID 3.5
A Carlton Mid style concentrate.

101RRS
22nd June 2008, 07:01 PM
you can, at least if you stuff up its still better than vb :p



AND WHAT IS WRONG WITH VBs:mad:

Bigbjorn
22nd June 2008, 07:47 PM
AND WHAT IS WRONG WITH VBs:mad:

Well, it is made tasteless so no ones taste will be offended. My late F-I-L used to call all Carlton beers "Surfside Sex", f---ing near water.

101RRS
22nd June 2008, 08:09 PM
Well, it is made tasteless so no ones taste will be offended. My late F-I-L used to call all Carlton beers "Surfside Sex", f---ing near water.

And as I said - WHAT IS WRONG WITH VBs:mad:

LandyAndy
22nd June 2008, 08:23 PM
Hi Garry
Look up DIY microbreweries in your area.
They are everywhere in cities.
Basically they are proffesional breweries where you go and do a brew using their gear.They look after it then you go in and bottle into stubbies that are ready to drink.If you prefer cans I have even seen one in Joondalup where you can can your brew!!!!
Much dearer than a full brew at home,but still cheaper than the bottle shop.
They can copy most comercial brews better than you can at home.
Called in and had a look at a few in Perth,hell of an atmosphere,busy as a Pub during happy hour!!!! Seems a bunch of mates get together and do a mega brew,sharing in the work,costs and CARTONS OF STUBBIES!!!
Andrew

d@rk51d3
22nd June 2008, 08:23 PM
To maintain optimum brewing temps, why not plumb in an aquarium heater or two?

A little trick I've read about for settling the brew, is to drop the fermenter into a chest freezer for a day or so. (don't let it freeze). The cold temps force the impurities to the bottom. - untested by me.:angel:

As regards bottles, I've used 600lm - 1.25l soft drink bottles. They seem to work a treat, but just require a little extra sugar when bottling. Apparently some of the gas discharges through the plastic.

Not as traditional as glass bottles, I know, but quite convenient.

LandyAndy
22nd June 2008, 08:43 PM
Try a packet of Saffale yeast in your next brew,I throw the supplied yeast and a packet of the Saffale(BLUE PACKET,havent tried the Safflager Yellow)
You wont look back,by time its finished fermenting the brew is as clear as it is when you drink it!!!! All the dregs settle into a firm semi solid cake at the bottom of the fermenter.
Try it,it really surprised me when tried it at the reccomendation of my homebrew supplier!!!
Used it every brew since!!!
I used to do plastic bottles too,much safer than the new glass bottles that are very weak compared to the old "king browns"
Keg only these days
Andrew

isuzurover
22nd June 2008, 09:14 PM
Try a packet of Saffale yeast in your next brew,I throw the supplied yeast and a packet of the Saffale(BLUE PACKET,havent tried the Safflager Yellow)
You wont look back,by time its finished fermenting the brew is as clear as it is when you drink it!!!! All the dregs settle into a firm semi solid cake at the bottom of the fermenter.
Try it,it really surprised me when tried it at the reccomendation of my homebrew supplier!!!
Used it every brew since!!!
I used to do plastic bottles too,much safer than the new glass bottles that are very weak compared to the old "king browns"
Keg only these days
Andrew

Thanks for all the great tips Andy - not sure if I will try the saffale yeast though - as I like cloudy beer!!! Might try doing one brew with it though, just to see what it is like.

LandyAndy
23rd June 2008, 08:10 PM
Hi Ben
You will get to TRY MINE ONEDAY:D:D:D:D:D
Rovacraft tell me its this week for the nanocom,yes I keep hearing that for lots of weeks.Also ordered my hoses etc from them.Looking at Friday if its raining and cant grade,or saturday to do the parts run.(ASSUMING THEY ARE IN STOCK)
Andrew

d@rk51d3
23rd June 2008, 08:41 PM
I used to do plastic bottles too,much safer than the new glass bottles that are very weak compared to the old "king browns"


I remember hearing (years ago) that they started making new bottles with thinner glass in the neck. The purpose being that the necks would snap when a homebrewer would bottle / cap his brew.

Forcing you to buy (crap) beer.:2up::thumbsdown:

isuzurover
23rd June 2008, 10:28 PM
Hi Ben
You will get to TRY MINE ONEDAY:D:D:D:D:D
Rovacraft tell me its this week for the nanocom,yes I keep hearing that for lots of weeks.Also ordered my hoses etc from them.Looking at Friday if its raining and cant grade,or saturday to do the parts run.(ASSUMING THEY ARE IN STOCK)
Andrew

Let me know when Andy, you can always drop in here for a beer. Not homebrew though - bottled it tonight.

Really need to get the shed finished. But maybe the weekend after next I will be able to come down. Looking forward to trying yours.


EDIT:
Still knowone here who brews belgian (style) beer???

When we were last there we had a competition to find the strongest beer. I think it was 15.1% Can I just mix a dark beer and light beer malt and throw a heap of sugar in????

Redback
24th June 2008, 06:47 AM
Let me know when Andy, you can always drop in here for a beer. Not homebrew though - bottled it tonight.

Really need to get the shed finished. But maybe the weekend after next I will be able to come down. Looking forward to trying yours.


EDIT:
Still knowone here who brews belgian (style) beer???

When we were last there we had a competition to find the strongest beer. I think it was 15.1% Can I just mix a dark beer and light beer malt and throw a heap of sugar in????

I did one Ben, not bad, but not really something i would brew a lot.

Try it you may like it.

BELGIUM'S BRUISER
*STELLA ARTOIS
1 can Beermaker's Czech Pilsener
1 Kg light malt
15g Stickelbrackt Hops
(Munton's Gold Yeast)


Baz.

isuzurover
24th June 2008, 11:03 AM
I did one Ben, not bad, but not really something i would brew a lot.

Try it you may like it.

BELGIUM'S BRUISER
*STELLA ARTOIS
1 can Beermaker's Czech Pilsener
1 Kg light malt
15g Stickelbrackt Hops
(Munton's Gold Yeast)


Baz.

Sorry Baz, should have specified NOT stella - not really fussed.

More something along the lines of this:
http://www.saveur-biere.com/images/chimay-bleu.jpg
or this:
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/06/248.jpg

At $8+ per stubbie in OZ I am certainly not going to buy it. Costs less than e1 per stubbie in Belgium.

Redback
24th June 2008, 12:36 PM
Sorry Baz, should have specified NOT stella - not really fussed.

More something along the lines of this:

At $8+ per stubbie in OZ I am certainly not going to buy it. Costs less than e1 per stubbie in Belgium.

I've tried the Chimay and a Raseberry beer, not something i'd buy on a regular basis, haven't seen a homebrew recipe for them though.

OK i found this

Belgian Tripel
2 x Brewcraft Premium Belgian Ale Kits
1 x 1.5kg Can Morgans Pale Malt Extract
200g Dextrose
20g Goldings Hops
White Labs WLP500 Trappist Ale Yeast.

Baz.

isuzurover
24th June 2008, 06:16 PM
I've tried the Chimay and a Raseberry beer, not something i'd buy on a regular basis, haven't seen a homebrew recipe for them though.

OK i found this

Belgian Tripel
2 x Brewcraft Premium Belgian Ale Kits
1 x 1.5kg Can Morgans Pale Malt Extract
200g Dextrose
20g Goldings Hops
White Labs WLP500 Trappist Ale Yeast.

Baz.

Thanks Baz - that's awesome! Will have to try it!!!

I don't like the belgian fruit beers - but I do like the others...

EDIT - do you just chuck the hops in the wort??? Or do you need to cook it up then strain?

Oh and Andy - the Saffale blue is saccharomyces ceriviciae - the traditional ale yeast - so I probably will try it.

isuzurover
25th June 2008, 08:05 PM
Well thanks everyone for the tips.

I may be trying to run before I can walk, but I went and got the gear for my 2nd brew this arvo - will be trying a Duvel recipe.

Bought everything from the place on welshpool rd. I will be trying Safale pink.

Chilly
9th August 2008, 12:39 PM
Hi,

Well sort of forgot about my homebrew. It has been sitting in the fermentor for some...going to guess here...couple of months.

Questions are

1 Can I drink it straight from the fermentor?
2 If not can I still bottle it?

Advice greatly received.

Chilly

LandyAndy
9th August 2008, 01:17 PM
Being winter it should be OK still.You can drink it as is but it will be flat.It needs the second fermentation in the bottle to carbonate,or to be kegged and the Co2 added via gas bottle as a few of us do.
Andrew

duncanw
9th August 2008, 10:18 PM
I would say it's going to taste like dog food. There's a reason why you seperate the yeast and the beer when it's finished its business :eek:

I left one in the barrel for two weeks and it tasted like sweaty feet, still drank it all though :D

Ben, whats the latest on the homebrew front ? been experimenting ?

Pedro_The_Swift
10th August 2008, 06:23 AM
Well thanks everyone for the tips.

I may be trying to run before I can walk, but I went and got the gear for my 2nd brew this arvo - will be trying a Duvel recipe.

Bought everything from the place on welshpool rd. I will be trying Safale pink.


"trip' report please!
:D

Stepho_62
10th August 2008, 06:35 AM
Come on Ben

I've brewed and bottled nearly 88 lites whiles you have been frigging round with you first one. :D

Redback
10th August 2008, 07:33 AM
I would say it's going to taste like dog food. There's a reason why you seperate the yeast and the beer when it's finished its business :eek:

I left one in the barrel for two weeks and it tasted like sweaty feet, still drank it all though :D

Ben, whats the latest on the homebrew front ? been experimenting ?

That would be VB then;)

Pedro_The_Swift
10th August 2008, 07:43 AM
That would be VB then;)
:Rolling::Rolling::clap2:

loanrangie
10th August 2008, 04:21 PM
:Rolling::Rolling::clap2:

You can laugh, you guys have to drink that 4X draino :p.

Pedro_The_Swift
10th August 2008, 04:25 PM
mmmmmmm- draino.:cool:
:beer:

duncanw
10th August 2008, 06:43 PM
That would be VB then;)

No this didn't take paint off if you spilled some

ramblingboy42
10th August 2008, 07:55 PM
yeah, beer, I think everyones added some great hints here...some info for beer connoiseurs......the original VB was brewed at the Buffaloe Brewery via Wangaratta Vic, until Carlton took or bought the recipe......but its nothing llike its original taste,,,it was originally an ale,,,,,but anyway if you go to the brewery for afternoon tea on any sat or sunday you may get to taste what may be the original VB.....under a different name.....or perhaps any one of the delicious brews they make there. They only brew in short half hogs heads (a brewing term for qty) so you may be drinking something you enjoy and they run out and you have to have something completely different.....its a great spot to visit for a drink if you live in Victoria or southern NSW. and yeah, you can get VB there.

Redback
11th August 2008, 08:22 AM
yeah, beer, I think everyones added some great hints here...some info for beer connoiseurs......the original VB was brewed at the Buffaloe Brewery via Wangaratta Vic, until Carlton took or bought the recipe......but its nothing llike its original taste,,,it was originally an ale,,,,,but anyway if you go to the brewery for afternoon tea on any sat or sunday you may get to taste what may be the original VB.....under a different name.....or perhaps any one of the delicious brews they make there. They only brew in short half hogs heads (a brewing term for qty) so you may be drinking something you enjoy and they run out and you have to have something completely different.....its a great spot to visit for a drink if you live in Victoria or southern NSW. and yeah, you can get VB there.

Didn't Calton release a short run of the original recipe VB Ale a while ago.

There has a lot of the original ales dropped by brewerys, Hunter Old, Flag Ale, DA (Dinner Ale), just too name 3.

isuzurover
11th August 2008, 11:14 AM
Come on Ben

I've brewed and bottled nearly 88 lites whiles you have been frigging round with you first one. :D

??? Maybe not as quick as you, but I have brewed and bottled 46L since I first started this thread.

For anyone interested - the first brew (coopers lager) tasted great - very crisp with a slightly fruity aftertaste (NFI where that came from). Very drinkable.

The 2nd (fancy) brew took 4 WEEKS!!! in the fermenter before it got down to a stable FG. It has been bottled for 2 weeks, and is tasting GREAT, but I am hoping it will still improve over the next few weeks (if it lasts that long). The strainer I used for the hop mixture wasn't as fine as it could be, so I had some hop seeds in the fermenter, which meant the brew has quite a strong hop flavour, but not unpleasant. Overall very happy with the result! Doesn't taste much like Duvel, but it is a VERY drinkable, belgian style beer - about 6.5% alcohol (not quite the 8.5% I was aiming for...)

I will definitely be using the safale pink again. Gave a compact sediment (like in the bottom of a coopers stubbie), but the beer still has a cloudy look like commercial unfiltered beer. Andy's brew using the yellow Safale on the other hand, was crystal clear.

Will be starting another brew tonight! Washing bottles is a PITA - might switch to a keg system soon...

Redback
11th August 2008, 01:42 PM
??? Maybe not as quick as you, but I have brewed and bottled 46L since I first started this thread.

For anyone interested - the first brew (coopers lager) tasted great - very crisp with a slightly fruity aftertaste (NFI where that came from). Very drinkable.

The 2nd (fancy) brew took 4 WEEKS!!! in the fermenter before it got down to a stable FG. It has been bottled for 2 weeks, and is tasting GREAT, but I am hoping it will still improve over the next few weeks (if it lasts that long). The strainer I used for the hop mixture wasn't as fine as it could be, so I had some hop seeds in the fermenter, which meant the brew has quite a strong hop flavour, but not unpleasant. Overall very happy with the result! Doesn't taste much like Duvel, but it is a VERY drinkable, belgian style beer - about 6.5% alcohol (not quite the 8.5% I was aiming for...)

I will definitely be using the safale pink again. Gave a compact sediment (like in the bottom of a coopers stubbie), but the beer still has a cloudy look like commercial unfiltered beer. Andy's brew using the yellow Safale on the other hand, was crystal clear.

Will be starting another brew tonight! Washing bottles is a PITA - might switch to a keg system soon...

4 weeks, good grief Ben, i wouldn't worry so much about the gravity, if it's close after 10 days, transfer it too another fermenter and clear it that way, don't forget to put 3 teaspoons of suger (use normal suger) and give it a stir, let it sit for about 2 or 3 days or when it looks clear, this will also bring the gravity/FG to where you want it, then bottle it.

The sugar stops it going off if left for long periods, the stir help it settle more and blends the sugar in too, this just helps with a clearer brew.

It's the cold weather that slows the fermenting down.

Baz.

martinozcmax
11th August 2008, 01:55 PM
Co-incidentally I barrelled my first batch of home brew on Sunday for about 6 years. Now I have to clean out all the 750ml bottles.

I reckon the bagged glucose tablets will still be ok to use after that long, sugar doesn't go off does it ?

Regards


Martin

Bigbjorn
11th August 2008, 02:04 PM
There has a lot of the original ales dropped by brewerys, Hunter Old, Flag Ale, DA (Dinner Ale), just too name 3.

I reckoned Toohey's Hunter Old was the best commercial beer in Australia. Made only at Toohey's Broadmeadow brewery in Newcastle and only sold in the Hunter district. You could get it at Singleton but not at Muswellbrook. I used to buy a dozen every time I used the Putty road. Didn't know they had stopped making it. I suppose the Broadmeadow brewery has been closed? In most of the pubs and clubs in the Hunter in those days, if you asked for a beer you got served a schooner of Toohey's Hunter Old. Smaller serves and other beers were for wimps and invalids. Most of the women drank schooners of Old.

Pedro_The_Swift
11th August 2008, 02:41 PM
they stopped making it a LOOOONG time ago,,Tooheys closed the brewery and made it in Sydney for a while,, not a bad drop, but NOTHING like the original,,
I remember being at Bondys brewery at the Americas cup, and they brewed normal tooheys old there,, and drove it over to the east,,,

agrojnr
11th August 2008, 02:49 PM
??? Maybe not as quick as you, but I have brewed and bottled 46L since I first started this thread.

For anyone interested - the first brew (coopers lager) tasted great - very crisp with a slightly fruity aftertaste (NFI where that came from). Very drinkable.

The 2nd (fancy) brew took 4 WEEKS!!! in the fermenter before it got down to a stable FG. It has been bottled for 2 weeks, and is tasting GREAT, but I am hoping it will still improve over the next few weeks (if it lasts that long). The strainer I used for the hop mixture wasn't as fine as it could be, so I had some hop seeds in the fermenter, which meant the brew has quite a strong hop flavour, but not unpleasant. Overall very happy with the result! Doesn't taste much like Duvel, but it is a VERY drinkable, belgian style beer - about 6.5% alcohol (not quite the 8.5% I was aiming for...)

I will definitely be using the safale pink again. Gave a compact sediment (like in the bottom of a coopers stubbie), but the beer still has a cloudy look like commercial unfiltered beer. Andy's brew using the yellow Safale on the other hand, was crystal clear.

Will be starting another brew tonight! Washing bottles is a PITA - might switch to a keg system soon...


Bugger the bottles why don't you get yourself a keg setup:D

You can come have a look at mine anytime


Adam

isuzurover
11th August 2008, 05:24 PM
4 weeks, good grief Ben, i wouldn't worry so much about the gravity, if it's close after 10 days, transfer it too another fermenter and clear it that way, don't forget to put 3 teaspoons of suger (use normal suger) and give it a stir, let it sit for about 2 or 3 days or when it looks clear, this will also bring the gravity/FG to where you want it, then bottle it.

The sugar stops it going off if left for long periods, the stir help it settle more and blends the sugar in too, this just helps with a clearer brew.

It's the cold weather that slows the fermenting down.

Baz.

I could probably have bottled it 1-2 weeks earlier, but it seemed happy ticking along at 14 deg.

The SG started at 56, after a week was about 40 / 28 / 18 / 12 (week 1-4)

Tried a bottle after 1 week, tasted terrible. But after 2 weeks it is better than most of our favourite commercial beers (had one on the weekend then had a coopers afterwards - the coopers tasted like crap in comparison).

Thanks for the tips - will try that next time.



Bugger the bottles why don't you get yourself a keg setup:D

You can come have a look at mine anytime


Adam

A keg setup is definitely on the cards! would love to have a look at your setup. You are welcome to drop in any time and see what you think of my latest batch!

LandyAndy
11th August 2008, 07:30 PM
Hi Martin
I wouldnt use them "lollies",easy yes,I found them way too slow on the secondary fermentation.
It is possible to "bulk prime",I used to do it.Disolve the correct amount of sugar for the number of bottles in a cup of hot water,tip it into fermenter when you start washing the bottles then bottle as per usual.
Go the kegs,you will love it.MUCH better beer quality!!!!
Ben
Its the Blue Saffale yeast I use.You already know,but for others I also use the supplied yeast included with the brew tin.
Andrew

Redback
11th August 2008, 08:01 PM
I reckoned Toohey's Hunter Old was the best commercial beer in Australia. Made only at Toohey's Broadmeadow brewery in Newcastle and only sold in the Hunter district. You could get it at Singleton but not at Muswellbrook. I used to buy a dozen every time I used the Putty road. Didn't know they had stopped making it. I suppose the Broadmeadow brewery has been closed? In most of the pubs and clubs in the Hunter in those days, if you asked for a beer you got served a schooner of Toohey's Hunter Old. Smaller serves and other beers were for wimps and invalids. Most of the women drank schooners of Old.

My favourite drop was Hunter Old, and one of the best places to have an Old was the Hunter hotel in Hunter St:D but other pubs got my money too, like the Blue Peter, Star, Clarendon, Canterbury, and the Northern Star in Hamilton, the Gunyah in Belmont, and later the Morson at Caves Beach, of coarse most Pubs in those days were exclusive too breweries, you'll notice most of the pubs I mentioned were Tooths or Reschs pubs, Tooths Old (or Brown as it was known)and Reschs being my other choice of beer.

Baz.

chook
11th August 2008, 08:03 PM
I agree with the comments about using kegs, tried bottles a long time ago almost turned me off the whole idea, now use 18 litre post mix kegs and so much easier, just sorted some 50 litre kegs and also going to give that a try. I did however have a problem with taking the brew camping until I made myself a temp rite so now when I head off for a boys trip away I travel with 2 kegs the temp rite some ice and maybe a little food. Good luck with it and try different ideas, regardless of the taste you'll drink it anyway.

Bigbjorn
11th August 2008, 08:15 PM
Tooths Old (or Brown as it was known)and Reschs being my other choice of beer.

Baz.

The Resch's brewery was the Waverley Brewery in South Dowling Street. Resch's was long owned by Tooth's. The true Resch's draught beer, Waverley Bitter, made at the Waverley was only sold in central and inner Sydney. The draught Resch's sold by a majority of pubs in NSW was actually Kent Bitter made at Tooth's Kent Brewery in Broadway. The two brews were noticeably different with the Waverley brew getting my vote.

isuzurover
11th August 2008, 10:38 PM
Ben
Its the Blue Saffale yeast I use.You already know,but for others I also use the supplied yeast included with the brew tin.
Andrew

Ahh - that's right. Yellow is SafLager...

I am going to try your trick of using a (saf)ale yeast and a lager yeast together this time Andy.

Redback
12th August 2008, 07:18 AM
The Resch's brewery was the Waverley Brewery in South Dowling Street. Resch's was long owned by Tooth's. The true Resch's draught beer, Waverley Bitter, made at the Waverley was only sold in central and inner Sydney. The draught Resch's sold by a majority of pubs in NSW was actually Kent Bitter made at Tooth's Kent Brewery in Broadway. The two brews were noticeably different with the Waverley brew getting my vote.

I think the Reschs Real is supposed to be the re-introduction of the Waverley Bitter, but not having had a taste of the original or Reschs Real, i can't say.

Baz.

D3Jon
12th August 2008, 11:14 AM
<snip> You already know,but for others I also use the supplied yeast included with the brew tin.
Andrew

HI Andy,

Do you use both packets of yeast then? I'm just about to knock up a fresh batch of 'falling down juice', I always use Safale S04 and throw away the included yeast.

Also, a quick question for you guys using kegs... Does the final product have slightly less alcohol in it, because you don't get the secondary fermentation you would get if using bottles?

Here's a keg system I keep seeing on Ebay (far cheaper than buying here in WA from Westbrew or similar who want $400 for a keg system which comes with one new keg), have you guys any thoughts on this set up (it looks to me like it doesn't have enough fittings to put CO2 into both kegs at the same time??)

Ebay Keg System (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Home-Brew-KEGGING-SETUP-Kegs-Tap-Gun-Regulator-TheLot_W0QQitemZ270263147123QQihZ017QQcategoryZ571 QQcmdZViewItem)

Thanks,

Jon

isuzurover
12th August 2008, 12:51 PM
HI Andy,

Do you use both packets of yeast then? I'm just about to knock up a fresh batch of 'falling down juice', I always use Safale S04 and throw away the included yeast.

Also, a quick question for you guys using kegs... Does the final product have slightly less alcohol in it, because you don't get the secondary fermentation you would get if using bottles?

Here's a keg system I keep seeing on Ebay (far cheaper than buying here in WA from Westbrew or similar who want $400 for a keg system which comes with one new keg), have you guys any thoughts on this set up (it looks to me like it doesn't have enough fittings to put CO2 into both kegs at the same time??)

Ebay Keg System (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Home-Brew-KEGGING-SETUP-Kegs-Tap-Gun-Regulator-TheLot_W0QQitemZ270263147123QQihZ017QQcategoryZ571 QQcmdZViewItem)

Thanks,

Jon

That's what Andy told me. He said the beer he gave me when I was there was (coopers?)lager, and he had thrown in the Safale (04) and the lager yeast. Never heard of anyone doing it before, but the beer was bloody good, so I am going to give it a try.

I found something on the fermentis/s.i. lesaffre website that said to use double the quantity of yeast when fermentating at low temperatures.

Thanks for the link - that keg system looks good!

agrojnr
12th August 2008, 06:04 PM
This is where I got my keg system from

Gryphon Brewing (http://www.gryphonbrewing.com.au/store/index.php)

And this is where I get my kits etc from

BrewMart (http://www.brewmart.com.au/index.php?crypt_key=PzyQC8gAUOH8nDW1vwkBNn3eX)

Brewmart are just around the corner from me at work:D

Also Ben I have just finished my wheat beer and should be drinkable by the weekend:cool:


Adam

LandyAndy
12th August 2008, 08:18 PM
Hi Jon
Yep I throw the supplied yeast plus Saffale(blue pack) yeast,have done for 5 years,always a good result.
On the kegs,you only need to get an extra gas fitting and a T peice for the gas line.
Once you are set up look into getting 2 more kegs,adds quality to the beer.I run 4 kegs,at the moment.2 in the fridge on the gas,only one getting drawn upon,empty 1 swap to the new one add another to the fridge.2 kegs in insulated cupboard ageing.
I also brew 2 brews at once in seperate fermenters,leaving them slightly longer than normal in the fermenter,3 to 4 weeks depending on time available or empty kegs.
The trick to good carbonation is at least 4 days @ 4degC or lower,the beer wont accept Co2 above 4degC.
Andrew

martinozcmax
13th August 2008, 05:35 AM
Hi Martin
I wouldnt use them "lollies",easy yes,I found them way too slow on the secondary fermentation.
It is possible to "bulk prime",I used to do it.Disolve the correct amount of sugar for the number of bottles in a cup of hot water,tip it into fermenter when you start washing the bottles then bottle as per usual.
Go the kegs,you will love it.MUCH better beer quality!!!!
Ben
Its the Blue Saffale yeast I use.You already know,but for others I also use the supplied yeast included with the brew tin.
Andrew

I am seriously tempted to go the keg. Filling and cleaning nottles is a major PITA. Are there any issues to worry about when using kegs versus bottling ? How long does a CO2 bottle last. Is it easy to fill, seal etc ?

Thanks Andy

Martin

agrojnr
13th August 2008, 07:51 AM
Kegging is easy as long as you follow the same ways as the bottles.

Clean clean clean:D

When I empty a keg I fill with water and abit of co2 run through the tap for a bit and then tip the rest onto the lawn, but if your next keg is the same beer then you don't have to run it through the line.

Also when you have an empty keg put abit od co2 in and it keeps an air tight seal so no nasties can get in.

I run a full size co2 bottle which sould last around 12 months but you can get the smaller ones from your brew shop with should last between 2-4 months.


Hey Andy what do you run your co2 pressure at??? and have you tried forced carbonation???


Adam

agrojnr
13th August 2008, 05:57 PM
Here is my set up
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/08/766.jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/08/767.jpg

https://www.aulro.com/afvb/images/imported/2008/08/768.jpg

Total cost including fridge was around the 450 mark.

Its worth the effort to go down this route because once the 3rd keg is empty I will basicly be paying around $15 per carton:eek:

Can't wait till I get the 2nd fermenter and start on Guinness:cool:


Also I will turn my old bar fridge into a fermenting fridge:D

Adam

martinozcmax
13th August 2008, 06:28 PM
I have learnt heaps from the posts thanks. I'm an old brewer from 30+ years ago and the idea of moving the beer when brewed to another barrel with 3 tablespoons of sugar to decant and remove the lees(?) appeals. I also want to barrel it and save the crappola around washing and filling bottles.

As I am time poor, I wondered are these any good Andy and guys ?

NEW KEGERATOR BEER KEG FRIDGE bar home brewing system - eBay Bar Fridges, Refrigerators, Freezers, Appliances, Home. (end time 13-Aug-08 21:00:00 AEST) (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=230280018983&ssPageName=ADME:B:WNA:AU:1123)

Thanks


Regards


Martin

agrojnr
13th August 2008, 07:17 PM
They are good buuuuuttttt, its the same as what I have done.

All they are is a fridge with a tap on top.

My fridge (430L) cost me $99 from a sencond had joint and the tap was $50 so I am still 350 bucks in front of that thing.

Tonight it took me 5min to move my brew from the fermenter to the keg so if your time poor then just keg then after a week of co2 start drinking:)


Adam

martinozcmax
13th August 2008, 07:19 PM
They are good buuuuuttttt, its the same as what I have done.

All they are is a fridge with a tap on top.

My fridge (430L) cost me $99 from a sencond had joint and the tap was $50 so I am still 350 bucks in front of that thing.

Tonight it took me 5min to move my brew from the fermenter to the keg so if your time poor then just keg then after a week of co2 start drinking:)


Adam

Thanks, why the week on CO2. Doesn't it gas it up straight away ?

agrojnr
13th August 2008, 07:43 PM
If you gas at poring pressure (110kpa) it will take about 5 days for the co2 too get into the beer (2nd fermantation) or you can try forced carbonation which takes about a day and a half


Still quicker that 6 weeks or so in bottles


Adam

Redback
14th August 2008, 08:37 AM
On Sunday i put down 2 more beers, both from ESB (Eastern Suburbs Brewery)
a Nut Brown Ale
http://www.esbeer.com.au/images/nutbrownlabel%20small.jpg
Nut Brown Ale Pack 3kg (http://www.esbeer.com.au/prod179.htm)
Dark Amber Coloured ale, in the style of a Newcastle Brown Ale. Recommended White Labs Yeast:Burton Ale WLP023. We also recommend using the Amber Grain enhancer for extra flavour and body.

AND

A Stout 15lts of fresh wort
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/
Stout Fresh Wort Kit (including Saf yeast) (http://www.esbeer.com.au/prod190.htm)

For a full bodied Stout Add NO water. A classic Stout in the Guinness tradition. Nice roast flavours and aromatics. Tight creamy head. Incorporates the unmalted Torrified Wheat to enhance that creamy stout head. Comes with DCL Safale yeast. Will work best with White Labs WLP004 Irish Ale Liquid Yeast.

Ben this is for you.
http://www.esbeer.com.au/images/belg_ale_label%20small.jpg
Belgian Smoked Ale Pack 3kg (http://www.esbeer.com.au/prod180.htm)
The perfect beer for a BBQ, with the added fragrance of the campfire. Recommended White Labs Yeast:Belgian Ale WLP550. We also recommend using the Amber Grain enhancer for extra flavour and body.

AND

http://www.esbeer.com.au/images/belgian%20golden%20ale%202%203kg_sml.jpg
Belgian Golden Ale Pack 3kg (http://www.esbeer.com.au/prod21.htm)
A Belgian style golden ale, with a distintive Begian finish, rounded out by a touch of Saaz.

You can get these and the fresh wort kits from ESB or brew shops that stock them, i think Brewcraft in WA stock them.




My set up
https://www.aulro.com/afvb/
Party keg, uses a soda stream gas bottle for pouring
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/bazzar/thekeg004.jpg
Bar fridge under the bar
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/bazzar/thekeg006.jpg

Baz.

isuzurover
14th August 2008, 01:41 PM
If you gas at poring pressure (110kpa) it will take about 5 days for the co2 too get into the beer (2nd fermantation) or you can try forced carbonation which takes about a day and a half


Still quicker that 6 weeks or so in bottles


Adam

Care to elaborate on "forced carbonation" ?

Do you put any sugar in the keg? Or do anything other than pour the beer from the (1st?) fermenter into the keg?


Bl**dy hell Baz that is a serious setup!!!

Redback
14th August 2008, 02:32 PM
Care to elaborate on "forced carbonation" ?

Do you put any sugar in the keg? Or do anything other than pour the beer from the (1st?) fermenter into the keg?


Bl**dy hell Baz that is a serious setup!!!

I had time and a bit of money too spend at the time:D

Have a look at this Ben it has carbonating in there, forced carbonating is the way most carbonate their beer,
Keg Bible (http://whatsbrewing.com.au/pages/kegbible.html)

I normally put my kegs in the fridge and let them get cold (24hrs) before i carbonate them.

Baz.

LandyAndy
14th August 2008, 09:05 PM
Hi Adam
Its quicker than 6 days,mines drinkable after 2 on the gas,much better by 4.Better still the longer it goes.
4degC is the magic figure,if your fridge is cold it works quicker.The Co2 doesnt infuse into the beer until then.
Unsure the psi,once set I leave it,pretty sure mine is a mig welder type,10lt min is too slow 15lt min too fast.
You dont need to be as clean with kegs Adam,they are sealed.I leave them with the dregs in when empty,still have Co2 at pouring pressure.I simply rinse with hot water then rinse with a couple of litres of boiling water,ready to fill.Nothing survives with Co2 and the boiling water steralises.The fermenting stage cleanliness is just as important as normal brewing.NEVER had a dodgy keg brew.
Martin
I would just convert a good fridge(has to get cold).
Im not into them pub style beer taps.I have a beer gun,or Poluto as their known.My setup is in my shed,dust,flies,grinding dust,spraypaint etc etc etc.Gun lives in the fridge where it stays clean.
Andrew

martinozcmax
16th August 2008, 07:07 AM
Hi Adam
Its quicker than 6 days,mines drinkable after 2 on the gas,much better by 4.Better still the longer it goes.
4degC is the magic figure,if your fridge is cold it works quicker.The Co2 doesnt infuse into the beer until then.
Unsure the psi,once set I leave it,pretty sure mine is a mig welder type,10lt min is too slow 15lt min too fast.
You dont need to be as clean with kegs Adam,they are sealed.I leave them with the dregs in when empty,still have Co2 at pouring pressure.I simply rinse with hot water then rinse with a couple of litres of boiling water,ready to fill.Nothing survives with Co2 and the boiling water steralises.The fermenting stage cleanliness is just as important as normal brewing.NEVER had a dodgy keg brew.
Martin
I would just convert a good fridge(has to get cold).
Im not into them pub style beer taps.I have a beer gun,or Poluto as their known.My setup is in my shed,dust,flies,grinding dust,spraypaint etc etc etc.Gun lives in the fridge where it stays clean.
Andrew

Thanks Andy, I have found a source and am buying a couple of kegs and all the associated kit. I also bought two more 30 litre fermentation bins to allow me to have 2 brews going and one to decant and add the finings as that sounds like a good idea.

While I was in the home brew shop I also was attracted to the still section and after tasting home brew whisky I am now seriously considering a still setup. Purely for distilled water and essential oils of course. :D

LandyAndy
17th August 2008, 01:40 PM
A guy in town has one of those still kits.
Have tried his scotch and burbouns,no match for the aged real product.However his other stuff,black sambucca,white sambucca,vodka etc are VERY GOOD.
Start saving for a liver transplant when you get a still:p:p:p:p
Andrew

isuzurover
20th August 2008, 05:26 PM
In case anyone is interested, the brew I am currently making is:

1 can of Cascade Porter
1 can of Coopers Real Ale
0.5kg Dextrose
coopers yeast
cascade bohemian yeast

(I like dark beers but the wife isn't fussed, so hopefully this will turn out as an "intermediate" beer).

Will let everyone know how it turns out...

LandyAndy
20th August 2008, 07:28 PM
Hi Ben
The Real ale is fairly dark as too is the Porter.Deb loves the Porter,its dark but not alot heavier than a normal beer.Next keg to open is a Cascade Porter,with Diatose and Dry beer enzyme,been in the fridge for 3 weeks and the cupboard for a week so should be a nice drop.
Impressed the hell out of a "I dont drink homebrew" workmate last fri nite.Not only had him blowing bubbles but is still saying it was one of the nicest beers he had ever drank.Coopers European Lager with the diatose and dry enzyme.Its my favorite brew at the moment!!!!
For those who dont know,Diatose and the Dry Enzyme give you a full strength lower carb brew.I use it on all my brews,gives a much less sweeter beer with greatly reduced bloat some homebrews produce.
Andrew

isuzurover
20th August 2008, 08:40 PM
Hi Ben
The Real ale is fairly dark as too is the Porter.Deb loves the Porter,its dark but not alot heavier than a normal beer.Next keg to open is a Cascade Porter,with Diatose and Dry beer enzyme,been in the fridge for 3 weeks and the cupboard for a week so should be a nice drop.
Impressed the hell out of a "I dont drink homebrew" workmate last fri nite.Not only had him blowing bubbles but is still saying it was one of the nicest beers he had ever drank.Coopers European Lager with the diatose and dry enzyme.Its my favorite brew at the moment!!!!
For those who dont know,Diatose and the Dry Enzyme give you a full strength lower carb brew.I use it on all my brews,gives a much less sweeter beer with greatly reduced bloat some homebrews produce.
Andrew

Thanks Andy - I noticed that the real ale was quite dark too. It is the smoky/burnt flavour of old/dark beers that Bec doesn't like. But she did drink Porter in Germany. She has already said that we have to make the "Duvel" (belgian style) beer again soon.

Redback
20th August 2008, 08:49 PM
That will turn out too be a good tasting beer for you, i think to please a non ale drinking person a mix of ale and Lager or draught would be better, try Blackrocks from New Zealand for sweet tasting beers, the Kiwis make very good Homebrew kits and Blackrock is one of the best.

This would be a good one too try, you could add a real ale style to this or try it by itself.

DIDGERIDOOHER DRAUGHT
1 can Blackrock Colonial Lager
600g Honey
400g light malt
50g crystal grain
16g Saaz Hops

Baz.

agrojnr
20th August 2008, 09:42 PM
Hi Ben
The Real ale is fairly dark as too is the Porter.Deb loves the Porter,its dark but not alot heavier than a normal beer.Next keg to open is a Cascade Porter,with Diatose and Dry beer enzyme,been in the fridge for 3 weeks and the cupboard for a week so should be a nice drop.
Impressed the hell out of a "I dont drink homebrew" workmate last fri nite.Not only had him blowing bubbles but is still saying it was one of the nicest beers he had ever drank.Coopers European Lager with the diatose and dry enzyme.Its my favorite brew at the moment!!!!
For those who dont know,Diatose and the Dry Enzyme give you a full strength lower carb brew.I use it on all my brews,gives a much less sweeter beer with greatly reduced bloat some homebrews produce.
Andrew


Andy what do you put in the porter??? I love the stuff and would rather drink that than the Guinness:eek:


We should have a home brew night:D


Adam

isuzurover
20th August 2008, 11:36 PM
That will turn out too be a good tasting beer for you, i think to please a non ale drinking person a mix of ale and Lager or draught would be better, try Blackrocks from New Zealand for sweet tasting beers, the Kiwis make very good Homebrew kits and Blackrock is one of the best.

This would be a good one too try, you could add a real ale style to this or try it by itself.

DIDGERIDOOHER DRAUGHT
1 can Blackrock Colonial Lager
600g Honey
400g light malt
50g crystal grain
16g Saaz Hops

Baz.

Thanks Baz - however we both much prefer Ales. Just that Bec prefers pale/IPA/Belgian style ales, rather than dark ales, and I like both.

Adam - a homebrew night sounds like a great idea! You flying over with a couple of kegs Baz???

Cheers!

Ben.

martinozcmax
4th September 2008, 01:45 PM
Thanks Andy, I have found a source and am buying a couple of kegs and all the associated kit. I also bought two more 30 litre fermentation bins to allow me to have 2 brews going and one to decant and add the finings as that sounds like a good idea.

While I was in the home brew shop I also was attracted to the still section and after tasting home brew whisky I am now seriously considering a still setup. Purely for distilled water and essential oils of course. :D

Update
I now have two full kegs one with stout using two stout home brew kit cans as someone suggested. Top drop. I had a little left over and bottled them. Also a belgian lager which after brewing I decanted to another fermenting bin and put finings in it. Came out nice and clear. I have got all the kit now except a fridge that fits these two cylinders, (Missus has found us one on fleabay picking it up on Saturday) and a CO2 cyclinder which with a bit of luck I'm about to get. :twisted:

I have a replacement batch fermenting away so I'm going to be a very happy chappy in a week or so.

I have a couple of spirit brews fermenting away quite happily. It's starts off as basically water with ten kilos of sugar and some super fast fermenting high alcohol tolerance yeast. This stuff I bought is supposedly capable of brewing the sugar into alcohol at around 12 per cent proof in 6 days. However I have had it going (with a temperature belt so I know the temp is ok) for two weeks now and it's still bubbling away merrily. No rush I'll just leave it till it stops.

Then once I have distilled it I have mixers for Sambucca white and black, ouzo, Vodka, a whisky kit that supposedly lets you replicate different bought whisky's. Also a Tia Maria and Baileys kit for swmbo as well as the widows ruin Gin.

One general question for you, why is there a Vodka mixer when Vodka isn't supposed to taste of anything ? And why did I buy it in that case !

:D :D :D

Regards

Martin

ryaninhilltop
4th September 2008, 07:35 PM
If you are new to brewing stick to coopers very hard to go wrong when starting out. IT's quite easy to the replace sugar, it's just a matter of taste.
Sorry if makes no sense, having a couple of home brews.
Cheers Mick

agrojnr
5th September 2008, 10:24 AM
Will have a stella ready in a week or so:D

I have had alot of problems lately with my keg fridge but looks like I sorted all that out

Next is a double brew fridge ( if I get time to get it ) and then start on the redback and guinness brews:cool:

Adam

isuzurover
19th June 2009, 04:03 PM
We just started what will hopefully be a Belgian triple. Aiming for around 9% alcohol - should be good for a winter warmer!!! ;) :D

We got hold of some champagne yeast from a friend, some belgian candi sugar from the brew shop, and we tried to make some ourselves as well, but stopped when we had invert sugar syrup and threw it in like that:
Making your own Belgian Candi Sugar or Syrup (http://www.franklinbrew.org/brewinfo/candi_sugar.html)

Somewhat experimental, but we will see what it ends up like...

I saw that our local brewshop has a keg kit on special for $399
2x used 19L kegs
Beer gun
lines/connectors, etc...

They sell CO2 cylinders for $270 outright.

But it looks like I can get better prices on Ebay...

I also measured up our bar fridge, and I would have to remove the freezer section to fit even 1 keg in - if that is even possible...

LandyAndy
19th June 2009, 07:07 PM
Hey Ben
My Milko mate keeps promising to get me one of those flavoured milk fridges you see in roadhouses for my homebrew.
If he ever comes good on the offer you are welcome to my keg fridge.Its in top working order!!!
Andrew

Wil2k
1st March 2010, 12:47 PM
Just got a Coopers micro brew kit from my girl! Have the first batch fermenting right now! Looking forward to it a lot!!

1st brew is the Coopers Lager that came with the kit (how convenient are these concentrates!!) then we're doing a Coopers ginger beer (non alc) for the family.

I'd love to experiment with some of the bavarian style beers. Any suggestions?

In brisbane it's hot.. my wort was sitting at 32 degrees when I added the yeast, (pretty much the max temp limit they specify, but recommend max 27 degrees). it's a coller day now annd the wort is sitting at 30ish degrees. Has anyone got any comments on temperature and brewing in QLD?

Cheers (literally)

Wil

numpty
1st March 2010, 01:20 PM
I find in Qld, that it's better to brew during the cooler months, as it's easier to warm the wort, than it is to keep it cool. The last brew I did was the Coopers Mexican and it is a good drop, although a mate in Sydney has gone ape over the Canadian Blonde.

I'm not brewing much these days, as I went off beer for a month:eek: and the taste for it hasn't come back as well as it should.:mad:

LandyAndy
1st March 2010, 03:02 PM
Wil
Welcome to the joy of brewing your own.
As Numpty says,the hot weather isnt as good for brewing.A quickly brewed beer isnt as good as a slow brewed beer.
2 ways to cool your fermenter.
Get a large tray to sit the fermenter in,fill with water and use a towel to create a coolgardie safe.Makesure you sterilise the tap after this before bottleing just in case.
Convert an old fridge to run at 22deg.You can buy a thermostat that plugs into the wall,the fridge plugs into this.A temp probe goes in the fridge.Power is regulated to the fridge to keep the temp you select on the thermostat.
Dark beers(stouts etc) seem to be effected most quality wise with the heat,I dont have too much trouble with Coopers Canadian Blonde and Mexican Ceveza during summer.I dont use and cooling.
Andrew

isuzurover
2nd March 2010, 10:05 PM
A mate who brews excellent beer (he even grinds his own malt), uses a fridge to ferment his beer. He has a seperate temperature controller to turn the fridge on and off to maintain the right temp.

Redback
3rd March 2010, 06:38 AM
A mate who brews excellent beer (he even grinds his own malt), uses a fridge to ferment his beer. He has a seperate temperature controller to turn the fridge on and off to maintain the right temp.

I've seen some of the brew shops do this in summer.

I'm lucky where I live, we have a 3 level house and the bottom level stays cool in summer, it is constantly around the 22c to 26c all summer.

Baz.

Wil2k
5th March 2010, 11:06 AM
Hmm.. my fermenter has stopped (or slowed to barely at all) bubbling after about 4 days. I did start it at 32 degrees.. so I'm guessing it was churning along a lot faster than normal.

Over the last 3 days I've checked the SG and gotten 1018 and 1014 and then today 1012. as I understand it this brew's FG should sit between about 1010 and 1008 when done. Does it matter that i'm not seeing the bubbler doing anything? (probably coming in at the wrong times hehe) The brew smells good.. simply busting to bottle it.

I need to get the same SG on two consecutive days before it is ready to bottle.. is that right? - I can't bear the thought of wasting (via testing SG) beer unnecessarily! :o

I'm such a newb!

Cheers

Wil

woody
5th March 2010, 04:13 PM
forget get about wether you see bubbles in the airlock or not test the sg over 2 days and when its the same it is ok to bottle.

don't stress too much it's better to let it go a couple a days longer than bottle too early, especially if using glass bottles

agrojnr
5th March 2010, 08:31 PM
Really depends on what your making but woody is right if the reading is the same over 2 days then bottle.

If your making a larger or bitter (something light) the a lower sg rate is better but if your making a stout or dark ale the slightly higher is better.

I have found that when making a wheat beer that if I use rain water it turns out better it does take a little longer

As for fridge ferminters I can take some pics of my set up if ya want

Adam

isuzurover
5th March 2010, 08:49 PM
The FG (or final SG / FSG) of your brew depends on what you put in. e.g. a belgian heavy ale will have an FG above most lagers.

There are a bunch of calculators you can use to estimate what your FG should be. e.g. australia and new zealand - Brewcraft Ltd (http://www.brewcraft.com.au/wawcs019616/ln-brewers-calculator.html)

The best I have found are from American websites - but you need to convert all ingredients to lb and oz.

LandyAndy
5th March 2010, 09:40 PM
I NEVER take SG readings.
I tend to leave the brews in the fermenter for 3 weeks then keg.
When kegging it isnt as critical,if the brew isnt finished,it will whilst resting in the kegs,I run 4 kegs.2 in the fridge,1 serving the other gassing and mellowing and 2 in an insulated "resting" cupboard.
Depending upon greed and visitors greed my brews are at least 5 weeks old before drinking,plus the extra "in fermenter" ageing.
Once you get your head around brewing,FORGET BOTTLES!!!! Much better quality beer via the keg system,plus it SO MUCH EASIER and QUICKER:cool::cool::cool::cool:
I went for YEARS on bottles,the change over blew me away.Keg homebrew is as good as pub tap beer if not better.
Andrew

D3Jon
12th March 2010, 10:58 AM
I NEVER take SG readings.
I tend to leave the brews in the fermenter for 3 weeks then keg.
When kegging it isnt as critical,if the brew isnt finished,it will whilst resting in the kegs,I run 4 kegs.2 in the fridge,1 serving the other gassing and mellowing and 2 in an insulated "resting" cupboard.
Depending upon greed and visitors greed my brews are at least 5 weeks old before drinking,plus the extra "in fermenter" ageing.
Once you get your head around brewing,FORGET BOTTLES!!!! Much better quality beer via the keg system,plus it SO MUCH EASIER and QUICKER:cool::cool::cool::cool:
I went for YEARS on bottles,the change over blew me away.Keg homebrew is as good as pub tap beer if not better.
Andrew

Couldn't agree more - best thing I ever did was go over to a keg system. No messing with bottles, just clean and sterilise one keg and transfer straight from the fermenter, put on gas in an old fridge and drink it as little as 3 days later! :beer::cool:

Jon

Wil2k
15th March 2010, 08:59 PM
Kegs sound like the way to go then!! :)

and now.. dumb question.. while I am still using bottles.. Is there a benefit to using the darker glass / PET bottles as opposed to clear? I have a lot of mexican style stubbies hanging around that I had been keeping in case they were usable.

Cheers

Wil

Bigbjorn
15th March 2010, 10:21 PM
Kegs sound like the way to go then!! :)

and now.. dumb question.. while I am still using bottles.. Is there a benefit to using the darker glass / PET bottles as opposed to clear? I have a lot of mexican style stubbies hanging around that I had been keeping in case they were usable.

Cheers

Wil

I have been hoarding Schwelmer Pils and Grolsch swing top bottles for years. Far easier than crown seals.

Redback
16th March 2010, 10:05 AM
I NEVER take SG readings.
I tend to leave the brews in the fermenter for 3 weeks then keg.
When kegging it isnt as critical,if the brew isnt finished,it will whilst resting in the kegs,I run 4 kegs.2 in the fridge,1 serving the other gassing and mellowing and 2 in an insulated "resting" cupboard.
Depending upon greed and visitors greed my brews are at least 5 weeks old before drinking,plus the extra "in fermenter" ageing.
Once you get your head around brewing,FORGET BOTTLES!!!! Much better quality beer via the keg system,plus it SO MUCH EASIER and QUICKER:cool::cool::cool::cool:
I went for YEARS on bottles,the change over blew me away.Keg homebrew is as good as pub tap beer if not better.
Andrew

Pretty much what I do and I have the same amount of Kegs.

I have never taken a reading of any kind with my brews.

As I don't bottle either, I clear my brews by Lagering them (that's a fancy word for transfering the fermented brew into another fermenter, then add 3 teaspoons of sugar stir and let it rest for 2 to 3 days, then transfer into the keg.

Kegs are the go, the beer taste better, it's clear, there's no yeast smell or taste (ie homebrew flavour) and it's quicker from start to finish, I'd go as far as to say it taste better than beer on tap at the pub:D

Baz.