Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: After market turbo on 1993 Toyota hilux

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Sussex Inlet. N.S.W.
    Posts
    6,638
    Total Downloaded
    0

    After market turbo on 1993 Toyota hilux

    I have one of these vehicles for work. 308,000k on the clock and still running well. My question is about turbo operation. I know that exhaust gasses spin the turbo to generate boost on the air intake (2l.8l diesel). But what I don't understand is this. Driving at 80k/h in 5th my tacho reads 2.25k revs and the boost gauge is reading 2. If I am stationary and I increase the revs to 2.25k my boost shows zero. Surely in both cases the amount of exhaust gas would be the same because of the same revs, therefore shouldnt the boost be the same? Sorry for the rambling. Jim
    Jim VK2MAD
    -------------------------
    '17 Isuzu D-Max

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kingston, Tassie, OZ.
    Posts
    13,728
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Its the heat energy in the exhaust gasses that drive the turbine . No load = no work = less heat out at the same revolutions.

    Jc
    The Isuzu 110. Solid and as dependable as a rock, coming soon with auto box😊
    The Range Rover L322 4.4.TTDV8 ....probably won't bother with the remap..😈

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Sussex Inlet. N.S.W.
    Posts
    6,638
    Total Downloaded
    0
    If the turbine is spun by the airflow volume and speed surely it would not make any difference if the air was hot or cold.
    Jim VK2MAD
    -------------------------
    '17 Isuzu D-Max

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Crafers West South Australia
    Posts
    11,731
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by jx2mad View Post
    If the turbine is spun by the airflow volume and speed surely it would not make any difference if the air was hot or cold.
    I think you've forgotten about one important variable: the fuel that's being burnt. Fast idle = small amount of fuel burnt = small explosions. Cruising = bigger amount of fuel burnt = bigger explosions. The only way you can make air flow in equal air flow out through the turbine is to drive with your foot right off the accelerator. Hot gas from bigger explosions expands via the turbine, cools and transfers energy to the intake turbine. This increases the input flow, allowing more fuel to be burnt cleanly, ergo more output flow, until you hit the wastegate or the limits of the turbo. Exhaust gas typically cools by around 100C across a working turbo. The exhaust gas pressure drops with the temperature as the gas expands inside the turbine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Sussex Inlet. N.S.W.
    Posts
    6,638
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Thanks,, I bow to superior knowledge. Jim
    Jim VK2MAD
    -------------------------
    '17 Isuzu D-Max

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Search AULRO.com ONLY!
Search All the Web!