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Thread: cooking oil cheaper than diesel

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Williamstown, Barossa, SA
    Posts
    3,375
    We all have opinions, weather they are righr or wrong... And here's mine..... I collect and filter WVO and run it in several vehicles on it. My tractor lives on it and my 1990 VW Golf Tdi runs it too.. A friend has a well organised processing plant running which is blissfully simple. It involves 6 IBC's and a series of filters and pumps. Stack them up in two stands of three.. The first top IBC is the collection drum. Everything goes in here and stands for 6 months min. This is the most important stage as all the water and crap settles out. 400mm from the bottom of this drum is a 13mm outlet, which flows thru a fine hydraulic gauze filter into the next tank below. At the bottom of the first tank is the messy bit.... and yeah, it stinks but needs to be drained periodically... (water, sludge, dirt, food etc.. burn it or bury it!) The process is repeated again into the lower tank. Here it should be clear and resemble new oil. If so it is pumped into the second top tank via a standard diesel fuel filter and allowed over the course of several weeks to run thru a very fine filter (5 microns) into the 5 th tank. If not, it gets returned to the second tank for filtering and settling again. From the 5th tank it again flows thru another 5 micron filter and into the last tank where it is ready for use. It should look like this..... (RH jar)..
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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Williamstown, Barossa, SA
    Posts
    3,375
    Once you've gone thru the filtering process and have your bottom IBC full, it can be transferred into a diesel bowser or rain water tank on the outside of the building which disguises the fact its there... From here you are able to complete the final stage of the process... You have a clear 20 litre drum marked on the side at 16 LT and 18 LT. In winter fill your drum to the 16 LT mark and top up with 4 LT of ULP. In summer fill to the 18 LT mark and top up with 2 LT of ULP. You've made your first brew!! Re TD5's... I ran a 130 Td5 for several years but was never game enough to run it on brew. Once the Cummins 6Bt is in the 101 though, it will live on it!! That does not mean to say a Td5 won't run on it, but I was always taught that Bosch pumps are fine, Lucas pumps are a NO as they break the drive shaft, and Common Rail is a no due to the fine tolerances and high pressures involved. My Golf is now at 400000kms and still runs smelling like a chip shop! Incidentally, Australian diesel is some of the poorest quality in the world, so you prob won't harm the Td5 if you did try it.... Even the dirty veg oil looks cleaner than diesel!!
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    13,793
    Quote Originally Posted by Sitec View Post
    ...Incidentally, Australian diesel is some of the poorest quality in the world, ...
    Sorry, but that is a pile of poo.

    Your post are focussed on the cleanliness of WVO, which is only one part, the chemical composition, flame speeds, cetane number, etc, etc is just as important.

    Several studies have found that WVO/SVO builds up heavy carbon deposits on injectors and pistons. There are (anecdotal) reports that frequent use of injector cleaner can mitigate against this.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    265
    G'day all,
    As someone who has been making Bio-Diesel for nearly 15 years and having run over 200,k on my fuel , WVO is not a suitable fuel for TD5's in my opinion, even if diluted . The main issue is the glycerin, which is the reason veggie oil is thick!, when burnt in the cylinders, this can leave gums, varnishes and is very difficult to remove. Even diluting WVO does not remove the glycerin and it can still cause problems in the fuel system, plus I don't know how the fuel pump in the TD5 would like the cold oil?? The reason for making Bio- diesel is to remove the glycerin from the oil and replace it with alcohol,(in a simplified term), this makes a fuel that ( if made to standard) is suitable in any diesel engine, depending on component suitably!,On that point, I have found that most aftermarket fuel filters are not suitable for Bio-Diesel due to the lesser quality plastics in the make up, which break down and stick components.
    As others have said RB, in older engines you may get away with WVO, but in newer ones like the TD5, I would not try it.
    Cheers Gregg
    P.S I still have fuel available, see my add in the verandah

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