Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Is your handbrake drum leaking oil?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    362

    Is your handbrake drum leaking oil?

    So, today I decided to fix the oil leak in my Perentie's handbrake drum.
    Edit: and kill a few other birds with the same stone.
    Edit: I've added quotes from other members - and will continue to do so as they are posted.

    I had thoroughly researched this, but was a first time doing the repair.
    In the absence of any pictures or specific tutorial, I decided to make note of each step and post the process here.

    Note 1: I am NOT a mechanic.
    Note 2: I am NOT an expert.

    If anything is incorrect/bad practice/stupid - speak up and I'll edit the post accordingly.

    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Perentie Handbrake drum oil leak repair:
    --------------------------------------------------------------

    You will need:
    Extra Pair of hands (optional but handy)13, 14, 17, 18mm ring spanners.
    1/2 short extensions socket
    30mm socket and breaker bar/rattle gun (if memory serves correctly)
    (used backwards with 13mm open end spanner on transfer drain plug)
    Impact driver (see below for image)
    Appropriate posidrive driver bit for impact driver (important - not phillips)
    New output shaft seal
    Oil resistant RTV gasket maker.
    More engine oil for transfer case.
    Rags (lots of)
    Oil Pan (or bucket)
    Brake cleaner (spray pack)
    Degreaser (lots of)
    All the usual other backup tools and fluids.
    Other Member suggestions:
    Prop shaft tool (BadCo.)
    Seal Puller (BadCo.)

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    Step 1:
    Handbrake off - engage first gear.
    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    its also advisable to ensure the CDL is engaged before you start.
    Place wheel chocks (very important)

    Remove tailshaft

    Start with differential end first.

    Be wary of cross-threaded nuts.
    Be prepared to find new ones - In fact, I recommend removing one and going to find them - you will need 8 - must be nylocks.
    Not sure at time of writing if they are BSF or NF thread.

    Note: use some hootchie cord or similar to hang the shaft from the undercarriage. you will need to lift it up enough to change the articulation of the uni joint at the transfer case end so that a spanner can get in.

    Be warned - this is a tedious process, and the longest part of the whole process.


    -------------------------------------------------------

    Step 2:
    Find the correct posidrive driver bit to fit the two screws on the handbrake drum.

    Tip: most people choose a bit that's around 2 sizes too small.
    phillips and posidrive are counter-intuitive like this.
    This is a minor point, but can ruin your day, and/or week.

    Adjust direction of impact driver, insert into screw with tension, then smack firmly with hammer. (yes you heard me! hit it!)

    If all went according to plan, these should come out easily.



    -----------------------------------------------------

    Step 3:

    Remove handbrake drum.

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    before you remove the brake drum reapply the handbrake and then undo the big nut hidden by the prop shaft. you can then either remove the handbrake drum and the flange as one piece or seperate them.
    Check that handbrake is off, you are in 1st gear, and that wheel chocks have not been stolen (depending on your location).

    If anything near here has been leaking, your drum and pads will be soaking in a nice warm oil bath, and will have been for some time.

    This is where the brake cleaner is handy. clean the drum - but leave the pads for after - there is logic in this madness trust me.





    ----------------------------------------------------

    Step 4:

    Place oil pan directly under handbrake assembly
    (yes now is the best time to do it)

    Remove the Shaft seal nut. (off memory this is a 30mm nut)
    Make sure you are in gear before attempting this.

    Oil will now leak everywhere.
    Good time to get that cold one I mentioned earlier.

    Now you can drop all the oil ahead of time, and not have to worry about this, but I find that this tends to flush out any dirt and debris that may have got into the seal and caused it to fail.
    Kind of like a bleeding wound, helps keep some of the bacteria at bay.

    Note the felt seal on the shaft - I have it on good authority from the guys over at AULRO.com, that this needs to be removed and discarded.

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    I advise replacing the felt washer with a new one, smothering one side of it with goop and installing it goop outwards and then putting more goop on the washer.
    It will be replaced with gasket goo later.

    Note: on mine, and I understand many others, the bolts on the output shaft flange are welded in place, if not, I suggest getting this done.
    You won't need to learn new profanities this way.





    -----------------------------------------------------

    Step 5:

    Remove the two lower bolts beneath the output shaft and remove the retaining ring clamp. (unsure of correct terminology here)

    This will need a clean with degreaser and a rag.





    ----------------------------------------------------

    Step 6:

    Remove the retaining ring (unsure of correct terminology here) with large flat blade screwdriver, using a twisting action in the provided slot at the bottom of the shaft sleeve.

    Note: the body of the transfer case and output shaft sleeve is aluminium, be firm but gentle, it can be tricky to get a good angle with the brake shoe in place.

    The time-rich sorts may wish to remove the pads and soak them in brake cleaner for a couple of days.



    --------------------------------------------------------------

    Step 7:

    Pry out the old seal.

    CAUTION!: do not insert screwdriver too far, or pry from the outside.

    If you damage this surface, and you can very easily, it will destroy the ability of the new seal to do it's job.

    Inserting a screwdriver sideways and gently tapping laterally with a hammer or similar, and working your way around seems to work well.
    To clarify - DO NOT use the screwdriver like a chisel, use it like a lever instead.

    Patience again, is your friend here, perhaps check to see if you have another cold one on ice.



    ----------------------------------------------------

    Step 8:

    The bearing is exposed!, better shove the new seal in.... with care
    Off memory, there was no seating lip in the shaft sleeve, this makes life fun when positioning the seal squarely.



    Note: the seal is a neoprene coated steel ring, with a tension sprint on the inner flexible rubber section.
    A little oil on the seal will make your life much easier at this point.

    to get the seal level, I inserted it and gently tapped it into place with very small soft face hammer. You may need to improvise here.

    I then took a 10mm bolt and two nuts, and tightened them against each on said bolt, with exactly 3.5mm bolt exposed when measured from the nut face.

    I used this to tap the seal into place (very gently), and unfortunately got a little over zealous at one point and began to leave imprints on the sleeve face.

    I'll need to repair this at a later date, and I welcome better suggestions (insert better suggestion from other member here

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    rather than trying to put the seal in the hard way if you have separated the output flange from the hand brake drum, just turn it around and tap it gently home.


    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Step 9:

    Discard felt washer, and old output seal after inspecting for damage.
    (it's worth doing for future reference)

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    I advise replacing the felt washer with a new one, smothering one side of it with goop and installing it goop outwards and then putting more goop on the washer. Theres is no tangible proof that my reasons are valid but IMHO, it stops goop from being extruded between the slpines up into the Tcase and give you a "break point" for the goop for the next mechanic.


    Re-install output shaft flange assembly onto spline shaft.

    Get some gasket maker, and smear a little inside, and also coat the output shaft-seal-nut-washer with a generous amount.





    Replace washer, Replace nut, Tighten to appropriate tension.



    Have another cold one or two while the goo sets (usually around 2 hours)


    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Step 10:


    Clean drum with brake cleaner (if not already done) clean brake pads (I did this in-situ).
    Be careful to keep this stuff away from the shaft seal and nut area, it can wick in, and will degrade the oil and rubber.

    If paranoid or too drunk to coordinate a spray pack, wrap rag around output flange.... you know that blurry thing in the middle....

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    wrap the output body in a large parts or ziploc bag and ziptie it onto the output housing before you go spraying anything, likewise cover the actuator mechanism at the bottom. althouth I reccomend taking the shoes out and cleaning and properly lubing the acutator mechanism.
    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Busted Syncro
    First use Brakleen to remove the oil from the shoes. I do this many times and use a rag to remove the oil/brakleen mix. Then when the wife is out I put them in the oven so they become very hot to touch. A lot of oil comes out when the shoes are hot. Use more Brakleen. Do this process until all the oil is gone.
    Replace drum when done - ensuring that the two screw holes line up.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------


    Step 11:

    Replace posidrive screws with impact driver - reverse of removal.

    Replace tailshaft
    Note: tailshaft bolt holes are NOT symmetrically positioned.
    Take care to align them correctly.

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    If you dont have the correct nyloc nuts or you need to reuse your nylocs make sure the threads are oil free and use loctite 243..... once you have all the bolts tightened up with the propshaft in place paint mark the outside of the nuts to the flange, if the paint cracks its come loose.
    Note: take care not to crossthread the fine thread bolts.
    Otherwise, next time you do this, you will need a few more cold ones, and an angle grinder..

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Step 12:

    Remove fill plug on transfer case, and top up till it leaks back out the hole.



    Use some more of that RTV gasket goo on the thread when putting the plug back in.

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Blknight.aus
    DO NOT use ATV goop on the thread for the filler use loctite 567 or thread tape.
    Tip: use the 1/2 inch drive extension socket backwards on the fill plug, then use a 1/2 inch or 13mm spanner on the other end, and then maybe some pipe as well.

    Or, get the proper plug removal tool like I did this time, and a breaker bar.

    ---------------------------------------------------------

    Step 13:

    Cleanup....

    Use the degreaser to clean the copious amount of oil off your last cold one... and then later the driveway, tools, hands, infant child, child's toys, and oily infant handprints up the side of your nice white, freshly detailed xtrail - so the wife doesn't kill you.

    Reclaim breaker bar from toilet and reclaim spare output shaft seal from child's mouth.

    Pretty much, you should be done.

    Check perodically for leaks.

    I also took the time to check my drive flange bolts.
    Was glad I did, I recommend you do to while you have the rattle gun/breaker bar out.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Land Rover 110 Perentie GS 4X4 ARN 51-426
    "Ich Dien"----------"Die with your boots on"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Waitakere, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,274
    Nice work drano, that was a good read. Mine isn't leaking but I'll keep this in mind for when it does.

    Just two things to make other peoples lives easier.

    Prop Shaft Tool
    If you ever plan to remove the prop shafts more then once then you need this tool. It has a slim head to fit in the yokes.

    Seal Puller
    I have never used one but they must exist for a reason probably more effective then a screw driver at least.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourn(ish)
    Posts
    25,104
    Quote Originally Posted by dranoweb View Post
    So, today I decided to fix the oil leak in my Perentie's handbrake drum.

    I had thoroughly researched this, but was a first time doing the repair.
    In the absence of any pictures or specific tutorial, I decided to make note of each step and post the process here.

    Note 1: I am NOT a mechanic.
    Note 2: I am NOT an expert.

    You may as well be, you have essentially nailed the EMEI for the job.

    few little things I advise doing differently

    1. before you remove the brake drum reapply the handbrake and then undo the big nut hidden by the prop shaft. you can then either remove the handbrake drum and the flange as one piece or seperate them. its also advisable to ensure the CDL is engaged before you start.

    sometimes the leak is not from the rear seal its from the flange nut, if this is the case you will have oil on the back of the drum and if you're unlucky inside the drum and on the shoes.

    2. rather than trying to put the seal in the hard way if you have separated the output flange from the hand brake drum, just turn it around and tap it gently home.

    3. I advise replacing the felt washer with a new one, smothering one side of it with goop and installing it goop outwards and then putting more goop on the washer. Theres is no tangible proof that my reasons are valid but IMHO, it stops goop from being extruded between the slpines up into the Tcase and give you a "break point" for the goop for the next mechanic.

    4. if you dont have the correct nyloc nuts or you need to reuse your nylocs make sure the threads are oil free and use loctite 243.

    5. once you have all the bolts tightened up with the propshaft in place paint mark the outside of the nuts to the flange, if the paint cracks its come loose.

    wrap the output body in a large parts or ziploc bag and ziptie it onto the output housing before you go spraying anything, likewise cover the actuator mechanism at the bottom. althouth I reccomend taking the shoes out and cleaning and properly lubing the acutator mechanism.

    if you use a thin wall 3/8th drive socket (snap on fit) or the specialist tool you can break off all 8 of the nuts, you get to the ones on the hand brake at about the 11 or 1 oclock position and on the diff at 5 and 7.

    when you get the tcase flange off inspect it for "tacked" in bolts, replace the bolts if they have.

    DO NOT use ATV goop on the thread for the filler use loctite 567 or thread tape.
    Dave

    "In a Landrover the other vehicle is your crumple zone."

    For spelling call Rogets, for mechanicing call me.

    Fozzy, 2.25D SIII Ex DCA Ute
    TDI D1(parting/ed)
    Tdi autoManual d1 (Kept it for the girlfriend)
    Archaeopteryx 1990 6x6 dual cab(This things staying)


    If you've benefited from one or more of my posts please remember, your taxes paid for my skill sets, I'm just trying to make sure you get your monies worth.
    If you think you're in front on the deal, pay it forwards.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    125
    G'day All,
    Excellent post. I'm a series man however, if the handbrake shoes are contaminated with oil this is what I do to clean them.(The series handbrake shoes are hard to get now)
    First use Brakleen to remove the oil from the shoes. I do this many times and use a rag to remove the oil/brakleen mix. Then when the wife is out I put them in the oven so they become very hot to touch. A lot of oil comes out when the shoes are hot. Use more Brakleen. Do this process until all the oil is gone. Then lightly sand the lining and use a face mask on the series shoes.
    I note that the "Brakleen" formula is changing as set out in the latest MSDS and moving away from Tetrachoroethylene.
    Hope this helps
    Chris
    Last edited by Busted Syncro; 15th March 2016 at 04:26 PM. Reason: Typo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Avoca Beach
    Posts
    11,866
    Or you could do what my wife did and drive with the handbrake on for a while until it smokes.
    It didn't work well before with the oil on it, but it works much better now.
    Regards Philip A

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    362
    Some handy notes - and demonstrates why I have been starting these threads - we all learn.

    The atv goo was on hand at the time and was used sparingly.

    The original felt washer had already been gooed up, and was torn. New one was difficult to find.

    Original seal also had a nick, looks like install damage, otherwise appeared new. Possibly from overhaul before disposal in 2012.

    I'll remember to remove the whole drum assembly next time - I may go back and re-do a few things as I have spare seals.

    In any case, I don't have oil spraying up through the rifle holders now...




    Sent from my E6653 using AULRO mobile app
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Land Rover 110 Perentie GS 4X4 ARN 51-426
    "Ich Dien"----------"Die with your boots on"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    362
    Just finished adding some quotes from you guys, to save people sifting through all the replies that may eventually build up.

    Any more tips will be welcome,
    I'll try to find the time to do this to the window felt thread too.
    Land Rover 110 Perentie GS 4X4 ARN 51-426
    "Ich Dien"----------"Die with your boots on"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourn(ish)
    Posts
    25,104
    Quote Originally Posted by dranoweb View Post
    Just finished adding some quotes from you guys, to save people sifting through all the replies that may eventually build up.

    Any more tips will be welcome,
    I'll try to find the time to do this to the window felt thread too.
    Nother sign of a professional...
    Dave

    "In a Landrover the other vehicle is your crumple zone."

    For spelling call Rogets, for mechanicing call me.

    Fozzy, 2.25D SIII Ex DCA Ute
    TDI D1(parting/ed)
    Tdi autoManual d1 (Kept it for the girlfriend)
    Archaeopteryx 1990 6x6 dual cab(This things staying)


    If you've benefited from one or more of my posts please remember, your taxes paid for my skill sets, I'm just trying to make sure you get your monies worth.
    If you think you're in front on the deal, pay it forwards.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    362
    Just trying to do the job right the first time.

    I don't like mechanical work - I used to have a brother for that, but after some ill thought out false accusations, he is no longer with us.

    So, I gotta nut this stuff out myself now - and when it's my rig, and also the one my wife and child drive, I like to know it's done properly.

    I'm an electrical, electronic, machine programmer by trade.
    Land Rover 110 Perentie GS 4X4 ARN 51-426
    "Ich Dien"----------"Die with your boots on"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourn(ish)
    Posts
    25,104
    probably better reasons than mine for trying to get it right first time....

    Im just too lazy to be bothered to do things twice.
    Dave

    "In a Landrover the other vehicle is your crumple zone."

    For spelling call Rogets, for mechanicing call me.

    Fozzy, 2.25D SIII Ex DCA Ute
    TDI D1(parting/ed)
    Tdi autoManual d1 (Kept it for the girlfriend)
    Archaeopteryx 1990 6x6 dual cab(This things staying)


    If you've benefited from one or more of my posts please remember, your taxes paid for my skill sets, I'm just trying to make sure you get your monies worth.
    If you think you're in front on the deal, pay it forwards.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Search AULRO.com ONLY!
Search All the Web!