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Thread: Hub nut - why is it so tight?

  1. #1
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    Feb 2011
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    Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
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    Question Hub nut - why is it so tight?

    Having just undone one of the hub nuts on my D2a to replace a ripped boot on the Ashcroft CV's. I was wondering why it is to tight.

    The wheel is secured to the hub via five wheel nuts, and the hub is secured to the steering knuckle by four bolts, and the steering knuckle is secured to the differential by the upper and lower ball joint.

    The driveshaft is secured to the hub by the hub nut, but the other end of the driveshaft is a loose slide fit into the diff centre. So why then is the hub nut so tight?

    The driveshaft doesn't seem to be able to move anywhere at the diff centre end seems to only fit so far into the diff centre before stopping and the CV bell side can't fit through the hub. So what could happen if the vehicle was driven with a loose hub nut or even no hub nut fitted?

  2. #2
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    12,477
    Probably the splines would wear out. See Defender axle caps posts.
    Regards Philip A

  3. #3
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    What would eventually happen is the flange on the axle would burn out the axle seal , also allowing torque reaction forces to eventually introduce chatter on the splines , resulting in , as Philip A has mentioned, splines wearing out

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    brighton, brisbane
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    Each wheel hub consists of a hub flange pressed into a hub bearing. The hub flange is splined to accept the outboard end of the drive shaft, which is secured to the hub flange with a stake nut / hub nut,[ 490 Nm] The outer race of the hub bearing is bolted to the end of the axle casing. An ' O ' ring seals the joint between the outer race and the axle casing to prevent leakage of diff oil.


    Now, my experience of replacing the 'O ' ring seal on my left rear axle. Got to the stage of tensioning the hub nut, my good friend the truckie next door had a torque multiplier which would have enabled me to get 490 Nm on my tension wrench, but he wasn't home, and I was too impatient to wait. Tightened the hell out of the nut, using a spanner & persuader, took the D2 for a drive, slowly, got to the nearest roundabout, crapped myself when the left rear wheel wobbled. Drove slowly home, waited for mate, grabbed the multiplier, tensioned to 490 Nm [ had a way to go. ] All good since.


    So, at best, the oil seal will leak diff oil, at worst, the wheel will feel like it is falling off. I broke my rule of not taking short cuts. The hub nut holds it all together, it's also a sobering thought that, besides the 490 Nm , only a 'stake ' keeps the nut in position. I make a point of raising each wheel at service time, & before big trips, to check for movement [ wheel bearing or hub nut] Bob
    halfbacks were invented to stop prop forwards taking over the world.

    Ladies, if a man says he will fix it, he will. There is no need to remind him every 6 months about it.

  5. #5
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    Mostly it is just to prevent axle spline wear. You will notice a click when on and off the throttle if they come loose. There is no interaction at all with the wheel bearing .

    Jc
    The Isuzu 110. Solid and as dependable as a rock, coming soon with auto box😊
    The Range Rover L322 4.4.TTDV8 ....probably won't bother with the remap..😈

  6. #6
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    Thanks for that. As I understand it, the outer face of the hub bearing is bolted to the end of the axle casing. The hub flange & hub bearing are pressed together, and together are known as the axle hub. The hub nut tensions the hub flange onto the axle spline, and is an essential part of the system. Am I correct in thinking this, if not, could you put me straight, Bob
    halfbacks were invented to stop prop forwards taking over the world.

    Ladies, if a man says he will fix it, he will. There is no need to remind him every 6 months about it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Brisbane Inner West
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    63

    Torque hub nut to 490nm?

    Quote Originally Posted by twr7cx View Post
    Having just undone one of the hub nuts on my D2a to replace a ripped boot on the Ashcroft CV's. I was wondering why it is to tight.

    The wheel is secured to the hub via five wheel nuts, and the hub is secured to the steering knuckle by four bolts, and the steering knuckle is secured to the differential by the upper and lower ball joint.

    The driveshaft is secured to the hub by the hub nut, but the other end of the driveshaft is a loose slide fit into the diff centre. So why then is the hub nut so tight?

    The driveshaft doesn't seem to be able to move anywhere at the diff centre end seems to only fit so far into the diff centre before stopping and the CV bell side can't fit through the hub. So what could happen if the vehicle was driven with a loose hub nut or even no hub nut fitted?
    490nm torque D2 rear hub nut no torque wrench

    I donít have a 490nm torque wrench and so did the following. I weigh 82kg which multiplied by 2.2 is 180pounds. At two feet this is 360foot pounds. At a factor of 1.35 this is 490nm. Simply adjust the distance for your weight. Mark the bar at the distance and gently step and bring full weight onto marked position. Do not shock load. I note the torque altered from 490nm to 340nm when loctite spec changed From 680 to 640. I used a different loctite but opted for the higher torque to be on the safe side. The pamphlet that came with the Timpken brand hub said 490nm. My mechanic questioned it and we googled it and decided to follow the pamphlet.
    Comments or thoughts?

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I used my Milwaukee gun and gave it some ugga dugga, done about 6 hubs and 100,000km and no be issues

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff86RRC View Post
    I note the torque altered from 490nm to 340nm when loctite spec changed From 680 to 640.
    Do you have any further details on this please?


    I don't use Loctite on them. Too many stories of being unable to seperate the shafts from the hubs with it. I've also stopped staking the hubs nuts - I just put some bright nail polish lines to be able to monitor if there is any shift. So far, over many many years and kms the hub nuts torqued up to 490Nm without Loctite and without being staked have not moved at all.
    Mine - modified MY03 LT L318 Discovery 2a HSE Td5 15P
    Hers - MY12 L319 Discovery 4 2.7L TDV6
    Dads - MY98 LJ Discovery ES 3.9L V8

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Inner West
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    63

    Hub nut torque change

    Quote Originally Posted by twr7cx View Post
    Do you have any further details on this please?


    I don't use Loctite on them. Too many stories of being unable to seperate the shafts from the hubs with it. I've also stopped staking the hubs nuts - I just put some bright nail polish lines to be able to monitor if there is any shift. So far, over many many years and kms the hub nuts torqued up to 490Nm without Loctite and without being staked have not moved at all.
    When I researched it I read it on a forum. Thought it was AULRO but was the uk one. Sorry it was Discovery 2 2004 TD5 Landmark rear hub nut torque | LandyZone - Land Rover Forum
    anyway I went for 490 AND staked the nut but my loctite is another brand so I just hope for the best
    cheers

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