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Thread: MF165 Project

  1. #131
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    pull a couple of the bolts out that hold it together for sizing and buy a 4 really long studs/bolts so you can keep it aligned/together while apart.... its the only way I can line up the lt230 transfer to get it back together. as well.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    All those years ago my new MF165 has a sticking clutch. It was split under warranty, on the farm in the car garage, as that was the only concrete bit of floor that we had. Cannot recall any problem doing it, and did not take long. That was when I learned to use a bit of grease of anti-seize on the splines.

    In another life I worked as the leading hand fitter in a brickworks. (I am actually an electrical fitter by trade). We had a bit of everything; 5 or 6 road trucks, all different, caterpillar frontend loaders, both wheeled and tracked, roller crushing plant, the actual brick extruder, oil fired Scotch kilns and various pumps and such like.

    But the killer was the assorted Fergy TE20 and petrol MF35's all fitted with a rear fork lift for moving the pallets of bricks around. These were all driven around the plant at breakneck speed by frustrated young speedway drivers. It was a bit of a rabbit warren, so many stops, starts and general slipping the clutch during use. It was not unusual to have to replace a clutch on one of them 1 or 2 times a month. I also made up a small jig and carrier to move the front end. With the forks down the back half only needed a jack under it and just wheeled the front half away. Don't recall having any problem lining them up again, and I think that I only had a rough clutch plate alignment tool, probably made up in the ancient old lathe we had.

    Don't recall much about the brakes, but they were also a regular replacement job. I was there about 18 months and I think that experience taught we a great deal later carried over to marine engineering.

  2. #132
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    A one off in the Mix

    Bought the original about 30 years ago .Handy but hard to steer ,unable to inch or slew so rebuilt with a Cummins diesei ,Holden hydromatic Gearbox ,Articulated frame ,new longer jib with hydraulic extension.A vast improvement

    Noel
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  3. #133
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
    Bought the original about 30 years ago .Handy but hard to steer ,unable to inch or slew so rebuilt with a Cummins diesei ,Holden hydromatic Gearbox ,Articulated frame ,new longer jib with hydraulic extension.A vast improvement

    Noel
    Ok, I'll bite .... What on earth is it LOL. It looks like an old cropmaster tractor in the first photo.

    MF165 Project-crane.jpg

    a huge number of weird and wonderful cranes popup on the facebook farming group. Old blitz truck conversions etc...
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    Proper cars--
    '92 Range Rover 3.9V8 ... slugomatic
    '92 Range Rover 3.8V8 ... 5spd manual
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I :burnrubber:
    '63 ID19 x 2 :wheelchair:
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas
    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual :zzz:

  4. #134
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    542
    There were many of those old cranes around the south west of WA used in timber mills. They were mostly built up on agricultural tractors. Another popular choice was an old army blitz buggy as mentioned.

  5. #135
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Ok, I'll bite .... What on earth is it LOL. It looks like an old cropmaster tractor in the first photo.

    a huge number of weird and wonderful cranes popup on the facebook farming group. Old blitz truck conversions etc...
    The name plate says The Fowler Hydraulic Jib Crane .Its based on a massy harris Inter with the seat and pedals facing the rear with the steering shaft passing under your left arm .Its main pro is that it is small and manoeuvrable compared to Blitz and other tractor cranes allowing it to work in side buildings


    Noel

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