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Thread: The art of organisation

  1. #1
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    The art of organisation

    I posted another thread hoping that it would be of some use to older people yearning to learn how to fly. So for those that could not understand what the thread was about, maybe the following will help. This is not all relevant to professional pilots, but more for recreational pilots. But at whatever class of pilot you are, being "professional" may well save your skin!

    The art of organisation

    The art of organisation | Flight Safety Australia

    I do not always agree with what this writer posts, but she does bring up some good points here. As always, helicopters are overlooked, and I can assure her that some of her points are not possible in a small piston powered helicopter. Which in fact, makes it even MORE important to be well organised before even starting the engine!

    She also assumes that everybody has an "iPad". But thousands of pilots for over 100 years seem to have managed without one!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Farang View Post
    I posted another thread hoping that it would be of some use to older people yearning to learn how to fly. So for those that could not understand what the thread was about, maybe the following will help. This is not all relevant to professional pilots, but more for recreational pilots. But at whatever class of pilot you are, being "professional" may well save your skin!

    The art of organisation


    The art of organisation | Flight Safety Australia

    I do not always agree with what this writer posts, but she does bring up some good points here. As always, helicopters are overlooked, and I can assure her that some of her points are not possible in a small piston powered helicopter. Which in fact, makes it even MORE important to be well organised before even starting the engine!

    She also assumes that everybody has an "iPad". But thousands of pilots for over 100 years seem to have managed without one!
    Hi Kevin,
    for almost 40 years I did my study for renewals and upgrades by hitting the books. Since 2012 I've been on the B737. Between it and my company, it has one of the worst manual suites EVER. I might be studying for my next check, let's say autolands. I have to reference the Boeing Vol 1 and 2, the QRH, the Flight Crew Training Manual, and the company Vol A1, Vol D1, and Jeppesen. We have to cross-reference between manuals to make sense of it all.

    Can't do that on an ipad. The company went to ipads about 3 years ago. Hard to have 7 manuals open and cross-reference it on a tiny ipad screen... and that's for just one topic.

    In flight, the optimum for me is the ipad for approach plates, and paper for maps. The problem with having maps on an ipad is you only have a tiny screen to display part of a map (big picture stuff when you're moving 8 miles a minute). And with Jepps, you only get limited information depending on your zoom level. Great if you're doing 100kt. Not so good at 465.

    In my experience with teaching older people to fly, I found that they needed quite a bit more briefing than the sprogs. I used to give them a fair bit more homework to do as well.
    In the practical, they would often take longer (some much longer) to get through sequences. It was also important for them to keep flying quite regularly, as this would minimise the time spent on revision.
    Having said that, I found the more mature students safer and more conservative, and less likely to take risks.

    When I was involved in pilot recruiting in the 2000's, I actually preferred pilots in their 40's and 50's. That was based on my experience as a captain who had flown with all age groups.
    Age and cunning will ALWAYS overcome youth and skill.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for your post, John. There is a huge difference between what you do and what Kreisha Ballantyne writes about. I suspect that she may be one of those types, and I am sure that you know them, that are legends in their own mind!

    There is no doubt that modern electronic devices have a place and many of them, such as GPS, have their place, but in the context of what she writes about, and from what I read, GA is where she is directing her comments. I am afraid that I learnt in the old school where a pencil and a VFR chart was all that I had! The old piston engine helicopters that I had to master were very adept at biting you if they thought for one second that you were not paying attention! Small helicopters of course are not designed for long cross country flights in places like Australia, but in the trackless outback you need to be able read and follow a map(or roads!) Larger turbine types such as used offshore, are of course much closer in operations to what you do.

    Anyway, I am glad to hear that you are still employed! Take care. Cheers

  4. #4
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    At the risk of getting off topic, I am reminded of one of my more interesting flights in Australia. From Lilydale (Melbourne) to a strip near the Edgar Ranges out of Broome WA. It was in an A36 Beech. Planned to overnight at Yulara on the outbound leg and Port Augusta on the return leg, refuelling at both locations on both legs, as well as at the destination. More or less almost the longest straight line flight possible in Australia.

    This was pre-GPS, so it was map and pencil. No navaids except an NDB at Yulara, from memory, and precious few landmarks either, except that Yulara has one of the biggest landmarks in the country. I planned (and had fuel) to divert to Broome and take a new departure if unable to find the strip.

    The first issue was that the night before my departure; Woomera restricted areas closed, 24hours notice to get a clearance. This meant diverting to the west over country with even fewer landmarks - the planned route had none at all.

    No problems at all on the outbound leg, although Uluru was surprisingly hard to spot from around 10,000ft - Mt Conner was easier. From Yulara, I carefully estimated drift from both the wind forecast and from apparent drift of burn patterns in the spinifex on the sandhills. And was sufficiently accurate to be able to spot the campa and nearby airstrip close to dead ahead, very close to ETA.

    Return trip had one issue - fuel pump at Port Augusta broke down, but I had enough fuel to fly to Port Pirie to refuel.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  5. #5
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    When my best mate learned to fly around 35 years ago, his flying instructor was an ex-RAAF pilot who had flown everything from the Vampires to the F-111 and F/A-18 and nearly everything inbetween. On the navigation route that he tasked his students, one of the waypoints was an abandoned farmhouse. When my mate got to that waypoint, all he saw was a flat concrete on the ground. On his return he was asked if he found the farmhouse OK, but my mate said he failed to find it so assumed he had failed the NavEx. Ron then laughed and said that all that was left was the concrete pad and he used it as a double-check to make sure his students weren't cheating when flying solo! Cunning bugger!
    Life is just a series of obstacles preventing you from taking a nap.

  6. #6
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    Interesting snippet about my flying instructor (Hoxton Park Flying School) - a couple of years ago I had to replace the offgrid) power system in my home after a lightning strike. It turns out that the company that did the insurance job was founded and owned by the son of the CFI who examined me for my PPL, and one of the workers on the new installation was his grandson.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  7. #7
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    JD, was that a McIver or a Ledergerber, or a White?
    Age and cunning will ALWAYS overcome youth and skill.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Jars View Post
    JD, was that a McIver or a Ledergerber, or a White?
    None of the above - Williams. I am scratching my brain as to his first name though. I'll have to see if I can find my first logbook - problem is, I put it somewhere safe!
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDNSW View Post
    None of the above - Williams. I am scratching my brain as to his first name though. I'll have to see if I can find my first logbook - problem is, I put it somewhere safe!
    Hi John,
    I used to hire from McIver Aviation at HOX. I have Laurie McIver in my logbook. Renee Ledergerber was the CFI at the Beech Aero centre (can't think of its name). I remember an Alan White from one of the schools there.

    John R.
    Age and cunning will ALWAYS overcome youth and skill.

  10. #10
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    Hugh, I suspect you may have been a bit after my time - '66-'67! I finished my cross countrys with RQAC at Archerfield, as, my work location having moved, it was more convenient. Bought an Auster as soon as I finished the PPL, traded it on the C180 when I got moved to PNG.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

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