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Thread: Wanted Dead

  1. #61
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    Eevo is offline OldBushie Gold Subscriber
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    its cruel to keep cats locked-up.
    ive got no problem with registering, micro-chipping and sterilising though.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eevo View Post
    its cruel to keep cats locked-up.
    ive got no problem with registering, micro-chipping and sterilising though.
    And they will keep hunting for the rest of their life.
    Not a solution IMO

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chucaro View Post
    And they will keep hunting for the rest of their life.
    Not a solution IMO
    the cat i used to look after (my ex now has it), we were able to train it to hunt but not kill. except for millipedes. it had too much fun playing hockey with them. that and we have a bell on him. doesnt matter how hard he tries, he cant sneak up on them.


    im not the best person to explain it, but cats are happy when they hunt. keeping them inside is cruel. like prison.

    i do understand that doesnt help the native bird population.
    banning cats would be a better idea but politically unacceptable.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumbles View Post
    An 06 does the same thing.......
    30 06 AND my favourite 25-06

    I find cats are a lot more shy of the spotlight than any other predator, but when you get one it's more satisfying than a dozen foxes.

    Wamsley’s War (2000) clip 1 on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

    Anyone remember the cat hat man from Adelaide? Rural legend...in 1990 it was illegal for him to destroy a feral cat in HIS wildlife sanctuary, so he got the law changed by wearing a hat made of feral cat skin.

  5. #65
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    It's a shame all those feral cat's can't decimate all those bloody Indian Myna birds . Then get rid of the cat's !! One can only live in hope ...Jim

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimr1 View Post
    It's a shame all those feral cat's can't decimate all those bloody Indian Myna birds . Then get rid of the cat's !! One can only live in hope ...Jim
    ....or the cane toads

  7. #67
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    AlertMe

    Quote Originally Posted by scarry View Post
    ...

    As for cats,we generally use a .222 on them.
    A good dog also helps,shooting them out of a tree is easy...

    This should be a new Australian-ism (idiom) - "As easy as shooting cats in a tree" ... replaces ... 'As easy as shooting fish in a barrel'

    *Shooting fish in a barrel is an idiom, describing an effortless or simple action, with guaranteed success. The Mythbusters team tested and proved the accuracy of their interpretation of the idiom. If the fish does not die from the shot, it is quite likely to die from the shockwave.

    Edit - done https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/like_..._tree#Synonyms

  8. #68
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    Smile

    Wamsley’s War (2000) clip 1 on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

    "This clip shows John Wamsley, founder of Earth Sanctuaries, talking about his controversial hat made from feral cat skins, and how the hat was instrumental in his campaign to make it legal for operators of wildlife sanctuaries to destroy cats found on their property. Archival footage shows Wamsley at an official function, where his hat attracts some startled reactions from onlookers. In a piece to camera he suggests that it is possible to change a law by 'making a nuisance of yourself?.

    Educational value points

    Dr John Wamsley, a campaigner against the destruction caused by feral cats, is the founder of a number of privately run wildlife sanctuaries. Wamsley grew up in the bush and says he witnessed first-hand the devastating effects of cats and foxes on the environment. He regards cats as the 'number one? threat to Australian wildlife, although his critics believe he underplays the legacy of human activities, such as land clearing, farming and mining, on biodiversity.

    Wamsley?s hat is made from the skin, or pelt, of a feral cat. Wamsley became known as the 'man in the cat hat? after he wore this hat at the 1991 South Australian Tourism Awards to receive an award for his Warrawong Wildlife Sanctuary. The stunt made the front pages of most Australian newspapers and even received international coverage. It also helped raise awareness about the threat that cats pose to the environment and led to a change in state and federal laws to allow feral cat control in parks, reserves and sanctuaries across Australia.

    Feral cats are found in most habitats across Australia, with the feral cat population estimated at 3?6 million. 'Feral? refers to wild populations of previously domestic species. Cats were introduced to Australia by European settlers, who took their domestic cats with them as they settled the country. By the 1850s feral cat colonies had become established. Intentional releases were also made in the late 1800s in the hope that cats would control rabbits, rats and mice.

    The clip refers to the problem posed by feral cats, which have caused some species, particularly ground-dwelling birds, reptiles and mammals, to become extinct or endangered. Researchers believe that on average each feral cat kills 1,000 small-to-medium animals each year. A domestic cat kills about 32 animals per year. Cats have also introduced diseases that have killed indigenous wildlife.

    Feral species can undermine the environment. In Australia rabbits, cats, goats, pigs and a number of other domesticated animals that have few natural predators and high reproductive rates have successfully established feral populations. They present an ongoing threat to indigenous species through hunting, competition for food and shelter, destruction of habitat and spreading disease. Some feral animals trample and graze on vegetation that provides food and shelter for native animals. They can also cause soil erosion.

    Feral cats have no natural predators in Australia, are wary of traps, do not readily take baits and avoid humans. There is currently no effective, humane, large-scale technique to control their population. The presence of unneutered domestic cats under poor supervision also hampers their control. Even when cats are eradicated from an area, they quickly recolonise it.

    In Australia at present, attempts to control feral cat numbers include shooting, poisoning and trapping. Some animal rights groups believe these methods can be inhumane and point out that in many states feral animals are excluded from the state and territory Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Acts, so that if a person kills a feral animal 'in a manner that causes unnecessary pain? they are not liable for prosecution.

    The clip makes reference to wildlife sanctuaries. By 2000 Wamsley had established 11 sanctuaries under the name 'Earth Sanctuaries?. He aimed to regenerate some of Australia?s original ecosystems by enclosing vast tracts of land, eliminating introduced species and reintroducing original plants and animals. However, critics argued that these were giant zoos and that the best way to protect biodiversity is to conserve whole ecosystems. In 2004 Wamsley was forced to sell his shares in Earth Sanctuaries after a failed bid to list the company on the stock exchange."
    Edit/Delete Message

  9. #69
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    No rabbits, rats, mice, sparrows, starlings and black birds.
    Bliss. Until then, where's my .22?

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greatsouthernland View Post
    Wamsley’s War (2000) clip 1 on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

    "This clip shows John Wamsley, founder of Earth Sanctuaries, talking about his controversial hat made from feral cat skins, and how the hat was instrumental in his campaign to make it legal for operators of wildlife sanctuaries to destroy cats found on their property. Archival footage shows Wamsley at an official function, where his hat attracts some startled reactions from onlookers. In a piece to camera he suggests that it is possible to change a law by 'making a nuisance of yourself?.

    Educational value points

    Dr John Wamsley, a campaigner against the destruction caused by feral cats, is the founder of a number of privately run wildlife sanctuaries. Wamsley grew up in the bush and says he witnessed first-hand the devastating effects of cats and foxes on the environment. He regards cats as the 'number one? threat to Australian wildlife, although his critics believe he underplays the legacy of human activities, such as land clearing, farming and mining, on biodiversity.

    Wamsley?s hat is made from the skin, or pelt, of a feral cat. Wamsley became known as the 'man in the cat hat? after he wore this hat at the 1991 South Australian Tourism Awards to receive an award for his Warrawong Wildlife Sanctuary. The stunt made the front pages of most Australian newspapers and even received international coverage. It also helped raise awareness about the threat that cats pose to the environment and led to a change in state and federal laws to allow feral cat control in parks, reserves and sanctuaries across Australia.

    Feral cats are found in most habitats across Australia, with the feral cat population estimated at 3?6 million. 'Feral? refers to wild populations of previously domestic species. Cats were introduced to Australia by European settlers, who took their domestic cats with them as they settled the country. By the 1850s feral cat colonies had become established. Intentional releases were also made in the late 1800s in the hope that cats would control rabbits, rats and mice.

    The clip refers to the problem posed by feral cats, which have caused some species, particularly ground-dwelling birds, reptiles and mammals, to become extinct or endangered. Researchers believe that on average each feral cat kills 1,000 small-to-medium animals each year. A domestic cat kills about 32 animals per year. Cats have also introduced diseases that have killed indigenous wildlife.

    Feral species can undermine the environment. In Australia rabbits, cats, goats, pigs and a number of other domesticated animals that have few natural predators and high reproductive rates have successfully established feral populations. They present an ongoing threat to indigenous species through hunting, competition for food and shelter, destruction of habitat and spreading disease. Some feral animals trample and graze on vegetation that provides food and shelter for native animals. They can also cause soil erosion.

    Feral cats have no natural predators in Australia, are wary of traps, do not readily take baits and avoid humans. There is currently no effective, humane, large-scale technique to control their population. The presence of unneutered domestic cats under poor supervision also hampers their control. Even when cats are eradicated from an area, they quickly recolonise it.

    In Australia at present, attempts to control feral cat numbers include shooting, poisoning and trapping. Some animal rights groups believe these methods can be inhumane and point out that in many states feral animals are excluded from the state and territory Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Acts, so that if a person kills a feral animal 'in a manner that causes unnecessary pain? they are not liable for prosecution.

    The clip makes reference to wildlife sanctuaries. By 2000 Wamsley had established 11 sanctuaries under the name 'Earth Sanctuaries?. He aimed to regenerate some of Australia?s original ecosystems by enclosing vast tracts of land, eliminating introduced species and reintroducing original plants and animals. However, critics argued that these were giant zoos and that the best way to protect biodiversity is to conserve whole ecosystems. In 2004 Wamsley was forced to sell his shares in Earth Sanctuaries after a failed bid to list the company on the stock exchange."
    Edit/Delete Message
    Too long, didn't read


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