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Thread: Interesting Old Equipment, Projects & Work Places

  1. #111
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NW Tassie
    Posts
    1,844
    My mate is doing a full rebuilt on an fj holden atm, it was total stripped down, all doors etc gutted, floor pan cut out and supported, Then all put in a very large tank of molasses. Been in for 10 days now. The bloke he is doing it for is a pain in the ass and keep changing his mind on the outcome he wants, In the last month he has change his mid 3 times on motor/gearbox combo which changes what floor pan gets welded back in.
    cheers
    blaze

  2. #112
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    732
    The Champs were 10 to 15 years old at this stage which for a vehicle of the vintage was a good run.
    I don't think the age of them had anything to do with it. They would have been well maintained, excessively in fact, but what made the ones imported by Archie Marshall so marketable was the fact that they ALL had such low mileage on them. Most of them under 10k miles. I used to help service one that a local farmer had and the vehicle could only be described as immaculate. I also met Archie Marshall at his sale yard and looked at the hundreds that he had in stock, albeit a rapid turn over. The only problem that I recall was dried out oil seals and some rubber parts.

    I have no idea how the Australian Army units were disposed of, as at that time they were all in the Eastern States and local dealers would have had first refusal. I believe that some of them were sent back to the UK.

    As far as I am aware ALL the ex military units sold in WA were imported by Archie Marshall. Mine was a civilian model and I have no idea how or when it came to WA.

  3. #113
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Adelaide Hills. South Australia
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    6,195
    Quote Originally Posted by Saitch View Post
    I'm pretty sure my 'Treasurer' would frown at the price of 20 litres of molasses for this use.

    Des, because there are three basic sections to the plough and each oddly shaped, I'm thinking an el cheapo, kiddies wading pool would be the go. Is there a 'Soda to Water' ratio to use? I'm assuming that there is a fair amount of Hydrogen produced by this process, so best out doors.

    I guess so I never gave it a thought to be honest.

    I can't locate my recipe for the moment but this bloke is on the right track & principle is the same.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEsVPoSEWJ0


    If you use a drum you can hang stuff in it. For my old Stationary engine I hung it on a chain hoist so it could be raised & lowered as reqd to allow the current to be varied



    Try googling Rust removal by Electrolysis

  4. #114
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Yass NSW
    Posts
    3,186
    200 litre "pickle drums " can be found for reasonable cost and would work well with either molassis or electrolisis rust removal ( the one on the right in the Ebay listing)

    Plastic Drum Water Storage Aprox 200L Had Food in it not Chemicals | eBay

    Regards,
    Tote
    Go home, your igloo is on fire....
    MY2016 Aintree Green Defender 130 Cab Chassis
    2007 Discovery 3 - Gone
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    1955 Series 1 86 - parts
    Assorted Falcons and Jeeps.....

  5. #115
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Adelaide Hills. South Australia
    Posts
    6,195
    Looking back my setup was not all that flash so try not to get bogged down with a lot of flannel & useless crap.

    The electrode I placed in the bottom of the drum, was a piece of lead sheet off cut with a cable just bolted on to it as a connection Not sure if that was - or ++ POS I think. This by design was sacraficial.
    The other cable from the charger was clamped to the engine. The lead sheet & the engine mustn't touch & the circuit was between the donk & the lead passing through the soda solution. Thinking about it the + &-- direction may not need to be big deal.

    It was perfect for de-rusting the cylinder block which was a honeycomb type. Could not see through the "fins" for rust but a few days later when hosed out it was perfectly clean & clear.

    I also used a steel 44 drum which had a plastic liner. I think it may have been an update from the old steel interior drums. Pure arse getting that one, but somehow I suspect it may have been for Aviation Fuel. (??????)

    Maybe some one here could elaborate.

    NB. Raising & lowering the parts into the drum alters the Amperage so be careful about overloading your charger.



    I will keep looking for the recipe but when I finished restoring olde worlde engines most of that was binned. From memory I got a few bags of Washing Soda from the Supermarket.

    It is nothing special so a few people here may have used this method & can tell you the ratio of water to Soda.


    Happy bubblings.

  6. #116
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Armstrong Creek, Qld
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    4,463
    The ploughman's handle is a bit over 1.8 metres long hence my thought of a pool style bath. Thanks for the food for thought.
    If I can't remember, then it never happened!

  7. #117
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Adelaide Hills. South Australia
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    6,195
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Farang View Post
    I don't think the age of them had anything to do with it. They would have been well maintained, excessively in fact, but what made the ones imported by Archie Marshall so marketable was the fact that they ALL had such low mileage on them. Most of them under 10k miles. I used to help service one that a local farmer had and the vehicle could only be described as immaculate. I also met Archie Marshall at his sale yard and looked at the hundreds that he had in stock, albeit a rapid turn over. The only problem that I recall was dried out oil seals and some rubber parts.

    I have no idea how the Australian Army units were disposed of, as at that time they were all in the Eastern States and local dealers would have had first refusal. I believe that some of them were sent back to the UK.

    As far as I am aware ALL the ex military units sold in WA were imported by Archie Marshall. Mine was a civilian model and I have no idea how or when it came to WA.

    Interesting.

    There is a bloke living on the mount that used to be in the Australian SAS who owns one that I saw probably 20 years ago SAS + WA= possible connection. I never saw it on the road but I think he used it to race up & down his father's property. Later on, I heard an Automatic weapon being rapidly fired from his general direction. So maybe he collected stuff.

  8. #118
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Adelaide Hills. South Australia
    Posts
    6,195
    Quote Originally Posted by Saitch View Post
    The ploughman's handle is a bit over 1.8 metres long hence my thought of a pool style bath. Thanks for the food for thought.
    Is the whole handle metal or only part thereof & clamped to timber?


    I suppose it could be dipped one end at a time if it is all metal OR, you could 'acksaw it in 'arf & reweld it post dip.


    You would only need to move your electrical clamps around to suit, but that's no biggy.



    Naaaaaaah, you wouldn't want to risk buggering up the appearance if you are like me with olde stuff.

  9. #119
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    732
    Project: Japan to Darwin by small boat

    I stayed at the State Shipping Service (the name was changed around this time to WA Coastal Shipping Commission), and served on the new modern cargo vessels that were acquired, for a couple of years. Several events all occurred at around the end of this time period, one of them being that we sold the farm, and another being a consolidation of the shipping industry that made my job redundant.

    However, now armed with a marine engineer's certificate I had some options. I was offered a job with AOS, a division of P&O Shipping that operated the oil rig supply ships. The company was expanding and building new vessels at Carrington Slipways just outside of Newcastle at Tomago on the Hunter River.

    I accepted but had to put the job on hold as I had committed to being the engineer on a small ship being built in Japan. The job was only a "run job" to sail the vessel from Japan to Darwin, along with two deck officers that I had worked with at State Ships.

    I am not going to mention the name here, but this was and still is, a well known Australian pearling company that was having the ship built as a "mother ship" for their cultured pearling operation near Darwin.

    This was my first trip overseas, so a new passport and various health injections. For whatever reason I had a Yellow Fever injection and it very nearly killed me! I cannot recall but I assume the flight would have been on a B.707. An overnight stop in Singapore where we all mis-behaved, a fuel stop in Taiwan where I remember there were armed guards all around the airport and a stop in Hong Kong at the old Kai Tak airport with its incredible approach and landing.

    We stayed in Tokyo for I think 2 nights, followed by an exhilarating trip on the Shinkansen "bullet" train to Osaka. There are many small ship building yards in this area. I am no longer sure, but I think it was "Nishi-F or similar. We stayed in what was called a "businessman's hotel" some distance away from the yard as we had to travel back and forth via train.

    The area where we stayed could not have seen too many foreigners, and I can still recall one bloke driving a truck that very nearly ran off the road as he stared at us while driving past. The biggest problem, apart from the block of wood supplied as a pillow in the rooms, was trying to get something to eat! The small restaurant attached to the hotel had those ubiquitous plastic models of each available dish, so we could go and point to what MAY have been suitable. We did teach the Japanese cook to say "pork jop", so that was a known fallback!

    The vessel was being built using fiberglass (GRP) or FRP as the Japanese refer to it. At that time, they were World leaders using GRP. It was around 90 feet /30 meters long, similar to the long line tuna boats used in Japan, and it was fitted with holding tanks using circulating sea water to carry live oyster shells.

    A single inline 6 cylinder Caterpillar engine driving a single prop plus a shaft generator, and a separate small generator, possibly a Yanmar, that could provide the full required load when stopped or manoeuvring. It had a full complement of electronic navigation aids, but no GPS at that time. There was a domestic type chest freezer mounted on deck in a watertight GRP box. I donít recall any other refrigeration or air conditioning, but there may have been.

    to be continued



  10. #120
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    732
    Japan to Darwin by small boat continued

    I do not recall launching the vessel, so I assume that it was already afloat. The fitting out was not complete, and no commissioning had been carried out. They were very honest workers in the shipyard. One day the owner's son left his camera down in the engine room. When he realized and went back to retrieve it the painters had been there. They had very carefully spray painted all around his camera with out moving it, or covering it in paint!

    One of the most important commissioning procedures with a new vessel is to carry out an "inclining experiment", and establish the "light ship" weight. The light ship is not so involved, mostly a matter of knowing the design displacement and then reading the actual draught marks once the vessel is in the water, to calculate the weight.

    The inclining experiment is a lot more involved and critical. Basically, it is a procedure to determine the "metacentric" height (GM); the vessels stability and center of gravity, so that when it rolls about its longitudinal axis, the bloody thing does not turn turtle! It is probably best to look up the procedure with Google if you are really interested.

    https://www.marineinsight.com/naval-...t-of-the-ship/


    The test involves knowing the weight of the vessel and a couple of simple measuring devices. Added to this some movable known weights are needed, and the means to shift them from one side of the vessel to the other to a known measured distance from the centerline.

    This was the first time that I had been involved in this, although aware of what the requirement was. In later years I was involved on bigger ships, but in all cases the experiment was carried out by a surveyor bought in to do the job and make the calculations, and I only had to witness it.

    Now this was a relatively small vessel, but it still needed the experiment under IMO rules.

    As it was in the dockyard still water was not a problem, but having some movable weights and where to put them was. I can still see this in my mind to this day:

    They set up the required instruments ready to record the movement and THEN, 4 or 5 little Japs got up on top of the bridge, and on the word of a "conductor", ran together from one side to the other until such time as the roll had built up enough to record! Seeing was believing!

    They took me through the calculations, but as it was all in Japanese, I had little option but to believe them!

    to be continued





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