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Thread: Redgum firewood in short supply, fines for illegal harvesting

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Bellarine Peninsula, Brackistan
    Posts
    2,980
    Quote Originally Posted by Saitch View Post
    We predominantly use black wattle, with some Grey Gum occasionally. A few years ago we got a sweep out to inspect our metal fireplace and after a full inspection, he said that if we keep using the wattle we won't require his services. Burns clean with little residuals, apparently.
    About 20 years ago I was with my old man in the Grampians for a week and he (being of the scientific mind) was determined to decipher which available firewood, at the campsite we'd used for yonks, was the best, as in heat and how long it burnt.

    We had redgum, yellow box, swamp gum, native cherry and black wattle available dry in profusion.

    Over the week we burnt various combinations and permutations of available wood and the clear winner was black wattle on its own.

    The temp test was how fast a really cranking fire could melt a beer bottle. Black wattle burnt white hot on it's own. Was ok in combination with redgum, but not as hot.

    Black wattle has to be used carefully in a coonara........... been known to melt them if used wrongly around here.

    DL

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
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    1,120
    It's a pity these timbers get burnt, it's like burning mahogany.
    Arapiles
    2014 D4 HSE

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Encounter Bay
    Posts
    426
    Quote Originally Posted by windsock View Post
    Thanks Dave. Yeah, fat fingers on the phone keypad and spell check sheesh!

    Tried malaynoxlan but it shuddered to a halt in our dry summers here in clay loam. Like trying to grow trees in a clay brick. A lovely timber yes but is stunted a bit now. Haven't tried obliqua or regnans yet. Thisll be my third year of trying out what grows and not here. Acacia m & d are winning so far.

    Had extensive trouble with leaf roller, and skeletoniser in the most of the Eucalyptus in year 1 & 2. Bit of a temp set back in growth rate and in some cases itll impact on tree shape. E leucoxylon and sideroxylon took a hammering too. They're for the birds & bees here that love the nector in winter and not for firewood.

    Just looked at our nursery website and they have E regnans. Might add to this winters list.
    Ah, yes the melanoxylon wouldn’t like the clay, however the E regnans and E. obliqua should.

    love your scheme of providing for the birds and bee, apart from the ubiquitous gorse, early spring nectar can be a hard to find, good luck with your arboretum , I once made a living falling timber, but also collected kilos of seed, replanted , and protected forests.

    i gather you are up around Waiouru, not exactly B.O.P, climate, more Fred Dagg country 👍

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Tatura, Vic
    Posts
    5,455
    My own assumption having heated my home with wood for 28 years is this.

    The heavier a piece of wood, assuming the same dimensions, the better it is, providing that it is well seasoned.(Minimum 12 months)
    Dave.

    I was asked " Is it ignorance or apathy?" I replied "I don't know and I don't care."



    1996 TDI ES. 2003 TD5 HSE

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    zuu!umop
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    1,161
    Quote Originally Posted by Hogarthde View Post
    Ah, yes the melanoxylon wouldn’t like the clay, however the E regnans and E. obliqua should.

    love your scheme of providing for the birds and bee, apart from the ubiquitous gorse, early spring nectar can be a hard to find, good luck with your arboretum , I once made a living falling timber, but also collected kilos of seed, replanted , and protected forests.

    i gather you are up around Waiouru, not exactly B.O.P, climate, more Fred Dagg country 👍
    Back at a proper keyboard now. Cheers for the info Dave. The stunted A. melanoxylon will be pulled and replaced with A. Meansii and dealbata next week. I'll also be planting a particularly wet area with A. mearnsii, E. ovata and fastigata and will try a few regnans but note they don't coppice. E. nitens is now taking off and the 2-year olds are growing out of the juvenile stage and providing some preliminary shelter. If they're not good firewood, the way I have planted them will provide welcome shelter on a very wind swept hillside in a gully. I also have a few Alnus cordata (italian alder) for their deep roots and shelter on the hillside. Our equinoctial winds are big and these buggers keep their leaves till late winter so will cut out some of the autumn gales at least and slow some of the spring landlash. I will also begin planting out NZ natives now I have some semblance of shelter happening. A lot of our natives here get flagged in high winds so shelter will at least allow some vertical stem to establish before flagging.

    It is a small 2-acre hillside sort of between the Manawatu sand country and the lower Rangitikei hill country. Being a hillside means it doesn't get sodden in winter but dries out quick in summer if dry weather. A mix of 'expansive' clay loam and sandy clay loam. Newly planted heritage apple trees are loving the sandy clay loam sections. I guess it could be viewed as a 'hobby' arboretum much like some view lifestyle blocks as 'hobby' farms. I prefer growing trees to grazing animals so trees it is. May get some Boer goats for curry, weed control and dog tucker eventually but in no hurry to look out for animals.

    Fred Dagg! Now there's a blast from the past...
    Gumboots, they are wonderful, gumboots, they are swell
    'coz they keep out the water, and they keep in the smell.
    And when you're sittin' round at home, you can always tell
    When one of the Trevs has taken off his gumboots.

    If it weren't for your gumboots, where would ya be?
    You'd be in the hospital or infirmary
    'coz you would have a dose of the 'flu, or even pleurisy
    If ya didn't have yer feet in yer gumboots.

    Now there's rugby boots and racing boots, and boots for drinkin' rum.
    But the only boots I'm never without, are the ones that start with "gum".
    I've got short ones and long ones, and some up to me belt.
    I'm never dressed 'till I've got on me gumboots.

    Whenever I sing at the opera, my gumboots are a must.
    They help me hit the high notes, and protect me feet from dust.
    They keep the water well away, so me voice won't get no rust.
    You will not never see me without me gumboots.

    Now (names of current unpopular politicians), they haven't made a hit.
    They're ruining the country, more than just a bit.
    If they keep on how they're going, we'll all be in turd.
    So you'd better get yer feet up yer gumboots.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    brighton, brisbane
    Posts
    27,405
    Quote Originally Posted by windsock View Post
    Just to re.ove possibility of differences in names, is this the acacia mearnsii black wattle? If so, we used that here too. Grows like a weed and ample mounts washed down the local rivers after floods. I've been planting out several small blocks of this for short rotation coppicing source of firewood for future years. Also been trying E. nitens, ovata, fastigata, botroides and gunni. All growing ok in the cold wind swept gully but ovata and fastigata appear better suited to wet dry wet dry cycles. The acacia mearnsii and dealbata going great too.
    The black wattle which grows in North Qld., coastal NT, PNG and Indonesia is the Acacia auriculofornis. Also called the Northern Black Wattle , and Ear Pod Wattle. The Brigalow, or Acacia harpophilia is the heavy wood used by aborigines for nullas , burns well.
    halfbacks were invented to stop prop forwards taking over the world.

    Ladies, if a man says he will fix it, he will. There is no need to remind him every 6 months about it.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    brighton, brisbane
    Posts
    27,405
    Climate outlooks for Northern Australia, July.

    https://nacp.com.au/static/climate_o...ok_2020-07.pdf
    halfbacks were invented to stop prop forwards taking over the world.

    Ladies, if a man says he will fix it, he will. There is no need to remind him every 6 months about it.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    24,736
    I've just cut about a quarter of a tonne of ironbark to take to my nephew after morning tea - his partner is in hospital having got a pair of new knees on Monday, and he is not able to cut wood with travelling to town to see her each day.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    zuu!umop
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDNSW View Post
    I've just cut about a quarter of a tonne of ironbark to take to my nephew after morning tea - his partner is in hospital having got a pair of new knees on Monday, and he is not able to cut wood with travelling to town to see her each day.
    I like the saying about firewood - "He who cuts firewood gets warmed twice". Unless of course you are giving it away. Although in this case i guess it still stands as radiant heat is given up for the acquired warmth of giving. Good onya!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    24,736
    This wood was from the pile of trees cleared for the house to be built in 1994, so it is well seasoned. Same source for the stuff in the woodbox for the house that I am burning at the moment. Last lot was from the windrow that was the result of some clearing well before I bought the place in 1990.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

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