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Thread: Could it possibly be Hybrid?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Brisbane
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    98
    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoMick View Post
    I think I read somewhere that the earth receives enough energy from the sun in a day to power human civilization for a year, or something like that. We just have to get smarter at storing what we need for when the sun isn't shining.
    If only it were that simple. The reality of our situation is far more complex and urgent. I’m not at all opposed to solar, wind etc – we can and should use them to the maximum degree that is beneficial. But there are constraints in terms of material resources, location, build time, scalability and cost, which in the end make it impossible to meet all the goals (cheap, fast, sufficient, reliable) to solve the global challenge.

    Unless we can perfect CO2 capture and disposal, the fossil fuel industry needs to shut down ASAP. The path to that point is built by renewables and nuclear in combination.

    (And I do have sympathy for those whose lives are connected to the fossil fuel industry. I pay a lot of tax and I would vote for government assistance to help transition those workers and communities to something else productive. Nuclear plants could be an in-situ replacement for some existing coal burners. There’ll be lots of work in constructing and running replacement infrastructure all over the country.)
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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Crafers West South Australia
    Posts
    9,981
    Quote Originally Posted by vnx205 View Post
    Did you fit a timer switch for the HWS?
    I planned to do the same thing so that the heat pump only operated during the day so that I could use my own electricity instead of bought electricity at night.
    I asked the company that sells my heat pump HWS about that and was told that the system needed to be continuously connected and needed to come on three times a day.
    I find that hard to believe. I understand that they are normally connected full time and that it might be common for them to switch on three times a day, but surely it isn't compulsory.
    Maybe it was just a sales person rather than a technician who answered my email.
    I had my sparkie fit a user programmable timer switch to my meter box so I can set the HWS to come on whenever it suits me. I have a temp readout in the laundry so I can boost it only if I need to, sometimes after a power failure. Selecting auto + on allows the HWS to stay on until the next programmed off time, no extra thought needed.

    I suspect the reasoning for permanently on HWS is to prevent the water temp from dropping below around 50C at which level the water no longer kills pathogens. Monitoring does just as good a job, especially if you're not a heavy user of hot water.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tuross Head, South Coast, NSW
    Posts
    5,019
    Thanks for that description of your setup.
    I had assumed that a timer in the meter box would be simple enough. After all there used to be a timer there some years ago for the off peak HWS. A heat pump doesn't draw a lot of power (or current or whatever), so I assume a competent electrician could select a suitable timer switch.
    I hadn't considered monitoring the temperature in the tank. How is that set up?
    There are only two of us in the household, so we are not big users. No teenage daughters.

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  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Crafers West South Australia
    Posts
    9,981
    I fitted one similar to this one:

    DC 12V 10A Digital Temperature Controller Thermostat Control w/ Sensor Aquarium

    AC powered version of same:

    220-240V Digital Temperature Controller Temp Sensor Thermostat Genuine STC-1000 | eBay

    putting the NTC sensor into a modified brass plug in the spare tank outlet as it has two of them. The sensor cable was extended with 2 metres of twin flex which hasn't affected the readout by any noticeable amount.

    The main job of the temperature controller is to switch off the solar powered circulating pump I installed with some solar collectors that only get sun for 6 months of the year. On super hot days the panels could lift the tank temperature over 70C which is the upper limit for a glass lined steel tank so I stop the pump at 65C.

    This is like the timer that I had my sparkie install:

    DIN Rail Digital LCD Power Programmable Timer Time Switch Relay AC 220-240V 16A | eBay

    Quote Originally Posted by vnx205 View Post
    Thanks for that description of your setup.
    I had assumed that a timer in the meter box would be simple enough. After all there used to be a timer there some years ago for the off peak HWS. A heat pump doesn't draw a lot of power (or current or whatever), so I assume a competent electrician could select a suitable timer switch.
    I hadn't considered monitoring the temperature in the tank. How is that set up?
    There are only two of us in the household, so we are not big users. No teenage daughters.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Logan
    Posts
    12,116
    Quote Originally Posted by TB View Post
    If only it were that simple. The reality of our situation is far more complex and urgent. I’m not at all opposed to solar, wind etc – we can and should use them to the maximum degree that is beneficial. But there are constraints in terms of material resources, location, build time, scalability and cost, which in the end make it impossible to meet all the goals (cheap, fast, sufficient, reliable) to solve the global challenge.

    Unless we can perfect CO2 capture and disposal, the fossil fuel industry needs to shut down ASAP. The path to that point is built by renewables and nuclear in combination.

    (And I do have sympathy for those whose lives are connected to the fossil fuel industry. I pay a lot of tax and I would vote for government assistance to help transition those workers and communities to something else productive. Nuclear plants could be an in-situ replacement for some existing coal burners. There’ll be lots of work in constructing and running replacement infrastructure all over the country.)
    There is certainly enormous job creation potential in investing in new energy infrastructure for the future in this country. It is already a major growth industry, so imagine how much bigger it could be with more sympathetic rules.
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