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Thread: Engine Stalling (when cold)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    10

    Engine Stalling (when cold)

    Hi

    I have 2001 model P38A with the Bosch system. Of late, when starting the engine, it will start ok but then stop.
    After a few attempts the engine will remain running but with an intermittent idling (occasionally bordering on stalling, then picking up).
    However, I noticed the other day, when I revved the engine, it then just dropped revs, spluttered then died.
    So it is idling, albeit somewhat roughly, but no revving allowed.

    Any suggestions as to the culprit/s?

    I'm also weighing up whether it will be time to upgrade, so looking at the 2006-2012 models, but for the life of me cannot decide best move.
    I have also been told the later model sport, supercharged models off-road capabilities were reduced to compensate for their performance and handling dynamics.
    The 2003-2005 models I like, but concerned I may end up with more problems due to the older age.

    All thoughts, suggestions appreciated.

    Cheers
    Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulToll View Post
    Hi

    I'm also weighing up whether it will be time to upgrade, so looking at the 2006-2012 models, but for the life of me cannot decide best move.
    I have also been told the later model sport, supercharged models off-road capabilities were reduced to compensate for their performance and handling dynamics.
    The 2003-2005 models I like, but concerned I may end up with more problems due to the older age.

    All thoughts, suggestions appreciated.

    Cheers
    Paul
    Hi PaulToll,
    For fear of starting a firestorm, I would argue that the natural progression from a P38 Rangie for someone who regularly goes bush would be a Discovery 4. (Dodges bullets!). Let me explain while I'm still alive. I have, over forty years, progressed from series Landrovers to a 1993 Rangie LSE and my own P38 (in NZ) and a bit of experience with P38s here. The ride (both on and off-road) of the LSE was as good as I would ever need. The P38 is significantly better and the D4 is significantly better again. For all I know, subsequent Rangies are even better, BUT, if you want to go bush in a later model vehicle in the same way as was normal in a series Landrover and Classic Rangie (bullbar, winch, diff locks etc.) and reasonably possible in a P38, then the D4 is the vehicle that can be readily equipped for bush use with off the shelf products.

    Now I know there are members here who take their L322s to remote places and I'm not suggesting it can't be done, I'm simply suggesting that Rangie lovers should not discount the D4 as it feels to me at least to be an evolution from the P38 more than it is from the D2. And it comes with a split tailgate, too!
    2013 D4
    1966 Army engineering trailer
    1976 SIII diesel tray (farm ute)
    (previously SII 2.25 swb, SIII 2.25 swb & lwb, P38 Vogue, 1993 LSE HS2.8)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Adelaide Hills
    Posts
    7,944
    AFM would be where i start looking
    Quote Originally Posted by Disco Muppet View Post
    Micks commodore brings all the lads to the yard, and they're like "do a sick skid brah"

    Bitumen: A blatant waste of taxpayers money!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Williamstown, Victoria
    Posts
    573
    I have the same year and model as yours, if I experience any idling problems, I always clean the butterfly valve with Throttle body and carby cleaner first off.
    I would also check the battery terminals and give them a clean up, also make sure your battery is ok, P38's need a solid 12v supply to run properly, a weak battery can cause all sorts of weird issues.
    The fuel injection system can do strange things like you describe when not getting proper voltage.

    You may also want to check your relays, they can burn over time, try swapping the ignition relay for another one the same colour.
    I like to start with the simple stuff first before looking into deeper causes.

    Failing that, it kind of sounds like a possible fuel pump or fuel pressure issue, but I would check those things as a first step.

    I've also been looking into a possible upgrade to an L322 at some stage.
    I'm sure the Discos are great, but Range Rovers get in your blood!
    I did a bit of reading about best year models etc and the general consensus from actual L322 owners, was to get the newwest one you can afford.
    I have been eyeing off the 2007 or 08 models, there was a major update for the 07 model, including Jag derived engine.
    I'm waiting for the price to get to a good point and then I'll probably take the plunge.
    Hope that is of some help!
    Cheers, Pete.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    10

    Smile Crank Angle Sesnor

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterH View Post
    I have the same year and model as yours, if I experience any idling problems, I always clean the butterfly valve with Throttle body and carby cleaner first off.
    I would also check the battery terminals and give them a clean up, also make sure your battery is ok, P38's need a solid 12v supply to run properly, a weak battery can cause all sorts of weird issues.
    The fuel injection system can do strange things like you describe when not getting proper voltage.

    You may also want to check your relays, they can burn over time, try swapping the ignition relay for another one the same colour.
    I like to start with the simple stuff first before looking into deeper causes.

    Failing that, it kind of sounds like a possible fuel pump or fuel pressure issue, but I would check those things as a first step.

    I've also been looking into a possible upgrade to an L322 at some stage.
    I'm sure the Discos are great, but Range Rovers get in your blood!
    I did a bit of reading about best year models etc and the general consensus from actual L322 owners, was to get the newwest one you can afford.
    I have been eyeing off the 2007 or 08 models, there was a major update for the 07 model, including Jag derived engine.
    I'm waiting for the price to get to a good point and then I'll probably take the plunge.
    Hope that is of some help!
    Cheers, Pete.
    Thanks Pete

    There was a guy here with a Disco and the way he described the problem he had was identical to mine, he was mentioning the crank angle sensor.
    A few months back I had to replace the head gasket and it was thought then the crank angle sensor had taken a hit as the engine had overheated, apparently a common to the sensor units failing.
    But, some dudes down at a RR specialist workshop assured my mechanics the sensor was fine but the truck has never really been ok since, but only with the occasional miss - as I was still new to the P38's I just placed it down to me possibly expecting too much from an older engine.

    But you are correct, Rangies do get in your blood and while the Disco's are nice units, I could not find a V8 in the later models - and the V8's perform so well off-road!
    I'm still not sure which model I prefer.
    The 2006 Sport super-charged (L320) seem to have the power quadrant covered but I'm just not too sure with their off-road handling compared to the older L322's.
    I was eyeing off a 2012 unit which I'm pretty sure has the auto drive function (Terrain Control V2) - sort of takes the fun element out - but it was nice unit, just Black (seriously??!!).

    Anyway, will take the truck into a RR specialist (guru), he should come up with something better than my wannabe guesses!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    10

    Not too sure with Discos

    Quote Originally Posted by DieselLSE View Post
    Hi PaulToll,
    For fear of starting a firestorm, I would argue that the natural progression from a P38 Rangie for someone who regularly goes bush would be a Discovery 4. (Dodges bullets!). Let me explain while I'm still alive. I have, over forty years, progressed from series Landrovers to a 1993 Rangie LSE and my own P38 (in NZ) and a bit of experience with P38s here. The ride (both on and off-road) of the LSE was as good as I would ever need. The P38 is significantly better and the D4 is significantly better again. For all I know, subsequent Rangies are even better, BUT, if you want to go bush in a later model vehicle in the same way as was normal in a series Landrover and Classic Rangie (bullbar, winch, diff locks etc.) and reasonably possible in a P38, then the D4 is the vehicle that can be readily equipped for bush use with off the shelf products.

    Now I know there are members here who take their L322s to remote places and I'm not suggesting it can't be done, I'm simply suggesting that Rangie lovers should not discount the D4 as it feels to me at least to be an evolution from the P38 more than it is from the D2. And it comes with a split tailgate, too!
    Thanks!
    While I like the Disco's, they do not have the V8 which is what I like, mind you the 6 cylinder diesels are good too, but the 8's just eat it up.
    I've driven a variety of 4WD's (of course all non Rangies), so this experience with driving a truck on the black and then without much thought, just guiding her into the bush with little or no enhancements is still blowing me away!
    Who knows though, maybe down the track I may give the D4's a look over.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Williamstown, Victoria
    Posts
    573
    In my experience, the crank angle sensor/aka crank position sensor/aka cps, tends to be a show stopper when it dies.
    Mine decided to pack it in on the way home from work one night, going into a major roundabout at peak hour, she just died.
    It was turning over fine, just not firing, meanwhile the traffic had quickly banked up for a kilometer behind me.
    It could have waitied another 10 seconds before it died...talk about murphys law!
    A fellow AULRO member just happened to come along in his disco and kindly pulled me through the roundabout to a safe spot where I could call a tow truck.
    On the way through the roundabout, a late model Range Rover came flying through with his horn blaring, how dare I get in his way...he was probably upset to see a disco towing a Range Rover.
    I was lucky enough to get a new cps ordered and the Rangie was back on the road in under 24hrs, not too shabby!
    The cps is something you may want to change anyway, to save yourself an experience like I had.
    It's not a hard job to replace, just a bit tight for space in behind the engine.
    It could well be an intermittent fault in the cps causing your issues, I'd say give it a shot, not a bad idea to replace it anyway, as it's probably the original one.
    Cheers, Pete.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mullaloo, Western Australia
    Posts
    1,087
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterH View Post
    In my experience, the crank angle sensor/aka crank position sensor/aka cps, tends to be a show stopper when it dies.
    Mine decided to pack it in on the way home from work one night, going into a major roundabout at peak hour, she just died.
    It was turning over fine, just not firing, meanwhile the traffic had quickly banked up for a kilometer behind me.
    It could have waitied another 10 seconds before it died...talk about murphys law!
    A fellow AULRO member just happened to come along in his disco and kindly pulled me through the roundabout to a safe spot where I could call a tow truck.
    On the way through the roundabout, a late model Range Rover came flying through with his horn blaring, how dare I get in his way...he was probably upset to see a disco towing a Range Rover.
    I was lucky enough to get a new cps ordered and the Rangie was back on the road in under 24hrs, not too shabby!
    The cps is something you may want to change anyway, to save yourself an experience like I had.
    It's not a hard job to replace, just a bit tight for space in behind the engine.
    It could well be an intermittent fault in the cps causing your issues, I'd say give it a shot, not a bad idea to replace it anyway, as it's probably the original one.
    Cheers, Pete.
    I changed my cps around those 220k Mark as this appears to be around the time they fail (IMHO). For peace of mind the old one is in with the spare wheel along with a few other parts......just in case 😉
    Gary

    1996 p38a HSE
    2" lift, Gen3 bags, adjustable Terra Firma +2" shocks, adjustable panhard rod, adjustable sway bar disconnects, EAS bypass, Ashcroft ATB F&R, 255/55/18 Toyo Proxes ST for road & 265/75/16 Maxxis Big Horns for off road :)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Sassafras
    Posts
    1

    Same Problem

    Hi Paul, I have the same problem with my Vogue, seems to only happen on the colder mornings!!Very frustrating as it takes a few minutes to get past the stalling/restarting stage. If you find out what the problem is I would be interested in the Fix.
    Mick.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulToll View Post
    Hi

    I have 2001 model P38A with the Bosch system. Of late, when starting the engine, it will start ok but then stop.
    After a few attempts the engine will remain running but with an intermittent idling (occasionally bordering on stalling, then picking up).
    However, I noticed the other day, when I revved the engine, it then just dropped revs, spluttered then died.
    So it is idling, albeit somewhat roughly, but no revving allowed.

    Any suggestions as to the culprit/s?

    I'm also weighing up whether it will be time to upgrade, so looking at the 2006-2012 models, but for the life of me cannot decide best move.
    I have also been told the later model sport, supercharged models off-road capabilities were reduced to compensate for their performance and handling dynamics.
    The 2003-2005 models I like, but concerned I may end up with more problems due to the older age.

    All thoughts, suggestions appreciated.

    Cheers
    Paul

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Williamstown, Victoria
    Posts
    573
    Just a thought, have you cleaned your maf sensor lately?
    The sensor can get dirty over time and give incorrect readings, causing rough idling/running.
    I replaced mine a few months ago due to rough running and it did wonders.
    Might be worth giving the sensor a clean, only use the correct spray for this job.
    Cheers, Pete.

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