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Thread: Neurotic EAS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Mornington Vic
    Posts
    65

    Neurotic EAS

    Well I thought I finally got my head around Rosies EAS when she thows thows me a curved ball.
    EAS tries to raise to high level at random. Happend to me three times now. All in 50-60klm zone while driving. With no input (ie button pressing) from me.
    I can cancel it back to normal height but it takes time to return.
    I put an o-ring through the valve block a couple of months ago and a new compressor and apart from a slow leak overnight on nearside rear that i thought id trace and fix next service.

    What the hell? Brains trust....help!
    Last edited by Saulman1010; 3rd July 2018 at 06:13 PM. Reason: Neurotic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Mornington Vic
    Posts
    65
    **
    Neurotic!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Townsville, QLD
    Posts
    2,506
    Gíday mate,

    As soon as things start going crazy like that, thereís one thing Iíll preach until the cows come home.... EAS driver unit. That will be your issue.

    Cheers
    Keithy

    Green 2000 P38 Range Rover HSE - Gone
    Blue 1999 P38 Range Rover HSE - Gone

    Silver 2002 P38 Range Rover HSE - Sequential LPG, BCDC Charger, TPMS, Rear Locker, Wheel Carrier, Bullbar & Spotlights, General Grabber AT2's, Too Much to Mention!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NW Tassie
    Posts
    1,684
    Mine also does weird **** when parked all alone at night, tuckeed away in the shed, goes high or low, very moody but always even.
    But when driving it will stay in high mode until I ddo about 1km above 80kmh, then it drops back to normal, then after about 1km of under 80kmh it will raise to high again.
    This can be stpped by locking the height with the button
    Not sure if its supposed to work like that but it does
    But I must say it seems the most happy when tucked away in the shed and it can do its own thing.
    Only every found 1 error in the eas with nanocom and that was a faulty height sensor, cleared and hasn't come back yet
    Now touching wood
    cheers
    blaze

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    11
    Interesting fault.

    I modified my EAS system because I wanted to be in control of what it was doing, rather than the other way around. This modification inhibits it from operating on the move, and prevents the 'wakeup every six hours and adjust to the lowest wheel height' phenomenon that's (to me) a real PITA and quite unecessary. Although it wouldn't be a fix as such for yours it may be something to think about once you've sorted the issue...

    In terms of your specific problem I'd suggest you could have a connection/earth issue around the EAS control box under the seat. This may not be the problem you find eventually but it's where I'd start - uncommanded ride level changes on the move are more likely to come from there (IMO).

    If you want to isolate the issue (ie. determine for sure whether it's from the EAS control or some under the bonnet problem) just put a meter or light tracer on the output from the EAS control to the inlet and exhaust valve lines. I wouldn't expect them to be operating at 50km/h, if they do then the issue is most likely to be at the EAS control box or its inputs (and if that proves to be the case we could go through some further fault-finding procedures). Inlet valve is pin 26 on the connector, exhaust is pin 9 (this is for the plug that connects to the EAS control unit located under the passenger's seat).

    That's all from first principles, there is a fair bit of data around on how the EAS units operate and the problems others have had so a bit of research will most likely give you some common faults and fixes too.

    BTW does the problem still occur if you have the inhibit switch in?
    Last edited by private; 4th July 2018 at 03:36 PM. Reason: clarify connector location

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Mornington Vic
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by private View Post
    Interesting fault.

    I modified my EAS system because I wanted to be in control of what it was doing, rather than the other way around. This modification inhibits it from operating on the move, and prevents the 'wakeup every six hours and adjust to the lowest wheel height' phenomenon that's (to me) a real PITA and quite unecessary. Although it wouldn't be a fix as such for yours it may be something to think about once you've sorted the issue...

    In terms of your specific problem I'd suggest you could have a connection/earth issue around the EAS control box under the seat. This may not be the problem you find eventually but it's where I'd start - uncommanded ride level changes on the move are more likely to come from there (IMO).

    If you want to isolate the issue (ie. determine for sure whether it's from the EAS control or some under the bonnet problem) just put a meter or light tracer on the output from the EAS control to the inlet and exhaust valve lines. I wouldn't expect them to be operating at 50km/h, if they do then the issue is most likely to be at the EAS control box or its inputs (and if that proves to be the case we could go through some further fault-finding procedures). Inlet valve is pin 26 on the connector, exhaust is pin 9 (this is for the plug that connects to the EAS control unit located under the passenger's seat).

    That's all from first principles, there is a fair bit of data around on how the EAS units operate and the problems others have had so a bit of research will most likely give you some common faults and fixes too.

    BTW does the problem still occur if you have the inhibit switch in?
    Its random havent found any common denominators yet. Will try inhibit switch.
    I love the EAS system.on these cars but they can be trying at times.
    Ive had the vehicle for 20 years and years ago I made and effort to chase down all the earth points and clean them up to resolve frequent globe fail warnings. You might be on the right track. Worth looking at. Then ill tackle a test light on the eas output. Thx for your ideas.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    220
    The raising and lowering around 80kph is default behaviour, at least it is one mine. Perhaps there were differences for certain parts of the world I am not sure. I like this system if only because on highway speeds driving in the low mode, especially with the arnott gen3 bags you feel almost like driving a real car Solid on the road, through corners as well and when on the backroads and cities with speed bumps you drive around in the higher mode which flattens those pesky bumps out quite nicely

    The driver unit is indeed a prime suspect, at least when a car raises when parked. The eas itself never raises the car when it is parked since you would need control over the compressor in theory, the air tank does not hold enough air to raise the suspension completely, at least not on my car but it has been modified. I can't even force my car to raise with the faultmate instructing it to do so without the engine running. Imho that rules out any if not most eas components except the valve block (a very particular set of leaks) or the driver unit actually openening a particular set of valves.

    Also, for the op's problem; the car raising to high, would that be the top light or extra high mode? this can happen due to faulty sensors. When the car detects that it is grounded it will try to go even higher by pushing more air into the bags in a last ditch effort to get some (more)grip on one of the wheels. When your sensors are out of whack the eas computer might get a conflicting signal thinking it will need to raise. Since high mode is only allowed up to 50kph it won't activate above and should even drop down when crossing the 50kph limit.

    -P

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Mornington Vic
    Posts
    65
    thx prelude.
    Ok, that would mean (trigger for extended) would mean that Im getting significant difference in reading from abs sensors- suggesting high grounding.
    Hmmm interesting, for a while now, if I park Rosie with full steering lock, on the next start I could get an abs error wjen I drive away. Im wondering if I have a loose/failing abs sensor?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Townsville, QLD
    Posts
    2,506
    The eas senses grounding by the fact the readings are higher than the target values and the system is unable to lower the vehicle, so instead it raises it to (in effect) lift the body off whatever obstacle itís stuck on.

    Cheers
    Keithy

    Green 2000 P38 Range Rover HSE - Gone
    Blue 1999 P38 Range Rover HSE - Gone

    Silver 2002 P38 Range Rover HSE - Sequential LPG, BCDC Charger, TPMS, Rear Locker, Wheel Carrier, Bullbar & Spotlights, General Grabber AT2's, Too Much to Mention!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    11
    @prelude is quite correct, the two trigger speeds (IIRC) are ~50km/h and ~80km/h, both of these triggers should cause a lowering of the vehicle, not raising.

    The inputs to the EAS controller are the four height sensors, brake, handbrake, doors, engine speed and road speed (not counting the compressor inputs, inhibit or up/down switches at this stage). the combination of these inputs and the software logic means that in essence the EAS controller should not alter the ride height of the vehicle upwards while the doors are open, the brake is on (for < 3min), there is no engine RPM and/or there is road speed. It may however reduce ride height in some circumstances with these inputs in an otherwise inhibit condition.

    If the simple test earlier suggested confirms it is the EAS controller commanding the ride height adjustment up on the move then while there could be an issue with one or more of the ride height sensors it shouldn't be the primary fault - because the various other interlocks should prevent this from happening.

    Again I reiterate that I say the above from first principles and from recollection. I could be wrong and would encourage some research on the way EAS works, but if it were mine that'd be the path I'd follow and the logic I'd use in order to determine the fault.

    Carrying on from this and to my mind (assuming the test determines it's a commanded change to the valve block) the actual fault could be an faulty input to the EAS controller, or a faulty controller. The input fault could arise from connections (possibly intermittent, including earth issues) or sensor/data faults. This should be relatively easy to determine with some fairly ordinary measuring equipment.

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