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Thread: Recovery 101 including acronyms and definitions

  1. #1
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    Recovery 101 including acronyms and definitions

    we will see how this rolls as recovery topics can get a bit heated......

    this thread will kinda be like wikipedia where i will update post one once there is a concensus i.e. the number of thanks on each post

    we need to keep it in laymans terms so that it is easy to read, understand and apply

    we might start with acronyms

    SWL - Safe Working Load
    is the load that a piece of lifting equipment, lifting device or accessory can safely lift, suspend, or lower without fear of breaking. This should be mark on the equipment by the manufacturer. The SWL is calculated using a safety factor For example, 5:1 (5 to 1, or 1/5). An example of this would be a chain that has a MBL of 2000 lbs would have a SWL or WLL of 400 lbs if a safety factor of 5 (5 to 1) is used

    WLL - Working Load Limit
    which is the maximum working load designed by the manufacturer. The load represents a mass or force that is much less than that required to make the lifting equipment fail or yield, also known as the MBL The SWL is calculated using a safety factor For example, 5:1 (5 to 1, or 1/5). An example of this would be a chain that has a MBL of 2000 lbs would have a SWL or WLL of 400 lbs if a safety factor of 5 (5 to 1) is used

    MBL Minimum Breaking Load
    is the minimum load required to make the piece of equipoment fail

    GBS Guaranteed Braking Strain
    Is this the same as MBL?

  2. #2
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    RecL Recovery Load. SWL refers to the working limit of equipment used to lift things off the ground.
    The Recovery load, where a load is being pulled at an Angle less the 45 Degrees above the horizontal is usually the SWL Doubled, as the load is not leaving the ground it is not classed as lifting tackle.
    Therefore, a shackle that is rated at 3.2 Tonnes for SWL can be safely used in Recovery situations up to 6.4 Tonnes, provided the load is not taken above 45 Degrees above the horizontal.

  3. #3
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    Hymie wrong, a SWL/WLL limit that is stamped/embossed on to a piece of lifting/recovery gear. is just that, regardless whether it is in the air or not. The SWL is the same no matter what it is used for, for instance a Guy Wire on a Mast or antennae has a SF of 2, if your scenario was correct it would have a SF of 1 because it is not lifting off the ground. Regards Frank.
    What Goes Around, Comes Around.
    94 Disco 300TDi Auto, with the Lot
    93 Disco with the lot, Gone
    78 Series III 109, Diesel.
    Toyota BJ 40, Gone
    Ford Bronco WOW, Gone
    Toyota 4Runner RIP
    F100 4WD, Unbelievable, Gone
    Suzuki Brilliant, Gone

  4. #4
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    SF - Safety Factor

    I dare not attempt a definition.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mools View Post
    SF - Safety Factor

    I dare not attempt a definition.
    When a piece of rigging/recovery equipment is manufactured to comply with Australian Standards (AS....) it has to be "Rated" by a government approved Lab.
    First the (say for instance a wire rope or sling) sling is stetched on a machine till it breaks, they do this a few times to establish the Guaranteed Breaking Strain, known as the GBS, lets say this GBS of this sling or any other rigging/recovery gear (whatever) is a known 10 tonnes.
    Because wire rope can be used in many different applications a Safety Factor was introduced, for instance, General Purpose can be lifting slings or winch cables, where they are subjected to rough wear and tear, the SF is 5, so a 10 tonne GBS winch cable or sling has a SWL of 2 tonne. As stated in another post earlier in this thread the GBS lessens with every use/abuse, so the powers that be decided that a SF of 5 would keep us safe.
    Other examples are Guy Wire/Standing rigging has a SF of only 2, because it is not dragged on the ground, overloaded or abused. Where as a Lift/Elevator that conveys People off the ground has a SF of 10, so if the SWL of the Lift is 5 tonnes than the cable must have a GBS of 50 tonnes.
    The point is if you work within the SWL limits and maintain and regularly inspect your recovery equipment it should last a long time, abuse/misuse it and it could kill you, Regards Frank.
    What Goes Around, Comes Around.
    94 Disco 300TDi Auto, with the Lot
    93 Disco with the lot, Gone
    78 Series III 109, Diesel.
    Toyota BJ 40, Gone
    Ford Bronco WOW, Gone
    Toyota 4Runner RIP
    F100 4WD, Unbelievable, Gone
    Suzuki Brilliant, Gone

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeds View Post
    we will see how this rolls as recovery topics can get a bit heated......

    this thread will kinda be like wikipedia where i will update post one once there is a concensus i.e. the number of thanks on each post

    we need to keep it in laymans terms so that it is easy to read, understand and apply

    we might start with acronyms

    SWL - Safe Working Load
    is the load that a piece of lifting equipment, lifting device or accessory can safely lift, suspend, or lower without fear of breaking. This should be mark on the equipment by the manufacturer. The SWL is calculated using a safety factor For example, 5:1 (5 to 1, or 1/5). An example of this would be a chain that has a MBL of 2000 lbs would have a SWL or WLL of 400 lbs if a safety factor of 5 (5 to 1) is used

    WLL - Working Load Limit
    which is the maximum working load designed by the manufacturer. The load represents a mass or force that is much less than that required to make the lifting equipment fail or yield, also known as the MBL The SWL is calculated using a safety factor For example, 5:1 (5 to 1, or 1/5). An example of this would be a chain that has a MBL of 2000 lbs would have a SWL or WLL of 400 lbs if a safety factor of 5 (5 to 1) is used

    MBL Minimum Breaking Load
    is the minimum load required to make the piece of equipoment fail

    GBS Guaranteed Braking Strain
    Is this the same as MBL?
    SF for chains are different to wire/rope, usually a SF of 2.5 is used, all rated chains have the Grade/tensile rating marked on them, it can be on each link or spaced out evenly along the chain, never buy chain that has no stamped links, buy from rigging suppliers, they are usually made up or you can order to suit your needs, Regards Frank.
    What Goes Around, Comes Around.
    94 Disco 300TDi Auto, with the Lot
    93 Disco with the lot, Gone
    78 Series III 109, Diesel.
    Toyota BJ 40, Gone
    Ford Bronco WOW, Gone
    Toyota 4Runner RIP
    F100 4WD, Unbelievable, Gone
    Suzuki Brilliant, Gone

  7. #7
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    Quote: "MBL Minimum Breaking Load
    is the minimum load required to make the piece of equipoment fail

    GBS Guaranteed Braking Strain
    Is this the same as MBL?"

    I have no idea what MBL stands for, is it Max or Min and what do either mean, I think GBS is the easist to understand, Regards Frank.
    What Goes Around, Comes Around.
    94 Disco 300TDi Auto, with the Lot
    93 Disco with the lot, Gone
    78 Series III 109, Diesel.
    Toyota BJ 40, Gone
    Ford Bronco WOW, Gone
    Toyota 4Runner RIP
    F100 4WD, Unbelievable, Gone
    Suzuki Brilliant, Gone

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tank View Post
    Hymie wrong, a SWL/WLL limit that is stamped/embossed on to a piece of lifting/recovery gear. is just that, regardless whether it is in the air or not. The SWL is the same no matter what it is used for, for instance a Guy Wire on a Mast or antennae has a SF of 2, if your scenario was correct it would have a SF of 1 because it is not lifting off the ground. Regards Frank.
    Sorry Tank, I beg to disagree.
    SWL only applies to loads lifted off the ground.
    Source:
    Australian Army Recovery Training Course handbook, craploads of course notes and tests and 16 years of doing it for a job.

    ( I think I know what I'm talking about)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hymie View Post
    Sorry Tank, I beg to disagree.
    SWL only applies to loads lifted off the ground.
    Source:
    Australian Army Recovery Training Course handbook, craploads of course notes and tests and 16 years of doing it for a job.

    ( I think I know what I'm talking about)
    So why don't they put 2 weights on recovery/rigging gear, SWL is the weight at which the item is subjected to Safely. Your statement makes out that something being dragged along the ground is half as heavy or that you can't be injured by an object on the ground.
    Look go here
    http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/formspublications/publications/Documents/rigging_guide_2005_005.pdf
    and show me the item that backs up your statement, a shackle or a sling with SWL stamped on it doesn't know whether it's lifting something off the ground or not, it's all related to HOW much load is applied, Regards Frank.
    What Goes Around, Comes Around.
    94 Disco 300TDi Auto, with the Lot
    93 Disco with the lot, Gone
    78 Series III 109, Diesel.
    Toyota BJ 40, Gone
    Ford Bronco WOW, Gone
    Toyota 4Runner RIP
    F100 4WD, Unbelievable, Gone
    Suzuki Brilliant, Gone

  10. #10
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    Kingston, Tassie, OZ.
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    Worth adding to Franks detailed post about Safety Factors, the ''crane code'' (Is it still called that?) IIRC lists seperate SF's for equipment used where personnel are involved like lifts, vehicle hoists and other items where people are working under or riding in an object suspended or lifted. The lift was the example that prompted this reply as you can see the SF is doubled effectively where passengers are involved. Our vehicle hoists have to comply similarly as we work under them, and they are considered a high use / wear item with a reasonably high duty cycle and varying loads.

    Please correct anything above Frank, if you see anything you disagree with or can add as this is from memory and not up to date.

    JC
    The Isuzu 110. Solid and as dependable as a rock, coming soon with auto box😊
    The Range Rover L322 4.4.TTDV8 ....probably won't bother with the remap..😈

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