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Thread: New ARB high lift 'JACK'

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Arcadia N.S.W.
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    1,727

    New ARB high lift 'JACK'


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    BRISBANE
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    279
    The only disadvantage I can see vs the traditional, is the Hi-Lift/ Farm Jack can be used as winch/puller as well as lifter/spreader.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    Narre Warren South
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    It'll be interesting to see a price........


    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    It'll be interesting to see a price........


    Colin
    I was told in the $900 range.
    Damien
    ------------------------------------------------

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kilmore, VIC
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    322
    Quote Originally Posted by Vern View Post
    I was told in the $900 range.
    How long before we see cheap, shoddy knock-offs I wonder... Sad to think that way in the first instance. Shame on me...

    You've got to hand it to ARB for continuing to look at traditional equipment and wondering if there's a better way to do it and then having the moxi to design, develop and tool it. They'll Market the hell out of this and we'll see them on many showponies, no doubt. The Wranglers with the full catalogue thrown at them and not a scratch in sight. But I think there will also be a relatively small market for enthusiasts that will value this new design.

    I'll be interested to find out more about these and really understand the strengths and weaknesses. The suggested price is eye-watering, but fleets could justify the extra expense easily (especially in the modern era of OH&S) and the weight saving is huge. Given people are spending hundreds of dollars extra on lightweight batteries to save a few kgs, is this that more of a stretch if you feel you should/must carry a HiLift?

    I've got a traditional HiLift and have only used it once... to lift a tram! Too heavy to take travelling.
    DiscoClax
    '94 D1 3dr Aegean Blue - 300ci stroker RV8, 4HP24 & Compushift, usual bar-work, various APT gear, 32" KL71s, 3deg front arms, D2 front shaft, Detroit lockers, $$$$, etc.
    On it's way...from WA: '08 RRS TDV8 Rimini Red ** can't sleep, too excited **

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Narre Warren South
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    3,730
    I think a Hi-Lift looked after and used properly is still useful. There are lots of cheaper knock-offs and they are usually covered in mud, dust etc. which could compromise their safe use.
    I have a mount for the Hi-Lift so it's carried on the spare wheel carrier but it stays in the shed normally.

    If the $900 price is correct then I'm clearly not in their target market......


    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northside, Brisvagus, Qld
    Posts
    248
    According to Mr Callinan , https://mr4x4.com.au/direct-arbs-design-lab-arb-jack/ "jack" is going to retail at $995. Clearly I'm not in the target market either.
    The Radflo Hydra-Jac has been around for a while Hydra-Jac it's a bit cheaper, my last enquiry was about $600 on my door step.

    Although the Radflo unit only does 1000Kg where as the ARB will do 2000Kg. T
    The lift height is pretty good at 540mm, but it's still 10Kg - https://www.arb.com.au/recovery/hi-l...essories/jack/

    I hate HiLifts but I detest putting a bottle jack under the car. Hmmm.
    MY12 Defender
    Sold 99 D2 TD5
    When I grew up there were 9 planets.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    252

    Thumbs up

    If you can indulge an old fart for a minute, this principle is far from new. My late Father had from new a 1954 Ford Mainline ute. It came with a "bumper jack", that had a small hydraulic reservoir and a pump similar to a bottle jack mounted on the top of the leg ram. The ute was rated at 1/2 ton load, plus the weight of the vehicle, and this thing would lift it no problem. As it lifted the body the stroke must of been enough to allow the suspension to drop down. If I recall correctly, the weakest part was the bumper mounting brackets.

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