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Thread: Copper coated steel bundy line

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Inner East.
    Posts
    8,856
    Legality aside, copper brake lines are fine if they are rigidly clamped down particularly only a short distance from a flare. One of the reasons the safety nazis banned them was that if not tied down properly they vibrate, work harden and snap off at the flares.
    URSUSMAJOR

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    20,205
    Quote Originally Posted by Tote View Post
    Fair enough, My series 1 has some copper lines but as stated they may be replacements. The line from the reservoir to the master cylinder is also copper but this would not be under pressure anyway.

    Regards,
    Tote
    Doesn't matter if it is under pressure or not - if it breaks it will let the fluid out. Not all at once but you will still end up without brakes. And yes, that line was steel from the factory too.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,117
    pretty sure the issue with copper brake lines is work hardening from being pressure pulses as brakes are used over thousands of cycles. At least that's my recollection of how it was explained at TAFE many years ago.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    20,205
    I very much doubt that the pressure pulses have much to do with it - the major effect will be vibration from the movement of the vehicle over the road (especially on corrugations) and vibration from engine vibration and out of balance prop shafts and wheels. The brake pressure impulses probably are at a rate of a few per kilometre (or way less on rural roads) where vibration from engine and drive train is typically hundreds of times per minute, and from the road irregularities at a similar rate. And the strain from both of these is likely to be higher than the strain due to pressure, and more importantly, is concentrated at particular spots, such as the base of the flare at each end.

    Pipes are supposed to be secured to prevent vibration, but even so, there is some scope for movement, and securing is often neglected when pipes are replaced.
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,117
    probably right, it's been a long time and many beers since then.

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