Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: Dead or Alive....

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Aaaaaaaa
    Posts
    5,834
    Going, going, gone then?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    Might need to be a bit broader

    Quote Originally Posted by Scallops View Post
    Going, going, gone then?
    Dan,

    Hello again.

    "Going, going, gone" sort of captures the spirit of it for the dead ones, but not the heroes that seem to simply refuse to give up:



    and



    and



    I sort of had in mind this sort of thing, as well.

    But, not all wrecks or necessarily spotted abroad for that matter - anything wearing springs and the black and white variant of the oval badge should qualify.

    Maybe, "dead or alive"................

    Cheers,

    Neil
    Last edited by S3ute; 19th February 2016 at 01:52 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg, Queensland
    Posts
    2,087

    How about

    G'day S3Ute,

    How about the Valiant and the Vanquished - either way they have put in a good fight! We are talking about Series Land Rovers after all.

    Or maybe the The Valiant and Valhalla

    Kind Regards
    Lionel

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    interesting

    Lionel,

    Hello again from Brisbane.

    I find your thinking on this appealing.

    I happened to mention to young Godfrey one day while out scouting for parts that back in Australia my fellow enthusiasts commonly give their prized possessions names. When he inquired of the type and I responded with the likes of "Nellie, Violet, Bob" and so on I couldn't help but detect a slight sneer. I sensed a little disappointment that we were shooting a bit low on the naming front.

    Happened to be looking at his prized Defender one day and noted a broken indicator light. It seems he had reduced the biological efficiency of some poor cur on his way home the previous night. I ventured that I thought the name he gives his truck (the Defender) was also a little on the weak side for something that clearly should be respected - at least by dogs. In fact, I suggested he forthwith call it the "Smiter of Dogs" or "Dogslayer" or somesuch noble title. Preferably in Ndbele or Shona.

    Taking it further, I have my two Masters students out finding suitable monikers for the fleet - including "one who runs on hope and prayer", "he who leans to the right but tracks to the left", "leaker of oils" and "racing tortoise". I await their translations.

    We have to aim high here.....

    Cheers,

    Neil

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg, Queensland
    Posts
    2,087

    Then it could be...

    Hello S3 Ute - Neil,

    How about Endurance to Elysium?

    Kind Regards
    Lionel

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    Phoenix?

    Hello again from Brisbane.

    During my recent sojourn in Mashonaland, as is usual, I spent some time with young Godfrey and came away yet again marveling at the resilience or 'never say die' outlook of native born Zimbabweans.

    Now the original intent of this thread was largely to pay last respects to products of Lode Lane that had served humankind well in the past - but highly unlikely to in the future. However, Godfrey has yet again offered up something of a counter-factual case study.

    On a much earlier trip to Harare one afternoon I was visiting an agricultural research institute and noted a line of ailing Defenders, none of which seemed to be too far gone to be salvaged:



    You may remember seeing similar photos from that time - more often than not the issue was a stuffed gearbox or brakes, but no funds in the kitty to effect the necessary repairs (plus with a bevy of well-meaning aid organizations offering up free replacements, why would you bother?).

    Anyway, I casually asked young Godfrey one day what might eventually happen to them - his response being that "they were all gone". In fact, he was now the proud owner of one along with another Defender and a Mercedes estate. On further questioning he mentioned that there had been an auction not long before and most went for around US$1000. However, one was quite cheap and at US$200 he had put his brand on it with a view to future restoration.

    In fact, it was parked up in the compound behind where we were working and I was free to take a look:



    Sensing that I thought it might be a little underdone he conceded that between the time that he had lodged his winning bid and when he finally collected the candidate vehicle more than a few other buyers had removed some of the more valuable bits:



    including most of the engine, gearbox and drive shafts, doors, wheels, seat box, floor etc...............



    Nevertheless, with the kind of confidence that only the young can muster, he assured me that getting this vehicle back to sound roadworthy condition was likely to be little more than a minor challenge to his network of supporters - notably, the wrecking yard boys from Chitungwiza. In fact, they had already inspected the purchase and reckoned it would be back on the road within about 6 months with new rubber and a fresh coat of paint for around US$5000.

    Compared to US$10,000 which a comparable road-going Defender would trade for in Harare the profit was more or less already in the bank....

    Hmmm. Well watch this space - I suspect the bugger is right, they are an amazingly resilient and resourceful race.

    Cheers,

    Neil

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    Another veteran of the Bundu

    Hello again from Brisbane.

    I mentioned in a previous post wandering around the wrecking yards of Harare seeking out various bits and pieces for either my truck or small auto badge collection.

    Mid-hunt one morning I came across this old soldier and asked Godfrey to stop awhile so I could pay my respects to another life hard lived in the bush:







    Taken with an old camera phone, but did get the essence of the truck.

    One occupational hazard of playing Landy spotto in Africa and actually stopping to get a closer look is sending out an apparent message that you are showing more than passing interest in the object in question. In this particular case, within seconds at least four potential 'owners' or spotters emerged from the shadows at a running pace with the sorts of offers that one could easily refuse - USD$2000 and it's all yours..........

    Moving on from Land Rovers....

    Some time back I went to the Allora tractor show and revealed a longstanding interest in old tractors - apart from farming, my late Dad and uncles sold International Harvester trucks and tractors from the 1930s through to the late 1980s.

    Well, one lazy afternoon Godfrey and I headed down to Norton (a small community south of Harare) to a once famous agricultural college to see how one of our mutual students was faring in his new job as a lecturer. Quite well as it happens. Anyway, we had the mandatory tour of the facilities when we came across this example of mechanisation to ease the toil of the man (or woman) on the land:



    Actually, the Farmall Cub is one of my all time IH favourites and a constant worry to Mrs S3ute that one will appear under the mango tree in Sherwood one day when she's out........



    And, as ever, the big kid in Godfrey took over:



    Cheers,

    Neil
    Last edited by S3ute; 1st December 2014 at 11:37 AM. Reason: typo

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    A few more veterans from southern Africa

    Hello from Brisbane.

    Been a while since anything got posted here.

    Just had a pleasant few weeks in Zimbabwe and South Africa and after a bit of a Series drought came across a few examples of Britain's finest hidden here and there in various states of motion or decay.

    Firstly, from Bulawayo near my regular bottleshop (drankwinkel in Afrikaans - IMHO a language that probably should have been ruled out after the Treaty of Vereeniging in 1902, or banned at cricket and rugby games anyway):





    The passing A30 was an unexpected bonus that I just noticed in the photo.

    Then another legend from Pilgrims Rest in the highveld of Mpumalanga (South Africa):



    I thought the sticker on the back window said it all - "the oldest 4X4Xfar"....



    The Mr Bean door lock was another nice touch.....

    And travelling with the half-chewed Andre who reckons I must be able to smell them, back in Chimanimani (Manicaland, Zimbabwe) an 80" that might be aptly described as a little more well-used:



    I thought the side dumping option was a potentially useful feature.



    But still providing a stirling service - as they say in the ads "80% of all Land Rovers ever built are still on the road"...........

    Cheers,

    Neil
    Last edited by S3ute; 7th April 2015 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Automotive inclusiveness - just spotted the A30.....

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    Earning their keep or quietly resting

    Hello again.

    Been a while since anything got posted hereabouts by way of tribute to a fallen or falling warrior.

    From about the middle of last year my global roaming drifted a little from Africa and back to Asia, particularly Eastern Indonesia. While missing Africa the East is not without a good many Land Rover spotting opportunities - here are a recent few.

    Taliwang in west Sumbawa (ancient source of one of the fieriest sambals you are likely to have adulterated your chicken dinner - ayam bakar taliwang):





    Praya in central Lombok:





    Not sure where the door sills came from?

    Denpasar, Bali:





    Been driving past this one for years and finally stopped to take a look - something Hindu about returning one's soul to the earth?

    Lompo Tengga, Barru, South Sulawesi:





    Senggigi Lombok:





    And Bima, east Sumbawa:





    What went into this jalopy is anyone's guess.

    Cheers,

    Neil

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,392

    Progress in Zimbabwe - post #16 revisited

    Hello again.

    Nothing to do with democracy, Zanu PF stuffing itself or the Mad Bob pleading to a civilized world for forgiveness - these all being distant prospects at this stage. More a bit of an update on Godfrey's Defender restoration - or where it was up to when I had the opportunity to observe it in Harare back in July last year.

    I had previously mentioned that my dusky traveling companion had put his finger in the air in time to secure an ex-government Defender at auction for the princely sum of US$200. The stated plan was to bring it back to serviceable life with some help from the wrecking yard boys from Chitungwiza.

    As a refresher - here is the photo reproduced from the earlier post:



    That's Godfrey admiring said Defender.

    Well, since then it has found a couple of new friends - also courtesy of the Zimbabwe Regional Police:



    This is what is left when you park a perfectly good Defender wagon in long grass in summer......





    But at US$10 who is going to quibble over a few blemishes, particularly when the Chitungwizans successfully recovered two diffs and swivel assemblies for Project Phoenix.



    A second companion of Zim Police heritage with dented pride from a roll over - in this case thrown in for free - yielded up a gearbox and steering assembly and a raft of other useful parts. It may even donate a better chassis to the project at some future stage. I have its number plate (ZRP021D) in pride of place on my shed wall which is likely to be the source of a future "Sundowner musing" post - this could have earned me a bit of grief had it been detected at customs on departure, but in the happy event was not.



    Another shot, but including Miss S3ute who acted as my traveling companion and social hostess for this particular safari and was pleased to able to report back home that "there appears to be Land Rover idiots spread all over the world, and I got to meet quite a few of them"....

    At that stage a replacement diesel engine was due to arrive from the UK for around US$700 and it was progressing to a rolling chassis. I have been asking Godfrey for photos and will post them if and when such come to hand.

    Until then, I remain more than mildly impressed at the skill of the locals to turn their hand to fixing just about everything (except unfortunately the political system), including heritage motor vehicles.

    Cheers,

    Neil

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Search AULRO.com ONLY!
Search All the Web!