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Thread: Removing hub nuts - advice?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,415

    Removing hub nuts - advice?

    Hello from Sherwood.

    Over in "rides" earlier today I mentioned that my plan to dismantle the hubs on my 88" had hit a snag with respect to freeing the two locking nuts on the stub axles of all four stubs.

    What should have been a fairly straightforward procedure according to the manual proved to be anything but.

    Flattening the retaining washers I tried then to loosen the first of the pair of locking nuts with the "special tool" that I had purchased from the UK some time back.

    Well the nuts and locking tab washers are giving all of the appearances of being welded together and simply refuse to budge. None of this was aided by the tool which is a fairly loose fit on the nut with a tendency to slip sideways and come off when any real force is applied to the large screw driver acting as a cross bar. I mentioned in the thread that the tool came in a blue bag.......... Hmmm.

    So, for now I gave it away before I either rounded the edges of the nut, bent a perfectly good screw driver or did some bodily damage to myself. My question(s) is - are these freakin' lock nuts usually that tight and does anyone around Brisbane have a hub spanner that is actually a neat fit on the locking nuts? The manual gives the usual understated "flatten the locking washers, remove the nuts with the hub spanner, then go have a jolly nice cup of tea" or words to that effect.

    Cheers,

    Neil

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourn(ish)
    Posts
    24,485
    use a small chisel to drive the lips of the locking tabs up and back, if you need to use a pin punch to get the final parts out of the way.

    if you need to use a bigger chisel and the FBH to drive the nuts around in the direction of undo.

    the cheapy uk tube sockets are barely worth wasting your money on, damaging the nuts and in extreme cases turning themselves back into more circular shapes than anything resembling that would undo a 6 point nut.
    Dave

    "In a Landrover the other vehicle is your crumple zone."

    For spelling call Rogets, for mechanicing call me.

    Fozzy, 2.25D SIII Ex DCA Ute
    TDI D1(its responded well to its lecture about poor performance)

    If you've benefited from one or more of my posts please remember, your taxes paid for my skill sets, I'm just trying to make sure you get your monies worth.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sunbury, VIC
    Posts
    12,098
    I use a cold chisel to undo them and buy new nuts - they're only a few dollars, then I reinstall the new ones with a tube socket. Most other people's I've worked on are usually full of marks from chisels too - I think it's by far the most popular and easiest way to shift them.


    1977 101 FC - 'Chucky'
    1986 Classic RR - 'Thing'
    1976 Series III Tray
    1997 Honda CBR1000F
    2003 L322 - Gone to a new home.

    I don't know how to act my age - I've never been this old before...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,415

    Battle scars

    Hello again and thanks.

    The nuts all show signs of having been installed with the help of blunt objects. So, I guess that is the reverse procedure.

    I was probably lulled into a false sense of security by the seductive tone of too many workshop manuals suggesting that it was a run in the park to use a hub spanner.

    My previous run in with removing the universal joints was another story where suggested process and reality took divergent paths.

    One recurring thought was "thank heavens I'm not trying this in the bush....".

    While I have anyone's attention - what is the direction of the thread on the hubs - I was assuming that it was clockwise all around. Not so?

    Cheers,

    Neil

  5. #5
    I use common tube spanner. On one occasion it needed more torque than what a screwdriver could supply, so i enlarged the holes to suit a larger bar. If you need even more torque, may a suggest a proper single hex socket.
    The thread is right hand on both sides.

    Aaron

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    20,074
    I have a couple of tube spanners that look flimsy, but in fact are too hard to file easily and have never shown any signs of bending. They have 2cm holes that allow a decent breaker bar rather than a screwdriver - put it through symmetrically so you can push on one end and pull on the other - or if necessary pull on one end and belt the other end with a hammer, while holding the spanner in place with a padded knee.

    But as Dave suggests - use a cold chisel like your predecessor did, put on new nuts and don't make them ridiculously tight. If reasonably tightened and properly locked, they won't come loose.

    John
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Brisbane,Qld.
    Posts
    1,156
    Hi Neil,

    Also when you put them back on it is best to use new lock washers. The nuts are ok to use old ones if you have to, and you can even file off the spots where previous cold chisels have been used, but the washers should always be using a new/unused part of the washer to bend up. Easiest way to make sure of that is to get new washers but as long as you have a previously unbent part lined up with where you want to bend it then you should be ok.

    Cheers,

    Tim.
    "Clancy" - 1978 Series III SWB Game.
    "Henry' - 1976 Trayback Ute with 186 Holden
    "Gumnut" - 1953 Series I 80"
    "Poverty" - 1958 Series I 88"
    "Arnie" - 1975 710M Pinzgauer

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Ipswich QLD.
    Posts
    1,578
    G'day Neil, I can lend you a really good tube spanner if you need it.

    Cheers,
    Mick.
    1968 SIIa SWB
    1978 SIII Game SWB
    2002 130 Crew Cab HCPU

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,415

    AlertMe Still going

    Hello again from Townsville.

    Waiting for a flight home after a couple of pleasant days in our northern outpost. Keen to keep the momentum going so came to the airport via a tool shop to acquire a cold chisel and earlier via a Land Rover parts source to pick up a set of new locking tab washers - mission successful after an abortive start.

    Rather than frig about Brisbane for the washers I used the Internet to try to locate an outlet for Series parts here in Townsville. The place I had in mind didn't return my call which was to prove a bit inconvenient in hindsight as I then checked out the second name on the list. No point mentioning names but the firm purported to be experts in all things Land Rover and yes they had those parts - $20 which I thought a tad steep but also figured the part in hand is the one you don't waste a tank of gas chasing after. Unfortunately, on checking them back at my hotel quickly noted they were the wrong part - not to let a prospective learning opportunity go begging I can now tell the difference between the hubs on Series and early Defenders and those on a TD5.

    So back there for a refund this morning and on to the original first option - the correct parts now firmly in hand for the princely sum of $8.80. And what a place - there was well in excess of a hundred Land Rovers lined up around the place of all sorts of models and stages of dismantling. The owner also cheered me up by suggesting that my experiences with the lock nuts was fairly par for the course.

    So, hopefully armed with a borrowed heavier duty hub tool, cold chisel and washers the original intent of getting the restoration back on regular track will remain pure.

    Cheers,

    Neil

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