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Thread: Old spanners

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Westlake ,brisbane
    Posts
    1,753
    These are the old set o LR tools in my 80 tool roll. It took a long time to find them all.

    DSCF0346.jpgDSCF0347.jpgDSCF0348.jpg Most of them are the correct tools . The jack handle is a copy of a genuine one , I used a early RR handle to make it & the Tyre pump is not correct but will do until I can find the correct one. The spark plugs are correct & are Lodge brand. The hardest thing to find was the correct Dunlop Tyre leavers.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Narre Warren South
    Posts
    3,995
    A few more adjustable spanners from the Trash & Treasure......

    DSCN4784 by Colin Radley, on Flickr

    The Jaguar one I found a while back, apparently from an E-Type tool kit.
    The miniature pipe wrench is by Webmore.
    The 3" adjustable is an Abingdon King Dick
    The larger one is a 'no-name' but looks like a Lucas Girder adjustable spanner.

    I need to finish a few Land Rovers and stop collecting tools......!

    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Inner East.
    Posts
    9,309
    SAE stands for Society of Automotive Engineers. They wrote the standards to be used by the motor industry. SAE is not and never was a thread system but the SAE set fastener standards for automotive use. The thread systems are NC, NF, NEF, NS, NP and so on. Yanks generally do not use the "U" prefix. A Machinery's Handbook and/or Sidders Guide to World Screw Threads will set you on the path to identifying screw threads. You should have a vernier caliper that reads in both fractions of an inch and millimetres, and sets of screw pitch gauges.
    URSUSMAJOR

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Inner East.
    Posts
    9,309
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleHo View Post
    Yup! All and every CMP vehicle came with a set of spanners so drivers could do roadside repairs,as often workshops were only in rear areas,drivers were trained in vehicle repair and all CMP vehicles both Ford and Chevrolet had standardised parts this made repairs quick and easy,all bolts and nuts were SAE(standard American engineering or unified national fine) unlike British vehicles with BSF,BSW,& Whitworth.

    cheers
    Way back in the 1960's when I was doing some work on Merlins and Allisons for three point hydroplanes there were still plenty of WW2 aircraft fitters above ground and breathing. From conversations I understood one of the reasons they liked the US production Merlins (Packard and Continental) was that each engine came with a high quality American tool kit. The generous Poms, of course, issued bugger all tools with their engines.
    URSUSMAJOR

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Central West NSW
    Posts
    21,302
    From memory the "Unified" means that the thread has the crests (or is it the bottom) may be rounded instead of flat as in the US threads, so the question is, are the US threads labelled without the "Unified" actually made to UTS or US standards?
    John

    JDNSW
    1986 110 County 3.9 diesel
    1970 2a 109 2.25 petrol

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Inner East.
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    9,309
    Quote Originally Posted by JDNSW View Post
    From memory the "Unified" means that the thread has the crests (or is it the bottom) may be rounded instead of flat as in the US threads, so the question is, are the US threads labelled without the "Unified" actually made to UTS or US standards?
    Unified means post-unification. In 1950 the UK and Canada agreed to phase out British thread systems and use the US systems. They were said to have unified their systems. In reality the Brits agreed to use American systems and the yanks did not unify with anybody so mostly ignored use of the U. British thread systems were supposed to fade into history but many years later were still in use as manufacturers did not wish (or could not afford) to alter their drawings and tooling. BA & BSC were still in use more than 20 years after they were supposed to disappear. Low grade fasteners are still being sold with BSW threads.
    URSUSMAJOR

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Westlake ,brisbane
    Posts
    1,753
    A few old spanners I have in a box of old tools .

    IMAG2133.jpgIMAG2134.jpgIMAG2135.jpgIMAG2136.jpg These are just the ones I have at home up at the workshop i have half an ammo box of them. Most of them are BSF & some of the smaller are BA & all are British made.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tuross Head, South Coast, NSW
    Posts
    5,090
    I still have the same three Austin spanners that came with my first car, an Austin A40.

    1973 Series III LWB 1983 - 2006
    1998 300 Tdi Defender Trayback 2006 -
    - often fitted with a Trayon slide-on camper.


  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Inner East.
    Posts
    9,309
    Quote Originally Posted by JDNSW View Post
    From memory the "Unified" means that the thread has the crests (or is it the bottom) may be rounded instead of flat as in the US threads, so the question is, are the US threads labelled without the "Unified" actually made to UTS or US standards?
    John. PM me your e-mail address and I will send my thread charts and tapping drill charts. The charts have the thread profiles and proportions.

    Anyone else want them? PM me your e-mail address.
    URSUSMAJOR

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Narre Warren South
    Posts
    3,995
    Quote Originally Posted by 1950landy View Post
    A few old spanners I have in a box of old tools .

    These are just the ones I have at home up at the workshop i have half an ammo box of them. Most of them are BSF & some of the smaller are BA & all are British made.
    When I'm having a tidy up I'll have to take some photos of the spanners & tools I've picked up at Boot Sales, Trash & Treasure Markets etc. I shifted 3 toolboxes full from the UK to Australia 20 years ago and have been adding more since I arrived. Some of the UK ones are from King Dick, Bedford Vanadium, Williams Superslim and lots of other companies that have now closed or been taken over.

    I found an 'obstruction' spanner the other day in my collection stamped 'War Finish'. Googled it and there seem to be a couple of different ideas as to why spanners were produced in War Finish. Any suggestions ??

    I have a brand new King Dick adjustable with additional jaws attached. Came from a military disposals store about 40 years ago so guessing it was specially made for something military......must dig it out & Google the part number engraved on it.

    I found this book when looking up an Australian made adjustable spanner I missed out on The Adjustable Spanner: History, Origins and Development to 1970: Ron Geesin: 9781785000355: Amazon.com: Books would be an interesting read.
    Just found the authors website Ron Geesin - THE ADJUSTABLE SPANNER 3,000 adjustable spanners.....and I thought I was sad !




    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

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