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Thread: Old spanners

  1. #1
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    Old spanners

    Picked up a few old spanners at the Trash & Treasure last weekend.
    Three Austin spanners.
    A Ford - Made in Canada
    An Enfo (English Ford ??). Same part number comes up with Ford logo when you search the interweb.
    A Cyclone spanner that operates on the flats rather than the corners of a bolt/nut.

    The question is.....the Ford - made in Canada, is it from a Model T ? I know that Ford here were set up & run by Ford Canada.

    DSCN4678 by Colin Radley, on Flickr

    Colin
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  2. #2
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    Ford

    G' day Colin, During the War , the 1939 ,45 that is ,a lot of military vehicles where made in Canada, ....Canadian Military Pattern I believe.
    Ford and Kaiser and G M and possibly others.
    perhaps your spanners are from that era .
    I also enjoy car boot ,jumble sales!

    dave

  3. #3
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    Yup! All and every CMP vehicle came with a set of spanners so drivers could do roadside repairs,as often workshops were only in rear areas,drivers were trained in vehicle repair and all CMP vehicles both Ford and Chevrolet had standardised parts this made repairs quick and easy,all bolts and nuts were SAE(standard American engineering or unified national fine) unlike British vehicles with BSF,BSW,& Whitworth.

    cheers
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  4. #4
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    trout1105 is online now YarnMaster Silver Subscriber
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    I have heaps of old spanners like that somewhere in the shed.
    You only get one shot at life, Aim well

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  5. #5
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    Ford

    If I can pinch Gromit's thread for a minute .......thanks Uncle Ho, now those Blitze's would have to be the most versatile machine ever made ,! even more than a series Landrover
    dave

  6. #6
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    Just remembered this picture of some I got a while ago.

    Spanners 1 by Colin Radley, on Flickr

    The BSA & Rudge ones are probably worth keeping, not sure about the Minerve and another of those EnFo spanners.

    Same guy at the market as the others came from. He visits lots of garage sales and buys up all the tools then runs a stall every Sunday.

    I also have on my desk a very small King Dick adjustable, a copy of a Lucas Girder adjustable and a few others. I must stop collecting stuff !


    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    1,284
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleHo View Post
    Yup! All and every CMP vehicle came with a set of spanners so drivers could do roadside repairs,as often workshops were only in rear areas,drivers were trained in vehicle repair and all CMP vehicles both Ford and Chevrolet had standardised parts this made repairs quick and easy,all bolts and nuts were SAE(standard American engineering or unified national fine) unlike British vehicles with BSF,BSW,& Whitworth.

    cheers
    My F60-L (Ford CMP blitz) has from the factory original BSW bolts on it, the ones with their heads a size bigger than the equivalent BSF bolt. They are 5/16 BSW thread with a 5/16 BSW head, whereas most post war 5/16 BSW threads will have a 1/4 BSW / 5/16 BSF head.

    Aaron

  8. #8
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    I think the change in size of BSW heads/nuts was actually a wartime measure to save steel, but only really implemented in the UK - which means, of course that they would be rare in Canadian vehicles.
    John

    JDNSW
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  9. #9
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    It's suggested that the head size was reduced to save material during WWII then didn't get changed back.
    British Standard Whitworth - Wikipedia

    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,284
    My truck was assembled in Australia, using a Canadian chassis and powertrain, with a locally produced cab and tray. The chassis and powertrain use SAE threads, while the cab uses large head BSW threads.

    Aaron

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