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Thread: Portable Sand Blaster

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Kalamunda: Perth
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    3,071
    Quote Originally Posted by 101 Ron View Post
    The best way I have seen for doing alloy Landrover panels is paint stripper.
    Cost effective and just use a water pressure cleaner to remove.
    The scratches sand and fill with primer and paint as normal.
    This was my experience when doing back yard spray jobs on a RRC I owned. Thought sand blasting would be the go, paint stripper was much faster.
    2011 D4 3.0 SDV6
    1999 D2 V8, in heaven
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    Narre Warren South
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chilly View Post
    I have just used a water blaster on my door frame. It instantly rusted! Just something to be aware of.
    Same with molasses, scrub with clean water and watch it rust in front of your eyes because it's so clean & unprotected. You need to dry it very quickly and hit it with some phosphoric acid.

    Quote Originally Posted by 101 Ron View Post
    The best way I have seen for doing alloy Landrover panels is paint stripper.
    Agree on panels but chassis, axles, springs, wheels etc. need a media blaster.

    Paying someone to do the job is getting expensive, I'm paying about $25 to get a wheel rim done.

    I have a 3-phase supply so I'm on the lookout for a cheap old 3-phase compressor. I'd then use a pot similar to the one Tom linked to but you would need a big tarp to try & catch the blast media to re-use as much as possible.
    You do have to work out whether it's financially viable though and weigh up against the convenience of doing it yourself when you need it rather than waiting.


    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
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    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Darwin
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    Quote Originally Posted by grey_ghost View Post
    Hi All,

    Has anybody had any experience with one of these OR could you recommend a unit?

    My plan would be to set-up a cheap Bunnings Gazebo, buy a proper face mask / breathing unit - and blast away.

    Any recommendations?

    Cheers,
    GG.
    I have one of those units. They're OK. I replaced the ceramic nozzle (half hour life if your lucky) with a boron one (several hundred hours expected life) $90 from BlastOne. Teamed up with a twin single phase pump, only heat tripped once in many many hours of work. Made a half tent of builders plastic lining that resembles a bath tub 6 metres long and 1.5 metres high, the wind takes the fog away. Use a full face agricultural spray helmet, pump mounted on belt using an A1P3 filter. Garnet media.

    As an aside, i fixed a small synthetic sapphire window to the helmet visor. The tear away plastic visor was done in 20 minutes while the sapphire showed no pitting at all. There's a business idea for someone...or don't tell me it already exists

    I've used stripper on really thick coatings of muck and should do OK on the aluminium doors I guess, just watch your skin and eyes. Sand blasting is really good for removing general coatings and getting into tight spaces, although I believe you need to watch old cyanate coatings that can still be toxic dry. Freshly blasted steel can do without undercoat, although it doesn't hurt to have it.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    417
    Abrasive blasters are not really meant for stripping paint, though they do but not as well as UHP water. There real job is to profile steel or the substrate (40-75 microns normally) to provide a much better mechanical grip for industrial coatings.
    They are designed for pipelines, water tanks, ship hulls. When the material is heavily corroded they remove the rust, etc.

    This is a heavy duty industrial process for stripping ten to hundreds of square meters of steel.

    We have experimented with small ones, none have really worked that well, or well enough to continue.

    A bristle blaster is a useful tool for small scale projects and/or maintenance.

    http://www.bristleblaster.com.au/

    We use them a lot at work for small scale repairs on truss nodes, etc. Also consider flappers wheels (many types), needle guns

    There are lighter processes for removing paint,e.g. soda, UHP water, but it may be just easier for soft aluminium panels to use chemical strippers or a less intensive process.

    Wet blasting (or dry ice) is for dust reduction, helpful for industrial scale lead based paint removal lowering containment and dust extraction requirements. Rust inhibitors are used to minimize flash rusting,supported by dehumidifiers and hold coats within 4 hours.

    Clive

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Narre Warren South
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    Hmmm the bristle blaster....not completely convinced.

    The single impact of the wire bristles distinguishes the Bristle Blaster® from all other conventional methods of mechanical surface preparation ?

    It would be interesting to see what they cost and how long they last.... here we go :-

    Monti MBX Bristle Blaster Electric Kit Surface Preparation SE-670-BMC | eBay

    $2,200 gets an awful lot of abrasive blasting done !!

    The pneumatic kit at just under a grand is still expensive.

    Monti MBX DIE BLASTER Pneumatic Kit Surface Preparation SDB-001-BMC | eBay


    Colin





    Colin
    '56 Series 1 with homemade welder
    '65 Series IIa Dormobile
    '70 SIIa GS
    '76 SIII 88" (Isuzu C240)
    '81 SIII FFR
    '95 Defender Tanami
    '60 SII 109 ute (gone)
    Motorcycles :-
    Vincent Rapide, Panther M100, Norton BIG4, Electra & Navigator, Matchless G80C

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    417
    Hi

    Bristle blasters are in no way designed to compete with the abrasive blasting. And in no way can they.

    Remember it is not always possible or desirable to abrasive blast. The process generate tonnes of spent material that must be captured and disposed of (usually at a significant cost).
    It is noisy and require quite a bit of pl;ant.
    Nor is abrasive blasting economic for smaller or elevated works. Erecting a full encapsulation system with air filtering as is required is expensive.
    They are effective and work as intended and are an suitable solution for small scale corrosion removal and profiling -

    They may be suitable for small automotive jobs, particularly compared to a small scale blaster which lack power to profile the material, or clean rust.

    The cost of a tool must always be compared to what it delivers, not what you emotively feel you should pay for it,

    Other small tools grinders, scotch wheels, flap disks to do profile metal as required for base coat adhesion.

    Clive

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