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Thread: What is a #30 Stub in Riveting? Where did the Numbers Come From

  1. #11
    p38arover's Avatar
    p38arover is offline Major part of the heart and soul of AULRO.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homestar View Post
    Just finished a job putting some 1/4 stainless rivets in - even the cordless rivet gun grunted doing those.
    I use a pneumatic rivet gun. I bought it when I had problems doing 3/16" rivets with a hand tool. One has to be sure to keep one's fingers off the trigger until one is really ready to rivet. Operating the tool with a rivet only partially inserted means a very loose rivet that can be a mongrel to remove to redo it.
    Ron B.
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  2. #12
    Lionelgee is offline YarnMaster Silver Subscriber
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    Hello All,

    I remember seeing a documentary about the New York skyline during the construction of the Empire State Building and the rivet crews who built it. One of the team heated a rivet up and then while using the tongs threw the red hot rivet through the air where it was caught by the catcher who used a steel funnel to catch the rivet mid-air. The catcher then passed the rivet on to the hammer team - Accessed 19th June 2021 from New York Documentary - YouTube . I just watched a clip from a 1949 Glasgow shipyard where the catcher only uses gloves to catch the red-hot rivet as it is thrown towards him. Accessed 19th June 2021 from, A riveting squad at work at John Brown's shipyard, Glasgow in 1949. - YouTube


    Here is a YouTube clip from a bloke who uses similar furnace heated rivets in a small industrial studio. Accessed 19th June 2021 from, Hot riveting process | Hydraulic riveting | Compilation - YouTube


    Kind regards
    Lionel

  3. #13
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    Here's a link to a chart of letter and number drills.

    http://www.smithbearing.com/images/p...ionalChart.pdf

    Don.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lionelgee View Post
    Hello All,

    I remember seeing a documentary about the New York skyline during the construction of the Empire State Building and the rivet crews who built it. One of the team heated a rivet up and then while using the tongs threw the red hot rivet through the air where it was caught by the catcher who used a steel funnel to catch the rivet mid-air. The catcher then passed the rivet on to the hammer team - Accessed 19th June 2021 from New York Documentary - YouTube . I just watched a clip from a 1949 Glasgow shipyard where the catcher only uses gloves to catch the red-hot rivet as it is thrown towards him. Accessed 19th June 2021 from, A riveting squad at work at John Brown's shipyard, Glasgow in 1949. - YouTube


    Here is a YouTube clip from a bloke who uses similar furnace heated rivets in a small industrial studio. Accessed 19th June 2021 from, Hot riveting process | Hydraulic riveting | Compilation - YouTube


    Kind regards
    Lionel
    Lionel,

    Watch some of Fred Dibnah's videos where he was restoring traction engines, he was hot riveting in his backyard.

    Interesting character, he was a steeplejack but he also demolished industrial chimneys the old fashioned way. Either laddered up, put a platform round the top and took them down brick by brick or he cut away half the base of the chimney, fitting wooden props as he went then set fire to the base to burn out the props.
    Always had a Land Rover for getting to & from site. Early days it was a Lightweight, later a Series III shorty.

    Turned up to Buckingham Palace to get his MBE in a traction engine. London traffic in a traction engine !



    Colin
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