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Thread: Renewable energy exploding

  1. #1
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    Renewable energy exploding

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    Just how many threads discussing renewables do we need on this site?
    You only get one shot at life, Aim well

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    How many are there?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by trout1105 View Post
    Just how many threads discussing renewables do we need on this site?
    Isn't this the Alternate Energies section?
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoMick View Post
    Renewable energy exploding
    hmm, very unreliable, always exploding.
    several threads about it on this forums about them exploding.
    Quote Originally Posted by DazzaTD5 View Post
    Its a land Rover Defender... you need a real mechanic

  7. #7
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    RE projects that are easy to get off the ground (i.e. solar and to a lesser extent batteries) are indeed exploding in numbers. Other technologies like pumped hydro are still in the works (Snowy 2.0 and Battery of the Nation), but they're coming.

    2018 - Australian Solar’s record-smashing year. In eye-watering charts - SunWiz Solar Consultants
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  8. #8
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    The more discussion here about renewable energy and climate change the better. ...after all, it's fossil fuel burning motor vehicles that are the primary culprits.

    We have a collective responsibility as a significant user group to educate ourselves and work towards change. Obviously it will take time and most of us still need to drive diesel and petrol vehicles, but the more we discuss and inform ourselves the better equipped we'll be to vote with our feet and towards EV's become a viable alternative. This includes doing whatever we can to foster the reduction of coal fired power and support increases in renewable energies where ever possible.

    It's clearly in all our best interests in terms of climate change.

    But it's also in our interests in terms of performance, low maintenance and liveability.

    Most people will buy an EV in the next 10 years because it is better, quieter and cheaper to run. This will accelerate the banning of all new diesel and petrol vehicles (currently slated for 2040 in many cities).

    EV's are coming and it will happen more quickly than anyone could have imagined...

    EV forecasts: not plugged in - ECIU

    There is ongoing discussion about the reality of EV's as climate saviours and the pro's and con's of batteries in terms of manufacture and disposal, but it seems to be adding up that overall EV's will be much healthier for our planet.

    Electric Vehicles: Climate Saviors, or Not? | Issues in Science and Technology

    It's not just making the change to EV's over time that's important, but also being vocal and active about reducing all fossil fuel usage: "The more carbon intensive the grid (primarily due to the burning of coal), the less effective EVs will be at reducing carbon emissions."

    And it's going to happen despite all antiquated notions that it wont:
    Electric future? Global push to move away from gas-powered cars | Environment | The Guardian

  9. #9
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    It's done, in Europe at least. Norway new car sales already up to 45% EV. UK is just about to bring a 1.2gW wind farm online. Not even nuclear power can compete. Renewables are cheaper, faster to deploy and scale. Cheaper will win.

    We just need to push our own government to ditch support for coal and obstruct cheap coal exports that encourage dirty power in dev countries. It's undermining global efforts.

    Unfortunately it seems the push of the vote in this country is not as strong as corporate influence, perhaps because voters here are easily swayed by big money campaigns that set the national dialog / focus.

    We have space and resources to build the biggest solar farms in the world and have plenty of windy onshore and offshore locations for turbines.

    For our own household energy needs, we don't need to wait for government. Solar and batteries can easily free a house from grid coal. But again, we are slow to buy in. We can get finance on a 50 - 100k car that depreciates and eats money by just smiling at a dealership. But we dont buy into battery solar because we can't afford it... so we pay our bills instead -what a joke!

    There should be a relentless national push to get households generating their own power, but again government has been careful to not upset established business models. Why are new builds required to meet efficiency standards but not incorporate solar/battery? It would be so easy!

    Australia should be leading the way. Disappointed, to say the least.

  10. #10
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    Perhaps worth pointing out that the major reason that Norway can afford to subsidise EVs is that oil and gas represent 50% of the country's exports, and that Statoil, the state oil company, owns a large part of the production.
    John

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