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Thread: Grid can go 75% renewable

  1. #1
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    Grid can go 75% renewable

    Our electricity can go 75% renewable if some rules are changed. That's good news.

    Australia's electricity grid could run with 75% renewables, market operator says

    Australia's electricity grid could run with 75% renewables, market operator says | Australia news | The Guardian

  2. #2
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    What it actually says is it could occasionally operate at 75%.

    We need reliable power,not power maybe on occasions.

    Sure it looks like things are moving in the right general direction,but reliability is the key concern.
    Paul

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  3. #3
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    The real key with renewable energy is storage. The Snowy 2 is a one shot wonder. ( I like it). Suspect the significant storage options are growing. One is hydrogen as it can be created and stored and used locally. "2019 about 70 million tonnes of dedicated production" was used in Australia. The growth for existing use is growing. The cost of production from methods with are not"dirty" is reducing at a rate it will be the preferred energy for buses, mining, shipping and trains inside the next 2-10n years. Redox flow batteries with 1MW storage in the news today. 25 year life span claim is interesting. "“Industry analysts estimate fully installed lithium-ion prices at around $450/kWh for C&I [commercial and industrial] projects and our vanadium redox flow batteries are the same price or cheaper on an upfront cost basis,”"

    Personally I think costs must and will be much cheaper than $450/kWh myself! I guess that cost multipleed by charge and discharge cycles and then divided by 10 (years for lithium) or 25 (for the redox -**claimed**) means the cost per “Industry analysts estimate fully installed lithium-ion prices at around $450/kWh for C&I [commercial and industrial] projects and our vanadium redox flow batteries are the same price or cheaper on an upfront cost basis,” is far better. The South OZ cost are partly hidden making it a bit tricky to work that out

    The interesting part is I suspect we will have several components making the solution to suite local factors far more quickly than we have at present. Chatting with a mining exec re cost of power/fuel at a mine site several weeks ago was interesting. Mines in remote areas and other countries with unreliable infrastructure in particular made even some of the very high cost storage options look attractive and under considerations. Those consideration are even more relevant with shareholders demanding consideration for risk with environmental factors.

    Governments drive some change -Usually poorly with compromised solutions. Industry is in some instances innovators and well ahead of the curve. One good example is F1 giving us ABS, traction control, crash safety. While standards are now Gov they all came from racing.

  4. #4
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    So what does the 75% instantaneous equal over a long period.

    Germany has lots of problems getting over 27% continuous even with quite a lot of biomass which to me is not renewable. (see Michael Moore movie)

    Now NSW seems to be getting on the biomass "renewable" bandwagon. How long before they have to clear fell forests to achieve this. Sawdust and waste . what BS.

    And SA has the highest electricity rates in Australia. Why is that?
    But if solar and wind is actually cheaper than coal or gas I look forward to lower power bills. Wait! what is those pink things I see flying?

    Regards PhilipA

  5. #5
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    As I posted elsewhere, I did a Biomass project for work a couple of years ago.

    Very renewable, very viable. Domestic waste alone, including plastics and styrene can all be used.
    Cheers
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  6. #6
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    The story said the system was technically able to cope with 75% renewables if we reach that stage. We're not there yet.

  7. #7
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    What most of these enthusiastic proponents of renewable energy, from both wind and solar, feeding into a national grid overlook is just how precariously unstable it becomes the more of it that is added. There is just one mention of it in that article:

    In a statement on Thursday, the energy and emissions reduction minister, Angus Taylor, said the report highlighted the challenges of integrating record amounts of renewable energy into the grid.
    Taylor said the study recognised solar and wind energy “aren’t enough”, and the inertia in the system provided by synchronous generation would be crucial to maintaining grid security. He said an example of synchronous generation was a gas-fired plant, which runs on fossil fuel.


    There is very little inertia in systems of either type, wind or solar. Within the last year this limitation was demonstrated very clearly in the UK when a major fault tripped off a large thermal power station, throwing a big portion of the grid load onto mostly wind farms. The sudden increase in the load on the remaining stations immediately led to safety trips disconnecting the wind farms in a "domino effect". That then threw the remaining load on to the thermal generating stations, which in turn tripped off. The whole country was blacked out! It also highlighted the fact in the UK that there are only a couple, maybe 3, independent "grids" in the entire structure.

    Despite having spent a large part of my working life around mostly big diesel driven generating plants, I am all for renewable energy, but it is not as simple as some would like to beleive!





  8. #8
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    oh boy! cant wait for electricity prices to fall.
    Quote Originally Posted by DazzaTD5 View Post
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eevo View Post
    oh boy! cant wait for electricity prices to fall.
    🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
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  10. #10
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    Can’t wait for my 110 to stop leaking oil
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