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Thread: Stirlsilver's Disco Ute Project

  1. #771
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Posts
    2,271
    Of course, what you are describing is fairly typical for those that get involved in hot rod building and why we have here the LVVTA guides (don't know if there is something similar in Oz).

    And, the longest journey in reno's is always the finishing details.

    So, chin up bro. It'll be a fit testament to your will and creativity as an engineer.
    Alan
    2005 Disco 2 HSE
    1983 Series III Stage 1 V8

  2. #772
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Melbourne - Eastern sector
    Posts
    963
    When i engineered my D1 ute I failed the brake test. I ended up putting TRW pads on it front and rear and passed with no issues.

    Good luck!
    1996 Td5 Disco UTE
    2003 Td5 D2a

  3. #773
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bunbury, WA
    Posts
    1,585
    Can you just get your existing speedo recalibrated say a nominated % slower? I had the speedo in my series 3 recalibrated at an instrument specialist in Perth and just said it reads 30% slow, please fix it. Only cost me about $150. It wouldn't fix the odo calibration of course...
    Chris


    2014 D4 TDV6
    1954 86" (I'll finish it one day.....)
    1980 Stage 1 v8

  4. #774
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ashfield, NSW
    Posts
    964
    Thanks for the very useful advice everyone!

    Chris, I need to pull the dashboard out anyway to fix the heater core anyway, besides I've already got the electric to mechanical speedo driver which can be calibrated to anything you want.

    Stirling
    My other project - Hobby Society

  5. #775
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ashfield, NSW
    Posts
    964
    Back from holidays! And I got some time in on the project at last.

    First up, dealing with the signal of the vehicle speed to the ECU. I needed to get this sorted out. The problem came from the input on the ECU needing a 0-5V signal, and I hadn't sorted out a way to provide 5V which could be grounded to zero. So a simple addition of a resistor inside of the ECU and that was sorted.


    Here I am testing everything, you can see the little inline speedo transducer which closes a contact internally as it turns. Here I am testing to make sure the ECU is picking up the signal correctly (which it was) and I also tapped in the digital speedo driver to the signal, and I was very happy to see it turn as I turned the speedo cable.


    I did a quick test drive and the ECU was all working great - giving me a gauge showing the vehicle speed on the screen

    Because I needed to fix the leaking heater core, I bit the bullet and and got on with removing the dashboard. Nothing quite like decades worth of dust!

    When the instrument cluster came out I took the opportunity to test the adaptor cable between the electronic speedo driver and the speedo. When I ordered the speedo driver module, they didn't have a Land Rover adaptor cable, but I had a hunch that the Ford cable would fit and I was nearly on the money! Cutting down the clip slightly should get it to connect onto the speedo just like the Land Rover speedo cable




    Everthing is now removed from the dashboard, but it was too late for me to get started splitting the blower assembly which held the heater core within it. So I'll continue with this another day. It's all going to need a big clean!




    Till next time!
    Stirling
    My other project - Hobby Society

  6. #776
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ashfield, NSW
    Posts
    964
    More progress to share everyone.

    I pecked up the courage and took to the heater box to remove the heater core. Initially I was thinking of splitting the entire assembly down the seam in the middle, but I quickly realised that there were a number of parts like louvre linkages that would need to be cut to make that happen. So I decided against that and instead make a hole to slide out the core.

    There was a strangle little piece which allowed you to see half the core, but that's about it?


    Then the cutting started, I did some shallow cuts on either end to make the plastic fold like a hinge to help glueing everything back together again.


    The culprit


    I decided to split the old heater core end tank open to see if I could find the source of the leak, and I did - in the seal right near where the pipes connect to the header. But what was interesting was the amount of junk stuck in the tubes. No doubt the original radiator the car had would have been in a similar condition!


    Leaking point


    Here the new core is installed and I folded the plastic back up. Just before applying the glue. Which was just black silastic.


    As I had found earlier, the only difference between the Ford speedo cable and the Land Rover one was just the length of the barrel, so I cut it down to match.


    Perfect!


    Because I wasn't going to be using the original speedo cable and instead use the speed signal to the ECU, I could block one side of the speed transducer, which was inline of the speedo cable. Because I wasn't fitting the cable from the transducer to the speedo unit, I simply cut the screw on connector and filled it with silastic to make a water tight cap for the speed transducter.


    One thing that I was baffled by was that in the heater unit, a pneumatic actuator controlled by a solenoid valve was used to actuate the louvre to recirculate the air in the cabin. The system uses vacuum and that doesn't work when you have a turbo charged engine! So i've saved that for another day... If anyone has any ideas, i'm open to suggestions!


    Here is the electronic speedo driver mounted, the speedo cable runs behind the fan and up to the speedo console




    Given that the dashboard was off, I pulled out the seats and ripped up the carpets and pressure washed everything, including the dashboard. Ignore the carpets on the left.


    Everything removed from the inside


    After fooling around with the wiring, and fixing some mistakes I had done earlier on, I wired up the speedo driver and put it into setup mode, and I was happy to see the needle spring up on the speedo!


    That's it for now, I still have some more wiring work to do, but after that I'll be able to move onto putting everything back inside.
    Stirling
    My other project - Hobby Society

  7. #777
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Tamworth NSW
    Posts
    3,965
    Quote Originally Posted by stirlsilver View Post

    One thing that I was baffled by was that in the heater unit, a pneumatic actuator controlled by a solenoid valve was used to actuate the louvre to recirculate the air in the cabin. The system uses vacuum and that doesn't work when you have a turbo charged engine! So i've saved that for another day... If anyone has any ideas, i'm open to suggestions!
    Even turbo cars make some vacuum under conditions of no boost (idle, low RPM etc).
    The puma for example has power assisted brakes (like most cars in the modern day), and uses a brake booster to accumulate vacuum to assist the brake pedal. The puma also has a brake vacuum pump on the engine, assisting to create vacuum. The 2.4 tdci is belt driven on the front, the 2.2 has a vac pump on the back of the engine, which IIRC is camshaft driven.
    The old 60 series landcruisers had a vacuum pump on the back half of the alternator.

    So it's possible to have vac on a turbo car, and not outside the realm of possibility for the heater to tap into this vac system somewhere.
    -Mitch
    'El Burro' 2012 Defender 90.

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