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Thread: Valley cover gasket

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Ballarat,Vic,Aus
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    Valley cover gasket

    Hi Guys,

    I'm extremely fortunate. Not only did someone on this forum offer me a 3.9 (I'm not sure he wants to be named). He even delivered it to me

    The motor other than being filthy (well .... its a land rover ) it seems to have quite good compression so I figured I'd take a risk and just throw it in. I've now pressure washed and degreased it 3times .... and you can "almost" see there is alloy under all the grime now. Its so filthy it hard to tell where the leak is actually from.

    I haven't messed with V8's much. I'm going to put a new valley gasket and rocker gasket covers through it. I've noticed there was so much sealant around the ends of the existing valley cover, that both water passages at the back were 100% blocked with sealant when I pulled the inlet manifold off!

    When I fit the new valley gasket, do I just throw away the rubber end pieces and use silicon (like they suggest in the shows such as roadkill garage, vice grip garage .... etc... ). it looks like something that will leak once I re-assemble the motor unless someone that "has been here" before guides me

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Proper cars--
    '92 Range Rover 3.9V8 ... slugomatic
    '92 Range Rover 3.8V8 ... 5spd manual
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I :burnrubber:
    '63 ID19 x 2 :wheelchair:
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas
    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual :zzz:

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
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    I've used rubber seals before they work just fine. you only need a small dab of sealant in corners where inlet manifold pushes down and valley gasketSeals join in a corner. I used composite valley gasket this time have used steel in past really had no issue with either.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Ballarat,Vic,Aus
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    3,105
    Excellent .... There is no "gotchas" I need to worry about then .....
    Proper cars--
    '92 Range Rover 3.9V8 ... slugomatic
    '92 Range Rover 3.8V8 ... 5spd manual
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I :burnrubber:
    '63 ID19 x 2 :wheelchair:
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas
    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual :zzz:

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    Canberra
    Posts
    16,967
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Excellent .... There is no "gotchas" I need to worry about then .....
    It depends - getting the holes in the gasket to align with the holes in the block valley can be problematic - slight elongating of holes in the tin might be needed - only start the bolts, do not tighten until all in.

    I find doing starting with the end metal strip and rubber first - start with center holes as it will centre the tin gasket - patience is required but works out in the end - and yes a smear of sealant on all jointing surfaces helps making sure there are no leaks from the inlet manifold and no coolant leaks.

    Garry
    REMLR 243

    2007 Range Rover Sport TDV6
    1977 FC 101
    1973 Haflinger AP700
    1971 Jaguar V12 E-Type Series 3 Roadster
    1957 Series 1 88"
    1957 Series 1 88" Station Wagon

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meccles View Post
    I've used rubber seals before they work just fine. you only need a small dab of sealant in corners where inlet manifold pushes down and valley gasketSeals join in a corner. I used composite valley gasket this time have used steel in past really had no issue with either.


    Here's what I have. last night I ran the compression tester over it and found several cylinders waaaayyyyyyyy low on compression (just like the Vbelt motor). I noticed they cylinders "chuffed" and crap was coming out of the exhaust ports...... Then the penny dropped.

    if you store a motor for even a shortish period of time. The open valves develop surface rust and don't seat until the motor fires again. I"ve never realised this as I've never owned a compression tester before. I sprayed some wd40 down the inlet ports on the low cylinders, and after spinning the motor on the starter for a short time, they stopped "chuffing" as the valves started to seat again, and we shot upto 135->140psi (the cheap dodgy compression gauge bounces to 140psi... and drops back to 135 when you stop cranking.


    I pressure washed, degreased and scraped the motor down 4 ... no maybe 5 times. I can finally see bare alloy now. I still have no idea where the leaks are. Everything was horrendously filthy, but nothing "soaking wet" with oil to guide to to the location of the leak. The engine number says its a post '88 3.9 automatic ..... Hmmm.... It has a flywheel and clutch ... and the oil cooler lines are date stamped 2002 (disco 2 ... era)....



    so I was pleased to find this so I could now exactly what gasket kit to buy.

    Just to give you an idea how good .... ( er ... hopeless : ) I am at this stuff. I strapped the engine crane to the carry all on the tractor and took this outside to clean. 3 sets of cloths .... a flithly tractor and a backyard of "black" grass later ... I have this to work on.



    Do you like the mess I've made ?? I just dropped the motor back into the shed (I'd packed the inlet and outlet exhaust ports with rags). I noticed the rags were soaking when I pulled one out ..... Hmmm... So I pulled a plug and found water on it ..... Oh damn it. So I pulled all the plugs and filled the inlet manifold with WD40 ... and cranked it ..... Yeah, I was trying to work fast to make sure it didn't sit with water in it for long .... Guess what I forgot to hook up I now know the oil pump is quite ok and will throw oil quite a distance across the shed I figured now I'd thrown oil everywhere, I might as well keep going, so I squirted a good few pump of oil down each plug hole and into the inlet manifold and span it over again to coat everything in there with oil

    I'm guessing all of the neighbours are going to be really impressed the first time this gets started

    seeya
    Shane L.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Proper cars--
    '92 Range Rover 3.9V8 ... slugomatic
    '92 Range Rover 3.8V8 ... 5spd manual
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I :burnrubber:
    '63 ID19 x 2 :wheelchair:
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas
    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual :zzz:

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Ballarat,Vic,Aus
    Posts
    3,105
    Quote Originally Posted by 101RRS View Post
    It depends - getting the holes in the gasket to align with the holes in the block valley can be problematic - slight elongating of holes in the tin might be needed - only start the bolts, do not tighten until all in.

    I find doing starting with the end metal strip and rubber first - start with center holes as it will centre the tin gasket - patience is required but works out in the end - and yes a smear of sealant on all jointing surfaces helps making sure there are no leaks from the inlet manifold and no coolant leaks.

    Garry
    Thanks, I was concerned about putting any sealer on the inlet part of the gasket .... as you may end up with an inlet manifold that is **really** hard to get off if the thing needs to come back apart. Did you just use a anaerobic sealer such as loctite 515 on the gaskets faces around the inlets ?
    Proper cars--
    '92 Range Rover 3.9V8 ... slugomatic
    '92 Range Rover 3.8V8 ... 5spd manual
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I :burnrubber:
    '63 ID19 x 2 :wheelchair:
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas
    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual :zzz:

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Avoca Beach
    Posts
    12,901
    My tips are
    1 check the length of the end valley rubber gaskets. Later non original ones are sometimes too long and need a bit cut off each end .

    2 sealant in water passages. each head is the same so on one head AFAIR the rear LH water passage is not used and up against a blank on the inlet manifold, so it doesn't matter if it is blocked by sealant.

    3 as said check the holes on the gasket line up. this is usually only a problem with shaved heads. You have to press hard on the manifold to push the gasket into the right shape to get the holes to line up.

    4 stuck valves. it is more likely that the exhaust valves were stuck by carbon on the stems. This has always been a problem with the RV8. Usually it is reduced by NOT putting a stem seal on the exhaust valve.

    5 add a bit of sealant around the water passages.
    Cannot think of any more just now.
    Regards PhilipA

  8. #8
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    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Thanks, I was concerned about putting any sealer on the inlet part of the gasket .... as you may end up with an inlet manifold that is **really** hard to get off if the thing needs to come back apart. Did you just use a anaerobic sealer such as loctite 515 on the gaskets faces around the inlets ?
    I just used a sealant (generally silicon) that will not dissolve with petrol - so most automotive stuff is OK - use sparingly on all jointing points - it comes off easily.
    REMLR 243

    2007 Range Rover Sport TDV6
    1977 FC 101
    1973 Haflinger AP700
    1971 Jaguar V12 E-Type Series 3 Roadster
    1957 Series 1 88"
    1957 Series 1 88" Station Wagon

  9. #9
    Homestar's Avatar
    Homestar is offline Super Moderator & CA manager Gold Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post


    Here's what I have. last night I ran the compression tester over it and found several cylinders waaaayyyyyyyy low on compression (just like the Vbelt motor). I noticed they cylinders "chuffed" and crap was coming out of the exhaust ports...... Then the penny dropped.

    if you store a motor for even a shortish period of time. The open valves develop surface rust and don't seat until the motor fires again. I"ve never realised this as I've never owned a compression tester before. I sprayed some wd40 down the inlet ports on the low cylinders, and after spinning the motor on the starter for a short time, they stopped "chuffing" as the valves started to seat again, and we shot upto 135->140psi (the cheap dodgy compression gauge bounces to 140psi... and drops back to 135 when you stop cranking.


    I pressure washed, degreased and scraped the motor down 4 ... no maybe 5 times. I can finally see bare alloy now. I still have no idea where the leaks are. Everything was horrendously filthy, but nothing "soaking wet" with oil to guide to to the location of the leak. The engine number says its a post '88 3.9 automatic ..... Hmmm.... It has a flywheel and clutch ... and the oil cooler lines are date stamped 2002 (disco 2 ... era)....



    so I was pleased to find this so I could now exactly what gasket kit to buy.

    Just to give you an idea how good .... ( er ... hopeless : ) I am at this stuff. I strapped the engine crane to the carry all on the tractor and took this outside to clean. 3 sets of cloths .... a flithly tractor and a backyard of "black" grass later ... I have this to work on.



    Do you like the mess I've made ?? I just dropped the motor back into the shed (I'd packed the inlet and outlet exhaust ports with rags). I noticed the rags were soaking when I pulled one out ..... Hmmm... So I pulled a plug and found water on it ..... Oh damn it. So I pulled all the plugs and filled the inlet manifold with WD40 ... and cranked it ..... Yeah, I was trying to work fast to make sure it didn't sit with water in it for long .... Guess what I forgot to hook up I now know the oil pump is quite ok and will throw oil quite a distance across the shed I figured now I'd thrown oil everywhere, I might as well keep going, so I squirted a good few pump of oil down each plug hole and into the inlet manifold and span it over again to coat everything in there with oil

    I'm guessing all of the neighbours are going to be really impressed the first time this gets started

    seeya
    Shane L.
    So thatís what it looks like under all that crud. 😁👍


    1977 101 FC - 'Chucky'
    1986 Classic RR - 'Thing'
    1976 Series III Tray
    1997 Honda CBR1000F
    2003 L322 - Gone to a new home.

    'Love with your heart - use your head for everything else.' - CaptainDisillusion

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
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    I'm interested in why you didn't just deal with the conrod in the other motor, after your excellent diagnosis of the cause of the problem.

    DL

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