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Thread: The Ultimate FC

  1. #971
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Arcadia N.S.W.
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    1,800
    I'm sure you don't need another one with all the fantastic work you've put into this one, but this popped up today. I thought you might find it interesting.
    Don.

  2. #972
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
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    3,673
    Dated 2013.........the main one shown is a early MK2.....bolt in windows with all its water gear removed.
    Because I know where to look......all of them had cancer in them.(notice in the Third photo the cancer under the main windscreen in side the cabin)

    All of them must have had some sort removal of the swim gear during the last years in service.
    I noticed the other day on mine, a close inspection of the drive shafts for the water jet drives showed they are not original, but appear to be cut down Landrover tailshafts, but the rest of the swim gear...ie the steering gear for the water jets appears original.

    One pommie pain in the bum is enough......let alone the import of a machine and the asbestos hassles ect.

    I am trying paint stripper on this other door.

    Slow job with 10 coats of paint on the door as the stripper only wants to take off 2 coats of paint at a time.
    It is leaving a super smooth finish on the alloy which I don't really want as the new paint will need to bite into the alloy.
    I was thinking of using a small water sand blaster just to finish off the bits I miss with the paint stripper and roughen the surface for primer.

    DSCN1254 by john smith, on Flickr


    PS .....Don.....I think you must see yourself driving/swimming a Stalwart some day as I noticed you follow this thread......and now checking out old Stalwart adds............the Stalwart disease could be spreading.

  3. #973
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
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    3,673
    Time for another report.
    The last alloy side door is stripped, repaired and painted with new seals and stainless steel retaining strips.
    I have not found time to do more rust repair to the hull, It must be the next step.
    The side door seals and hull retaining strips on the LHS of the vehicle have been removed.
    To completely remove the hull side door rubber seals and the retaining strips required removal of the tool box on the LHS rear of the vehicle.
    Removing this also gives me access to the radiator/cooling system header tank and its pipes and rubber hose connections.
    Naturally after 50 years the rubber hoses are due for replacing.
    Much more work has been found rust wise and a lot of rough previous rust and collision repairs.
    the photos tell the story.

    Below took 2x 4 litre tins of paint stripper at $60.00 dollars a tin.
    and I did end up doing some TIG welding repairs.
    Then it was the usual etch and red oxide ect.
    Stalwart LHS door by john smith, on Flickr
    Stalwart LHS door by john smith, on Flickr
    DSCN1379 by john smith, on Flickr

  4. #974
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
    Posts
    3,673
    My little portable vacuum recycling sand blaster provided the rough finish needed for painting after the paint stripper.

    This photo below is the tool box removed from the vehicle as required to access nuts which hold the hull seal retaining strips .
    The standard steel strips were in bad shape and will have to be replaced by my stainless steel items.
    What you can see is the coolant header tank.
    You can see the small hoses I need to replace.
    This is the only part of the vehicle which has a little bit of room which is not used for some thing.
    Stalwart coolant header tank by john smith, on Flickr
    The photo below shows the header tank towards the top of the picture and then the original panels which have been pushed in and also cut etc.
    A large steel patch has been welded over every thing.
    DSCN1382 by john smith, on Flickr
    Below is the out side from the last photo
    DSCN1383 by john smith, on Flickr

  5. #975
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
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    Below is rust on the sealing strip area on the LHS rear of the hull.
    DSCN1385 by john smith, on Flickr
    Below is the bottom of the toolbox showing the rust holes in the bottom of it.
    The tail gate and side door locking levers are the long things in the photo, they are still attached
    DSCN1387 by john smith, on Flickr

    Below is the inside of the tool box.
    I don't have any information on what the hole on the right side holds......a jack may be???? or what the small spring clip holds.
    Inside stalwart tool box by john smith, on Flickr

    Below is the rear of the inside of the tool box......I am guessing the bracket with the felt holds a One pint oil can.
    I will have to weld in patches in the holes on the Left.....It must be water proof.
    Those holes were for extra lights which appears the army fitted for some reason with a extra Clansman radio speaker at the rear and they are now not needed.Inside stalwart tool box by john smith, on Flickr

  6. #976
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
    Posts
    3,673
    Below is the lid of the tool box.
    The hinge is broken off and it looks like the hinge has been replaced a few times in the past.
    Note the old repair on the corner.
    This truck may not have seen many miles, but some one spent a lot of time trying to keep it water tight and a swimmer.
    The mileage is extremely low, but the hour meter shows 1700hrs....may be though swimming ??????????/ or the ignition being left on.
    Previous toolbox lid repair by john smith, on Flickr

    Below is the front side of the tool box and this area is inside the side door.
    Note the long pipe.
    When the tool box is fitted this pipe runs to below the cargo area floor and is nothing more than a breather, as the tool box is sealed well with the lid closed.Stalwart tool box by john smith, on Flickr





    DSCN1392 by john smith, on Flickr

    This photo below shows the side of the tool box which faces the radiator outlet area.
    It has two smallish cleats to tie on a free board extension when loaded and exiting a steep river bank.
    A grab handle for some reason.......may to help climb in the vehicle with the tail gate down.
    There is another small metal loop, which I think could be something to do with the water jerrycan hold down straps.
    Stalwart tool box rust. by john smith, on Flickr

    Below more rust and the Two small cleats for the free board extension on the tool box.

    Stalwart tool box rust. by john smith, on Flickr

  7. #977
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
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    The water jerrycans being carried in the radiator outlet part of the vehicle/load area I learnt was popular with the operators of the stalwart in cold climates.
    They always had a supply of warm water to have a wash and didn't have to use the Boiling vessel .

    Back to the grind stone......or grinding and welding so to speak.
    My next instalment I will try and fill you in with what I know of the Stalwart Mariner project which was to turn the stalwart into a proper rough weather ocean going landing vessel and the hover Stalwart with Two gas turbine power plants.
    Ron

  8. #978
    350RRC is offline ChatterBox Silver Subscriber
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Bellarine Peninsula, Brackistan
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    2,274
    Great work Ron! Love this thread, you've gone where no man has gone before.

    DL

  9. #979
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
    Posts
    3,673
    Alvis Stalwart History Time.

    In the 1960s the British invented the Hover craft.
    Hover crafts were all the rage.
    If I remember correctly Landrover even tried to develop a hover Landrover.
    Alvis was also a part of the Landrover empire for a short time and rover cars was too.
    Rover had been working on gas turbine power plants for cars and trucks since the early 1950s.
    According to a book called Stout, Strong & Sturdy written by John L Rue a hover Stalwart was seriously considered.
    Westland aero space(Vickers British hover craft corporation) was involved and the skirt to be used on the Stalwart as a hover craft was to be from a SRN-6 hovercraft (modified)already in production and use by the British military.
    It was to be called the flying stalwart or Hover duck.
    The skirt was to be retractable..
    The hover craft side of things was to use a Rolls Royce Gnome turbine and road use was to use a Rover 2S-150 gas turbine.
    Retraction of the skirt was to be done hydraulically.
    Alvis was to install the rover turbine to the transmission and normal chassis build.
    Vickers was to do the skirt and propeller/fans side of things.
    A one third model was built/tested and much development work done until the penny dropped and the obvious discovered.( the model worked well and the idea was sound )
    By the time you convert the Stalwart to a hover stalwart, there is no room left for the payload and the idea was dropped.
    Stout, Strong and Sturdy is the only book written on the Stalwart which doesn't have mistakes and incorrect information.
    I only have a copy and the pictures will not reproduce well on to this site.
    I will leave the sea going stalwart mariner project for another post.
    The tool box on the Stalwart is finished after a new bottom was welded in and much sand blasting and rust hole repairs.
    New Stainless steel hinge welded into place for the lid and new felt glued into place for the tools.
    I am still to work out what went where.
    The rustly spring clip shown in a earlier picture I now believe held a small engineers pump oil can.
    The problem now is the tool box is now perfect, but the panel it bolts on to has been patched over in a big way.
    This is now not a really bad thing, but the way it has been done is poor and the area where to tool box bolts on and must be water proof has been pulled down and out of shape because the person doing the patch was lazy.
    more work , it will have to be done correctly and this time I will do a flush patch and not one over the top which causes a rust trap.
    I still have to found the time or inclination to have large cutting and welding sessions after work or on the weekends, in the cold,heat or wind or rain.

  10. #980
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nowra NSW
    Posts
    3,673
    DSCN1397 by john smith, on Flickr

    DSCN1396 by john smith, on Flickr

    DSCN1440 by john smith, on Flickr

    DSCN1442 by john smith, on Flickr

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