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Thread: Installing front radius arms - advice appreciated

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Medowie, NSW
    Posts
    123

    Installing front radius arms - advice appreciated

    I've removed the front radius arms from my 110 GS in order to replace the front and rear bushes on each, and will also be updating the dampers, both front and rear.
    The front bushes in each arm look a bit tired, especially the passenger side, so the exercise is definitely worth doing as far as I'm concerned. The rear bushes look quite good, however I'll be replacing these as well with new. All new bushes have been purchased as genuine parts.

    The radius arm rear bushes are LR Part No. NRC4514, which is the correct part number by the Perentie parts listing, but having removed the arms I've noticed that the new genuine part bushes differ in size - their smaller-end is the same length and outside diameter as the removed bushes, but their bigger-end is smaller in outside diameter (by approx. 6mm - 54mm new vs 60mm old), and they are longer overall by approx. 6mm (42mm new vs 36mm old). Fingers x'd not an issue, but if anyone can shed some light as to why the difference......

    The other issue is there is NO WAY I'm getting a 30mm socket and the head of a torque wrench onto the chassis-end of the driver's side radius arm - the curved base of the fuel tank won't let the combined length of socket and wrench-end fit over the end of the arm and nut. The only way I can see to be able to correctly torque the nut and correctly compress the bushes is to drop out the fuel tank. I've not read anything to date re. having to do this - maybe it's a Perentie thing rather than a Defender thing - and while obviously not impossible it will make a biggish job even bigger. I did think of correctly torquing the passenger-side rear nut once back on the ground and then accurately measuring from end of rod to face of washer/base of nut and using this measurement to set the driver's side nut, but that is a little dodgier than I'd like.

    Any suggestions greatly appreciated, particularly re. the tightening of the rear nut on the drivers-side arm. I'm not looking forward to having to drop the fuel tank AT ALL......

    Cheers, Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    366
    No need for a torque wrench. Just as tight as possible. They are a huge nut that tightens against a shoulder.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Medowie, NSW
    Posts
    123
    Thanks for getting back to me Red90. Yes, you're right - they're a big pair of robust bushes that's for sure - and yes, I'm over-thinking it.
    I plan to mark the passenger-side nut once it is run on the end of the radius arm to the base of the Nyloc insert, then "count turns" tightening-down the nut to the specified torque as a minimum. I'll then do the same on the drivers-side, counting down the same number of turns. At least that way the should both be tightened to ballpark the same torque.

    BTW what are the odds of getting a response from a Landy owner in Canada! My wife and I are coming over to western Canada - in 8 weeks time from today - for a few weeks holiday. Can't wait! Thanks again for your help.

    Cheers, Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    366
    No!! You are not understanding how it is designed.

    The nuts are tightened against a shoulder on the bolt. You tighten and the nut will hit the shoulder and not move and farther. It has zero to do with number of turns or the bushings.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Medowie, NSW
    Posts
    123
    YES!!! OF COURSE! So obvious - how did I not twig to that before. DUH! The nut will tighten down to the machined square shoulder at the end of the threaded section of the arm. Thanks Red90.

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