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Thread: Electric mower and chainsaw- happy camper (and mower)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK83 View Post
    Yeah! $400 buys a lot of petrol/oil/tuneups.

    I think for me tho, it's the convenience/ease factor.
    If battery charged, just plug in and go scenario as opposed to the typical ICE workflow of .. pull(nothing!) pull(nothing!) pull(nothing) .. till you realise that the carby may need a slight tweak, the air filter is probably blocked, spark plug probably black and wet .. and there's wasted 2 hrs trying to figure out why the blasted thing won't start.
    I have the battery now, so all I'd need is the $400 mower(AEG in my case as that's what I'm tied too), so in 20mins I've loaded the battery and cut my knee high lawn. I may have mentioned that I'm fairly lazy about gardening stuff .. haven't cut my lawn for 6+ months

    But when it comes to camping tho, the battery chainsaw is pretty much unbeatable as an overall comparison to a 2 stroke version. I reckon the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.
    I'd agree, maybe, to the advantages but just can't justify the costs involved.

    My petrol mower (4-stroke) is now 18 years old.
    Purchased new it's had maybe 2 oil changes in that period and I just replaced the rear wheels because one broke. The only time it's seen a mower shop was when I purchased it.
    My ride-on is from the '60's, every year I carry out repairs but it was cheap and so far after 16 years or so it still cuts the grass.
    Whipper snippers.......... I've worn a cheap Ryobi out (12 years and the clutch disintegrated) and have been on secondhand ones since then. One from the local tip shop for $10, cleaned the carby and it ran perfectly.
    My $5 Ryobi mentioned earlier plus a couple of freebies that once petrol pipes were replaced and carby's cleaned run perfectly.

    I really don't want to waste money on gardening tools but each to their own.....

    Colin
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  2. #12
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    I'm a bit like you Arthur, somewhat lazy as far as the garden goes,, but I do have my back problems too which stops me a lot.
    I have been fortunate enough though with my petrol options,, they have never really let me down or held me up time wise. But, onwards and upwards, I guess it's time to try the "new ways" of the world with some much upgraded technology and hopefully, some lighter tools to handle.
    I'm already half deaf, so noise doesn't really bother me, although I do feel for others that get annoyed with mowers going off most of the weekend, when they might be entertaining, or perhaps just wanting some peace and quiet to relax with.
    Certainly when out camping, the last thing I want to hear is chainsaws going off, or generators running,,, now there's a thought, someone needs to invent/build an electric genny,, it'd even be self charging ,,, hmm,, maybe I should do some research on that one.
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  3. #13
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    The convenience factor was the major thing for me, my old Rover mower was easy enough to start for the first couple of years of it's life (I was thirty years younger then too) but it got to the stage where it was taking nearly as long to start the mower as to mow the grass. I've had spinal surgery and I have to protect it where I can. For years I've been emptying the catcher with the motor running cos it's too hard to start the thing again, safety squint and get covered in flying debris while taking the catcher off and on- with the new mower, let go of the handle and it stops, I can even put my hands in the chute and clear clumps of grass if I've let the catcher get over full, put the catcher back on and away you go again. Makes it hard to get motivated to get the trimmer and blower out and start pulling on cords again though. I've got a log splitter with a pull-start honda engine and I'm thinking about putting a starter motor on it.
    The mower is actually surprisingly noisy; a different noise to a petrol engine but not as quiet as you might expect.

  4. #14
    trout1105's Avatar
    trout1105 is offline YarnMaster Silver Subscriber
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    Not bei g a fussy gardener I just use my 17.5hp ride on mower to mow my 2 acre lawn But my sister who is a fussy gardener has had a rechargeable lawnmower for 5 to 6 years now and swears by it.
    I did buy a cordless chainsaw last year as a bit of a novelty as it uses the same batteries my other cordless tools use and I now don't bother to take my 2 stroke saw away with me because the cordless saw will do everything I require from it and it is a bloody good unit and much more user friendly than the 2 stroke saw.
    You only get one shot at life, Aim well

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  5. #15
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    I just see batteries as a PITA that I'll need to replace before I get any use out of the item.... the tools sure seem to be brilliant these days though. early this year I purchased one of those cheaper brushcutters with different heads ( lopping saw, hedge trimmer etc)... only it has a genuine honda gx35 engine. I just pulled it down yesterday. 1/8th of a tank of stale fuel in it ... pressed the primer a few times and it started the first pull of the string.

    bloody grass. I dont' do lawn mowers.... I use a tractor with a 2.25meter finishing flail these days. Waaaayyyy better than sneezing and wheezing while a mower throws plumes of pollen and grass at you

    seeya
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  6. #16
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    Electric chainsaws

    Quote Originally Posted by POD View Post
    My 30+-year-old rover mower has been misbehaving for the last couple of years so i decided to look at getting a new mower. The thought occurred to me that I could maybe get one of the newfangled battery lawnmowers plus get a chainsaw to run off the same battery for camping trips, save carrying a tin of two-stroke fuel which is a total pain. I was figuring they would both be seeing only light duty, as I have a 3-cyl diesel Kubota mower that does most of my lawn and I do just a few small areas around the house with the hand mower so there are no clippings to walk into the house, as there's no catcher on the big mower.
    After looking at a couple of different options and viewing some internet reviews, I ended up buying the eGO 56-volt 40cm lawnmower which comes with a 4 amp-hour battery, plus their chainsaw with 16" bar as a 'skin'. There was a deal going for the month (July) where if you bought two of their products, they sent you a free 2.5 amp hour battery also. The dealer threw in 3 extra chains.

    I am now convinced that petrol powered mowers and chainsaws are obsolete.

    I was very pleased with the mower first time I used it but that was late July and the grass was pretty thin.
    I had some logs about 20" diameter that I had not yet finished cutting up for firewood after felling. I took the new toy (or so I thought) saw up the back and got through those things at least as easily as I would have with my trusty Husky saw that has cut every piece of firewood we have burned in the last 15 years. What I thought was going to be a secondary saw suitable for docking small branches, turns out to be a serious saw suitable for any job on my property and then some. We went on a brief outback trip in August and took the new saw, no stinking tin of two-stroke to worry about- just a container of bar oil, and it kept us in firewood with ease, not to mention a minimum of noise. It's actually hard to see the Husky getting much of a run now.
    When we got home, the bonus 2.5 amp-hour battery was waiting at the post office. There was a definite pre-spring growth spurt in the lawn so I decided to experiment and see if the smaller battery would get the mower through my small lawns, total about 200 square meters from memory. When I had got through the usual hand-mowing area, I decided to keep going until the 2.5 amp-hour battery gave up. It gave up after about the same area again, on an area of lawn that I usually do with the Kubota. I had to lift the deck two notches as the kubota deck is set pretty high, this lawn has never had a grass catcher on it plus the grass was over 6" long in some areas. The power is probably about the same as the 4-stroke Rover had.

    So, two batteries and a charger I can run off my inverter, powerful motors that run quietly and need no stinky fuel and no pulling on starter cords, I can't see why I would ever buy a tool with a two-stroke engine again. Only real issue I can see with these things is someone could get seriously hurt treating the chainsaw with less respect than they would with something that's screaming at 120 decibels.
    I had a similar dilemma, but related to chainsaws. My preference was not to go down the petrol path, as we tend to go to parks where these saws are frowned on. Regardless, I looked at the Stihl range in petrol and battery, but finally decided on the Victa ( Briggs & Stratton ) 82volt chainsaw. It came with a 2amp battery, which I thought was inadequate. The assumption was correct, but you would get away with the small battery for around home use. I cut up a huge amount of old power poles for firewood. These logs were hardwood, and approx. 180 to 320mm in diameter. What a revelation ! The saw worked beautifully and despite needing a few recharges, exceeded my expectations by miles. I have since acquired a 4amp battery ( fathers day came in handy ) and have enough capacity for firewood procurement trips. The Victa 82 volt mower is next on my list, as my lawn mower is getting on, and the lawn area I have has decreased. i would say give them a go, just keep in mind you get what you pay for, and the lower voltage appliances are better used for pruning and lighter work.
    D4 2.7litre

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    I just see batteries as a PITA that I'll need to replace before I get any use out of the item.... the tools sure seem to be brilliant these days though. early this year I purchased one of those cheaper brushcutters with different heads ( lopping saw, hedge trimmer etc)... only it has a genuine honda gx35 engine. I just pulled it down yesterday. 1/8th of a tank of stale fuel in it ... pressed the primer a few times and it started the first pull of the string.

    bloody grass. I dont' do lawn mowers.... I use a tractor with a 2.25meter finishing flail these days. Waaaayyyy better than sneezing and wheezing while a mower throws plumes of pollen and grass at you

    seeya
    Shane L.
    I am a good example of what you are saying about batteries. I have a good B&D, (thats black and decker for you kinky buggers) cordless hammer drill 13mm chuck tons of guts. But the batteries are not holding charge any more. So I thought I'd go and buy an additional battery tool or two that I would use and also be able to use the batteries on my drill. Not so, the drill and the accompanying batteries are out of date now and no product that I could find in hardware stores uses similar fitting batteries. $129 per battery to repack....sounds expensive but seek out 24 good quality c cell rechargeable batteries to do the job and you can appreciate the cost.
    Dilemma.....for $260 I can get my good drill going again .....or I can buy a multi-tool pack eg drill , saw , blower or similar with 3 or more batteries included for a few more dollars.
    It's such a modern world we live in.........
    An acquaintence who owns one of Qld's leading battery businesses recommends I go all out and buy a Makita multi tool kit of my choice and hang the expense as he tells all the tradies to buy this brand as he says it leaves the others for dead.
    $260 or $500 or $1000?

  8. #18
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    On the subject of batteries, I recently unearthed a box full of quality A123 lithium rechargeable cells in a cupboard after 10 years not being touched, a project that got shelved and forgotten. Surprisingly all bar two cells came up like new with a single charge. They are quite different to your Ni-Cd cells that die just sitting around for six months unloved.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramblingboy42 View Post
    I am a good example of what you are saying about batteries. I have a good B&D, (thats black and decker for you kinky buggers) cordless hammer drill 13mm chuck tons of guts. But the batteries are not holding charge any more. So I thought I'd go and buy an additional battery tool or two that I would use and also be able to use the batteries on my drill. Not so, the drill and the accompanying batteries are out of date now and no product that I could find in hardware stores uses similar fitting batteries. $129 per battery to repack....sounds expensive but seek out 24 good quality c cell rechargeable batteries to do the job and you can appreciate the cost.
    Dilemma.....for $260 I can get my good drill going again .....or I can buy a multi-tool pack eg drill , saw , blower or similar with 3 or more batteries included for a few more dollars.
    It's such a modern world we live in.........
    An acquaintence who owns one of Qld's leading battery businesses recommends I go all out and buy a Makita multi tool kit of my choice and hang the expense as he tells all the tradies to buy this brand as he says it leaves the others for dead.
    $260 or $500 or $1000?
    I'd love the latest corldless/battery kit from any of the major brands. They are bloody incredible. If you can afford it ... Go for it! I doubt battery technology in cordless tools is going anywhere for the next 10years. If you buy something from the major brands (ie: makita/dewalt/etc...) you should be able to get batteries into the future. Eg: I just purchased a battery for my old makita 18volt drill for about $40bucks delivered.

    Eg: my air compressor. It might not get used for 16months .... Then I'll work that bastard to death for hours a day, for weeks at a time (eg: you have a car to paint .... or something to sandblast). If it was battery operated, I'd have something unusable ( same goes for chainsaws, mowers, slashers, cut off saws, grinders, drop saws, edgers, brush cutters, welders, drills, tech guns etc..). Unless I have a reason to use that sucker all the time, I am going to avoid anything with batteries like the plague... Because the day I need it ... it simply won't bloody work for me unless I spend its purchase price again on bloody batteries. Yeah petrol power stuff is a right PITA. But at least a quick carby strip down and clean usually gets them up and running again!

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Proper cars--
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    Modern Junk:
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  10. #20
    Join Date
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    Avoca Beach
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    I had a Ryobi 18+ drill for 15years. When the batteries died I changed to Lithium, until one day the drill fused and took out the battery also.
    I bought a new one and my other 2.5 amp Lithium is still going after at least AFAIR 7-8 years.
    I bought a 5AH lithium battery to replace the blown 2.5 and also bought a copy battery about 8 months ago.
    I have a Ryobi blower and I can do the whole driveway, decks etc on one charge of the copy 5AH or the real one.

    I bought a Ryobi 18v mower off ebay at the end of last year as my 1977 Rover was bloody heavy to lift up and down stairs, even though it started perfectly. The mower will do front and back yards with one and a bit 5AH batteries.

    I also have a Ryobi 18+ vac and a Ryobi 18+ rattle gun. I loaned my 1/2 air rattle gun and my Ryobi to a mate recently and he tried both to remove a cross threaded wheel nut, and while the air gun would not move it the Ryobi did.
    I also have an ALDI 32 volt chain saw which works really well for cutting fire wood or small trees. I use it all the time as it is a PITA to pull out and fill my 2 stroke saw.
    I charge them on the road using my 300watt pure sine wave inverter and the stock chargers.

    I love the convenience of the battery tools and would not go back to ICE particularly since you don't have to pack 2 stroke petrol/oil mix..

    Regard s Philip A

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